Home » Newpages Blog » Poetry

New Book :: possessions

possessions poems in american poetry by alan botsford book cover image

possessions: poems in american poetry
Poetry by Alan Botsford
Cyberwit.net, May 2022

Author Alan Botsford has penned three other poetry collections—mamaist: learning a new language (Minato no Hito); A Book of Shadows (Katydid Press) with William I. Elliott; and mamaist: a different sort of light (dark woods press). He has also published the hybrid essay-dialogue-poetry collection Walt Whitman of Cosmic Folklore (Sage Hill Press). This newest collection consists of a large cast of poets, of multiple voices, over 150, including many contemporaries. As Botsford writes, “this book is a love letter to the art of American poetry, a tribute to American poetry’s pedigree. Its method is simple—I tried to synthesize what the poets wrote with my own music.”

Event :: Free ELA PD 5 Days of Poetry

Ethical ELA July 2022 Open Write logo image

Every month, Ethical ELA hosts a five-day “Open Write” and invites English Language Arts teachers to join in! ELA is broadly defined to include active and retired K-12 and college/university teachers as well as teachers of English and language arts in a variety of settings. The Open Write is five days of poetry writing developed by different educators with 30 to 100 of teachers participating at various times and thousands observing and borrowing resources. Founded by Sarah Donovan in 2005, this remains a free and ad-free event. I personally participate in this event and look forward to it every month! Some months I miss, sometimes I miss a poem or two, and I know some who visit each month for the prompts but never post them to the site, and that’s okay – however you choose to approach it.

Sarah offers these simple guidelines for first-timers:

Continue reading “Event :: Free ELA PD 5 Days of Poetry”

Contest :: Submit to the 2022 Blue Lynx Prize for Poetry

The Blue Lynx Prize for Poetry 2022 Flyer screenshot
click image to open PDF

Deadline: June 15, 2022
Lynx House Press seeks submissions of full-length poetry manuscripts for the annual Blue Lynx Prize for Poetry. The winner will receive $2,000 and publication. Entries must be at least 48 pages in length. The fee for submitting is $28. Previous judges include James Tate, Yusef Komunyakaa, Dorianne Laux, Dara Wier, Melissa Kwasny, and Robert Wrigley.

Grand Little Things – Feb 2022

Grand Little Things logo

Online literary magazine Grand Little Things is dedicated to “returning versification to verse.” They publish work on a rolling basis throughout the month. During February, they featured poems by J.P. Sexton, Gillian Thomas, Mark Burgh, Fabrice Poussin, Seth Wieck, Diane Lee Moomey, Louise Machen, J. Napolitano, Lisa Creech Bledsoe, and Paul Jones. Stop by Grand Little Things to read these and more.

Traveling With the Ghosts

Poetry by Stella Vinitchi Radulescu
Orison Books, December 2021
ISBN-13: 978-1-949039-25-2
Paperback: 108pp; $16.00

In her latest collection of English-language poems, trilingual poet Stella Vinitchi Radulescu continues to explore the capabilities and limits of language itself as the nexus where thought and physicality meet. Gathering fragments of idea and image from a vast constellation of influences, Radulescu’s nimble, ever-surprising poems weave a tapestry that embodies what it feels like to be both intensely alive and knowingly transient.

Syncopation Literary Journal – Vol. 1 No. 1

Syncopation Literary Journal amalgamates the realms of literature and music. Volume 1, Issue 1 is now available to read on the website for FREE! The first issue contains book excerpts, poetry, creative nonfiction, short stories and flash fiction penned by writers and musicians from around the world. Titles of pieces in issue include: “The First Time I Heard Leonard Cohen”, “Memphis, Tennessee”, and “I’ve Got the Blues.”

Visit the Syncopation Literary Journal website for more information.

Baltimore Review – Winter 2022

The Winter 2022 issue of Baltimore Review features creative nonfiction by Lucinda Cummings, Patricia Dwyer, Dan Hodgson, and contest winner Daniel Rousseau; fiction by Ross McCleary, Evan Brooke, Nicholas Otte, Mariah Rigg, and contest winner Robin Tung; and poetry by Francine Witte, Sara Henning, Rose Auslander, Stephanie McCarley Dugger, Lisa Suhair Majaj, and contest winner Aekta Khubchandani.

Head on over to Baltimore Review‘s website to read the Winter 2022 issue.

The Adroit Journal – No. 40

In this issue of The Adroit Journal, find poetry by Chen Chen, Eugenia Leigh, David Ehmcke, Sarah Fatimah Mohammed, Melissa Cundieff, Rose Alcalá, Monica Gomery, Gustav Parker Hibbett, Arielle Kaplan, Patrick Donnelly, Mark Kyungsoo Bias, Rick Barot, and more; prose by Kim Fu, Erin Sherry, Alyssa Asquith, Marcus Ong Kah Ho, Daniel Riddle Rodriguez, and Ann-Marie Blanchard; and art by Kathy Morris, Jack Jacques, Claire Hahn, Scarlett Cai, and others.

Plus five interviews that you can learn more about at The Adroit Journal website.

The MacGuffin – Fall/Winter 2021

Nancy Buffum’s “Girl at Piano” on the cover of vol. 37.3 is a prelude to the trio of musical poetry in the exposition to this issue, composed by poets Frank Jamison, Tobey Hiller, and Vince Gotera. As with any other sonata, the recapitulation comes later—András Schiff through Murray Silverstein’s eyes; guitarists, off-stage (Berlioz anyone?) in Gabriella Graceffo’s “Relics”; extended vocal technique in Eric Rasmussen’s “The Irresistible Gobble”—but not before Lucy Zhang’s multi-part “Trigger” and Lynn Domina’s multi-peninsula “Yooper Love” develop the form a bit. Finally, we reach the coda, this time a scherzo: “The Slapathon,” from J.A. Bernstein.

Read more at The MacGuffin website.

Cutleaf – Vol 2 No 2

In this issue of Cutleaf, Yasmina Din Madden shows us the ABCs of relational ups and downs in “Zero Sum Game.” Tiffany Melanson reflects on color theory in and out of prison in four poems beginning with “Visitation: Tomoka Correctional Institution.” And Mary Zheng navigates the necessary pain of empathy in the emergency room in “Jane.”

Learn about this issue’s images at the Cutleaf website.

The Massachusetts Review – Winter 2021

This special issue is dedicated to the climate crisis and those being destroyed and changed by it. Work by Shailja Patel, Vanessa Place, Omar El Akkad, Rick Bass, Alex Kuo, CAConrad, Barry Lopez, Laura Dassow Walls, Craig Santos Perez, Salar Abdoh, Brian Turner, Lisa Olstein, Joseph Earl Thomas, Khairani Barokka, Amitav Ghosh, Marta Buchaca, Mercedes Dorame, Rob Nixon, Gina Apostol, and more. See a full list of contributors at The Massachusetts Review website.

Kenyon Review – Jan/Feb 2022

The Jan/Feb 2022 issue of the Kenyon Review features the winners of our 2021 Short Fiction Contest: Ted Mathys, Sam Zafris, Rachel L. Robbins, and Malavika Shetty; stories by Vanessa Chan, Lan Samantha Chang, Drew Johnson, and Joanna Pearson; essays by Melissa Chadburn, Beth Ann Fennelly, and Alice Jones; and poems by Ruth Awad, Cameron Awkward-Rich, Traci Brimhall, Katie Hartsock, Cate Marvin, Maggie Millner, Michael Prior, Natasha Sajé, and Joan Wickersham. Now at the Kenyon Review website.

Kaleidoscope – No. 84

In this issue, we see a common thread of resilience. Humor and an appreciation for the little things are along for the ride. Featured essay by Kavitha Yaga Buggana. Featured art by Sandy Palmer. Fiction by Kelly A. Harmon, Lind McMullen, and Courtney B. Cook; a personal essay by Jackie D. Rust; creative nonfiction by Judy Kronenfeld, Laura Kiesel, Kristin LaFollette, and Tereza Crvenkovic; and a book review by Nanaz Khosrowshahi. Poetry by Alan Balter, Lucia Haase, John Dycus, Linda Fuchs, Diane S. Morelli, Alana Visser, Wren Tuatha, and T.L. Murphy.

Download the new issue PDF at the Kaleidoscope website.

The Georgia Review – Winter 2021

The Georgia Review’s Winter 2021 issue with new writing from Morgan Talty, Victoria Chang, Cheryl Clarke, Ira Sukrungruang, Garrett Hongo, Edward Hirsch, and many more, as well a story by Maya Alexandrovna Kucherskaya translated from the Russian, two iconic speeches from the early years of the OutWrite literary conference, and the winner of this year’s Loraine Williams Poetry Prize.

More info at The Georgia Review website.

Ruminate – Issue 60

The writers and artists whose work makes up Ruminate Issue 60 probe the imagery and metaphor of being at sea. Included are Devon Miller-Duggan’s poem, “Perhaps a Prayer for Surviving the Night” and Peggy Shumaker’s “Gifts We Cannot Keep.” George Choundas’s engrossing story, “Katingo Carried 15,980 Tons and Gentleman,” transports us to the world of those who live and work on cargo ships. And O-Jeremiah Agbaakin’s poem, “landscape with broken ekphrasis,” muses on the image of the last ship that brought enslaved people to the United States. This issue features the winning story from our 2021 William Van Dyke Short Story Prize.

More info at the Ruminate website.

Plume – Feb 2022

This month’s featured selection: “On Long Poems, Lyric Sequences, and ‘Cop’”; An interview with Connie Voisine by Amanda Newell. Mark Wagenaar reviews Carmine Starnino’s Dirty Words. In nonfiction: “Reading the Qur’an with Rumi” by Amer Latif. This month’s poetry contributors include Ira Sadoff, John Hodgen, Katja Gorečan, Pablo Piñero Stillmann, Bhisham Bherwani, Kelli Russell Agodon, Brendan Constantine, and more. Find this issue at the Plume website.

Cutleaf – Issue 2.1

In our first issue of 2022, Ben Kaufman searches for the ghost in the machine as he questions the way language and meaning changes through time in “Unknown Caller.” Pauletta Hansel views various effects of trying to live as the marrow in someone else’s bones in three poems beginning with “So Maybe It’s True.” And George Singleton shares the story of a boy named Renfro who wants only to earn his driver’s license and to reconcile his odd parents in “Here’s a Little Song.”

Learn about this issue’s images at the Cutleaf website.

Delectable Poetry by Dorothy Chan

I love Dorothy Chan’s poetry, so I’m always excited to see her name in a lit mag’s table of contents. Two of her poems are included in the Fall/Winter 2021 issue of Colorado Review: “You Might Change Your Mind About Kids” and “Triple Sonnet for Batman Villains and Whatever This Is.”

In “You Might Change Your Mind About Kids,” the speaker is told this titular sentence by a man she has a romantic relationship with. The poem is the mental dissection of his opinion on this topic, an inner rebellion broiling beneath the surface. Who is this man to claim her body, her future, her future child? How is she seen as “the place to reserve / for a baby, the hotel for a womb?” She feels palpable derision toward his assumptions and I love that clarity of the speaker knowing exactly what she wants and does not want. She’s not going to change for this man or any other man and she finishes the poem with, “If I ever love someone, I’ll be baby forever.”

“Triple Sonnet for Batman Villains and Whatever This Is” is such a fun poem that still holds a hefty dose of seriousness in its final stanza. This poem has one thing I always enjoy about Chan’s poetry which is the absolute pleasure of experiencing different foods. These two pieces are just as delectable as “sashimi and Snow / Beauty sake and mango mochi for dessert.”

Try Your Hand at a Glosa with Page & Pappadà

Guest Post by Elda Pappadà.

I discovered P.K. Page about two years ago, and since then this talented, prolific writer has become one of my favorite poets. I was determined to read all her poetry books when I came across: Coal and Roses: Twenty-One Glosas. Glosa (Glose) is a Spanish form of poetry where the author quotes a quatrain from an existing poet and writes four ten-line stanzas with the four lines acting as a refrain in the final line of each stanza. Therefore, the first line from the quatrain would be the final line in the first stanza, and etc.  The last word at the end of the sixth and ninth lines must also rhyme with the last word in the borrowed tenth line.

Coal & Roses was a captivating find. P. K. Page manages to keep the flow continuous and writes with such ease, originality, and skill. It is very interesting to see the final product. A Glosa can keep the same tone as the original quatrain or can take a whole new path and narrative. I tried my own hand at writing a Glosa and found it to be rather liberating with unlimited possibilities. The final product was unlike most poetry I have ever written.


Coal and Roses: Twenty-One Glosas by P. K. Page. The Porcupine’s Quill, 2009.

Reviewer bio: Elda Pappadà has self-published her first poetry book, Freedom – about love, loss, and understanding. Freedom is about finding meaning in the highs and lows of everyday life, to learn and even re-learn what we need to move forward.  It’s about defining life and giving weight to everything we do.

The Writing Disorder – Winter 2021/22

Winter is upon us and so is the new issue of The Writing Disorder. Find “Aesthetic Transmissions,” an interview with Robert Hass by George Guida; fiction by Robert Boucheron, Inez Hollander, Justin Reamer, Jeff Underwood, and more; poetry by Holly Day, Ash Ellison, Jonah Meyer, Bruce Parker, Frederick Pollack, and Kate Porter; nonfiction by Joan Frank, Donna Talarico, and Emilio Williams; and art by Nick Bryant.

World Literature Today – Jan 2022

Muscogee writer Cynthia Leitich Smith headlines the January 2022 issue with a reflective essay on “Decolonizing Neverland” in YA lit. Also inside, Fowzia Karimi finds a “small flame” of hope in Afghanistan, while other essays survey Vanuatu women writers, China’s minority fiction, and the new Van Gogh exhibition at the Dalí Museum. Additional highlights include interviews with African writers Masiyaleti Mbewe and Henrietta Rose-Innes, fiction from Iran and Japan, and poetry from Colombia, Ivory Coast, and Siberia. As always, more than twenty book reviews.

More info at World Literature Today website.

The Shore – Winter 2021

This winter’s new issue of The Shore marks our third full year of publication! In it is glistening poetry by Shannon K. Winston, Marlo Starr, Lynne Ellis, Kyle Vaughn, Eunice Lee, Lauren K. Carlson, Fatima Jafar, Taiwo Hassan, Stefanie Kirby, Charles Hensler, Simon Perchik, Stephen Ruffus, Kathryn Knight Sonntag, Amy Williams, Meghan Kemp-Gee, Matthew Murrey, David Dodd Lee, Lorrie Ness, Julia Schorr, Jake Bailey, Katie Kemple, C.C. Russell, Adam Deutsch, Nick Visconti, Andrea Krause, Sam Moe, Patrick Wright, Brittney Corrigan, and more. Find a full list of contributors at The Shore website.

Driftwood Press – Issue 9.1

Driftwood Press‘s latest short stories “Wing Breaker” by Rachel Phillippo and “Spanish Soap Operas Killed My Mother” by Dailihana Alfonseca take you from brutal arctic traditions to the cultural traumas of migrants in America. This issue also collects some of the most insightful and harrowing poetry being written today; these poems delve into illness, motherhood, religious pressure, and much more. Wrapping up the issue are visual arts and comics by Io Weurich, Kelsey M. Evans, SAMO Collective, Jim Still-Pepper, Andrew White, Kimball Anderson, & Casey Jo Stohrer. Now at the Driftwood Press website.

Cleaver Magazine – No. 36

Our Wintry Mix. Creative nonfiction by Bree Smith, Dhaea Kang, Christine Muller, Benedicte Grima, and Virginia Petrucci; flash by Eliot Li, Gabriella Souza, Cassie Burkhardt, and others; fiction by Amy Savage, Kim Magowan, and Maggie Hill; and poetry by Peter Grandbois, Kelley White, Brenda Taulbee, and more. Learn about this issue’s visual work at the Cleaver Magazine website.

Big Muddy – No. 21

This issue of Big Muddy includes work by Brian Baumgart, August B. Clark, Charlotte Covey, Mark Fabiano, Doris Ferleger, Spencer Fleury, Jennifer Gravely, Ian T. Hall, D.E. Kern, Bronson Lemer, Paul Luikart, Leah Mccormack, Matt Mcgowan, Luke Rolfes, Rosalia Scalia, Christine Stewart-Nuñez, Katie Strine, Rachel Tramonte, Carol Tyx, Christian Vazquez, Daniel Webre, Adam D. Weeks, Holden Tyler Wright, and Kirby Michael Wright.

Find more info at the Big Muddy website.

Event :: Still Time to Get Tickets to 2022 Virtual Palm Beach Poetry Festival

Screenshot of Palm Beach Poetry Festival 2022 Flier for the NewPages LitPak
click image to open full-size flier

Event Dates: January 10-15, 2022
Event Location: Virtual
18th Annual Virtual Palm Beach Poetry Festival, January 10-15, 2022. Focus on your work with America’s most engaging and award-winning poets. Workshops with Kim Addonizio, Laure-Anne Bosselaar, Chard deNiord, Mark Doty, Yona Harvey, John Murillo, Matthew Olzmann, and Diane Seuss. One-On-One Conferences with Lorna Blake, Sally Bliumis Dunn, Nickole Brown, Jessica Jacobs, and Angela Narciso Torres. A special Craft Talk by Kwame Dawes, Special Guest Poet, Yusef Komunyakaa. Poet-at-Large, Aimee Nezhukumatathil. To find out more, visit www.palmbeachpoetryfestival.org. Individual event tickets as well as full conference packages still available.

Valley Voices – 21.2

This issue’s Special Feature is “Beyond Illusory Space” by Albert Wong, who is also interviewed by John Zheng. Lauri Scheyer interviews Lenard D. Moore. In Haibun & Tanka Prose: Rich Youmans, Keith Polette, Ce Rosenow, and Terri L. French. Poetry by Elizabeth Burk, Ambrielle Butler, Andrea DEeken, Theodore Haddin, Charlene Langfur, Ann Lauinger, George Looney, Ted McCormack, Adam Moore, Steve Myers, Dan Pettee, Margo Taft Stever, and Jason Visconti. Find prose contributors at the Valley Voices website.

New England Review – 42.4

Last year at this time we released our first issue dedicated to emerging writers, and now with 42.4 we’ve done it again. While this issue offers up the range of voices, genres, and styles New England Review promises every quarter, this time that mission is accomplished by writers who won’t be recognizable to most readers, that is, they’ve not yet published a book or full-length collection. Find a selection of this year’s contributors at the New England Review website.

Glass Mountain – Fall 2021

Volume 27 is out with art by Isabella Celentano, David Dodd Lee, Weining Wang, Emily Fannin, Nicole Choi, and more; poetry by Jose Wilson, Tom War, Tobias Tegrotenhuis, David Romanda, Riley Morrison, Annie Martin, Delaney Kelly, Ambrose Day, and Lorelei Bacht; and prose by Amber Barney, Nicole Collingwood, Devan Hawkins, Haley Herzberg, Hannah Lindsay, Khalid McCalla, Adia Muhammad, Elena Negrón, and Beatrix Zwolfer. Plus the winners of the Robertson Prize. More info at the Glass Mountain website.

Poetry – Dec 2021

In this issue: Suzi F. Garcia, Taylor Johnson, Tamara Panici, Bryan Byrdlong, John Lee Clark, Angelo Mao, Simon Shieh, Kelan Nee, Lilly Bechtel, Eleanor Stanford, Paul Hlava Ceballos, Aurielle Marie, Julian Randall, Diannely Antigua, Alexis V. Jackson, Ugochukwu Damian Okpara, Steven Espada Dawson, and Camille Carter. See “Respect the Mic” contributors at the Poetry website.

The Malahat Review – Autumn 2021

The Autumn 2021 issue is here featuring the winner of our 2021 Far Horizons Award for Short Fiction. Poetry by Y. S. Lee, Laurie D. Graham, Yuan Changming, Sebastien Wen, Allison LaSorda, Danielle Hubbard, Elisabeth Gill, Rozina Jessa, Sue J. Levon, and morej, as well as fiction by Jenny Ferguson, Sara Mang, and Cassidy McFadzean. Find more contributors at The Malahat Review website.

Crazyhorse – Fall 2021

Featuring the 2021 Crazyhorse prize winners in fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, Mary Clark, Jung Hae Chae, and Mark Wagenaar; a debut story from Nancy Nguyen; fiction from Nicole VanderLinden, Weston Cutter, and Timothy Mullaney; an essay from A.C. Zhang; and poems from Lisa Low, Michael Prior, Mary Kaiser, Jose Hernandez Diaz, and Mehrnoosh Torbatnejad, among others. Now on Crazyhorse website.

Plume – No. 124

This month’s featured selection: “Jewish American Women Poets” by Sally Bliumis-Dunn featuring Jennifer Barber, Jessica Greenbaum, Judy Katz and Nomi Stone. In nonfiction: “All These Red and Yellow Things: Short Papers on Art by Lesle Lewis.” Jeri Theriault reviews Devon Walker-Figueroa’s Philomath. See a selection of this month’s poets at the Plume website.

The Lake – December 2021

The December issue is now online featuring Dan Brook, Gavan Duffy, Edilson A. Ferreira, Nels Hanson, Amy Holman, Tom Kelly, Deborah Kennedy, Charles Rammelkamp, Michael Salcman, Kerrin P. Sharpe, Andrew Sheilds, J. R. Solonche, Marjory Woodfield. Reviews of Michael Salcman’s Shades and Graces and Judith Wilson’s Fleet. Learn more about this issue’s reviews at The Lake website.

Cutleaf – Volume 1 Issue 22

In this issue, Barrett Bowlin chronicles the pain of parenthood through a child’s “Milk Teeth.” Julia Halprin Jackson writes about the relationships we have with our bodies, and the decisions that our cells sometimes make without us in “Scouting.” And Elijah Burrell merges his love and knowledge of music with the mysterious longings of friendship in three poems beginning with “Even the Best Records Have Gaps Between the Tracks.” Learn about this issue’s images at the Cutleaf website.

2021 Rattle Poetry Prize Winners

The Winter 2021 issue of Rattle features the Rattle Poetry Prize winner and finalists.

Winner
“Encephalon” by Ann Giard-Chase

Finalists
“After My Teenager Tries to Kill Herself . . .” by Elizabeth Johnston Ambrose
“This Is How I Make My Money” by Heather Bell
“Do You Have Children?” by Susan Browne
“Follow Me” by Rayon Lennon
“Black Boys as Fireflies” by Dayna Hodge Lynch
“White Privilege Skydives with Black Guy in Appalachia” by Mary Meadows
“The Internet of Things” by Erin Murphy
“Exodus: Gilliam Coal Camp, West Virginia, 1949” by L. Renée
“Purgatorio” by Zella Rivas
“My Father Transformed by Dying” by Richard Westheimer

Subscribers to Rattle can vote for their favorite out of the finalists to determine the winner of the $5,000 Readers’ Choice Award. The voting deadline is February 1.

An Intimate Look at Being Human

Guest Post by Antonio Addessi.

In Anatomy of Want, Lee takes us deep into the intimacy between lovers, the memories they create, hold on to and try to forget but can’t. Through his talent for noticing the small details of everyday life, he arouses all of the senses, often on the same line or stanza.

In poems like “Compliments to the Cook” and “La Cocina,” Lee wafts the scents of fragrant food into our noses and holds up the spoon to our mouths to taste the poems coming off the pages. The longing to love and be loved is stitched tightly into each line as we’re carried through cityscapes with lively streets and dark bedrooms with empty beds all reminding us of lovers lost.

Anatomy of Want is an enticing and heartfelt ode to what it means to give part of yourself to the people you allow close to you. In it we see ourselves as the speaker, the holder of secrets and the teller of truths sometimes hard to swallow. The nostalgia exudes itself onto every page—evoked by memories of sorrow and loss, of growing up too fast and living in an often foreign feeling state that is strangely familiar. Its Americana places us deep in the heart of Manhattan’s subway systems and the long aisles of grocery stores filled with people that infinitely stay strangers. This book is definitely on the edge of what poetry is going to look and feel like for years to come. It is one that deserves to be read and reread for it’s intimate look at what being human truly is.


Anatomy of Want by Daniel W. K. Lee. Rebel Satori Press, 2019.

Reviewer bio: Antonio Addessi is a poet and writer living in New York City. He received his MFA from Columbia University (’20) and his debut book of poetry Sleeptalking, published by Rebel Satori Press, comes out April 2022.

Rattle – Winter 2021

The Winter 2021 issue features our 11 Rattle Poetry Prize winners. The open section features the usual wide-ranging poems with humor and heart. These poems cover love, evolution, Robin Hood, and the DMV. The conversation section takes an unusual turn, where psychologist James Pennebaker discusses his lifetime of research on the benefits of expressive writing. Learn more at the Rattle website.

Baltimore Review – Fall 2021

New issue of Baltimore Review with new poetry by Iqra Khan, Gerry LaFemina, Caroline Pittman, Dannye Romine Powell, Emily Franklin, Merna Dyer Skinner, John Glowney, and Janet Jennings; fiction by J.T. Robertson, Madison Jozefiak, Nicholas Maistros, and Justine Chan; and creative nonfiction by Brandon Hansen, Morgan Florsheim, and Kerry Folan.

More info at the Baltimore Review website.

Alaska Quarterly Review – Summer & Fall 2021

In this issue, find the novella “Like a Bomb Went Off” by Kristopher Jansma. Stories by Mackenzie McGee, Nathan Curtis Roberts, Jonathan Starke, Ada Zhang, Matt Greene, Heather Monley, and Laurie Baker. Essays by Jehanne Dubrow, Dawn Davies, Jane McCafferty, Alex Chertok, Kirsten Reneau, Jai Dulani, and Sara Eliza Johnson. One long poem by Bruce Bond, and other poems by Felicia Zamora, Lara Egger, and more. Find more poetry contributors at the Alaska Quarterly Review website.

Nimrod International Journal’s 2021 Prize Winners

Issue 43 of Nimrod International Journal is all about award winners! Check out the winners and finalists of the Katherine Anne Porter Prize for Fiction and the Pablo Neruda Prize for Poetry.

The Katherine Anne Porter Prize for Fiction

First Prize
“White Black People” by Celine Aenlle-Rocha

Second Prize
“The Inventories” by Paula Closson Buck

Honorable Mentions
“A Dolphin in Pain” by Rachel Furey
“God Is In Your Body” by Rachel Reeher

Finalists
“Wife Of; or, What Does It Mean to Be Haunted?” by Jennifer Blackman
“The Southern Part of the State” by Teresa Milbrodt
“Thug” by Edvin Subašić

The Pablo Neruda Prize for Poetry

First Prize
“Spell for Patience” and other poems by Emily Rose Cole

Second Prize
“Now” by Julie Marie Wade

Honorable Mentions
“Vanishing Point” and other poems by Laura Apol
“Like a Friend” and other poems by Francesca Bell
“Everything I Love I Want to Consume” and other poems by Angela Sucich

Event :: Get Your Tickets for the 2022 Virtual Palm Beach Poetry Festival

Screenshot of Palm Beach Poetry Festival 2022 Flier for the NewPages LitPak
click image to open full-size flier

18th Annual Virtual Palm Beach Poetry Festival is taking place January 10-15, 2022. Focus on your work with America’s most engaging and award-winning poets. Workshops with Kim Addonizio, Laure-Anne Bosselaar, Chard deNiord, Mark Doty, Yona Harvey, John Murillo, Matthew Olzmann, and Diane Seuss. One-On-One Conferences with Lorna Blake, Sally Bliumis Dunn, Nickole Brown, Jessica Jacobs, and Angela Narciso Torres. A special Craft Talk by Kwame Dawes, Special Guest Poet, Yusef Komunyakaa. Poet-at-Large, Aimee Nezhukumatathil. To find out more, visit www.palmbeachpoetryfestival.org. There’s still time to purchase tickets to individual events and apply for a one-on-one conference!

Weber – Fall 2021

The Fall 2021 issue of Weber features a Bernard DeVoto Subfocus which includes an interview with Mark DeVoto, as well as work by Mark Harvey, Nate Schweber, David Rich Lewis, Russell Burrows, and Val Holley. Also in this issue: poetry by Christian Woodard, Eric Paul Shaffer, Stephen Lefebure, Taylor Graham, Joseph Powell, Angelica Alain, and more; and essays by Adam M. Sowards and Ralph Hardy. Find fiction contributors at the Weber website.

November 2021 eLitPak :: 2022 Virtual Palm Beach Poetry Festival

Screenshot of Palm Beach Poetry Festival 2022 Flier for the NewPages LitPak
click image to open full-size flier

Virtual festival takes place January 10-15, 2022. Focus on your work with America’s most engaging and award-winning poets. Workshops with Kim Addonizio, Laure-Anne Bosselaar, Chard deNiord, Mark Doty, Yona Harvey, John Murillo, Matthew Olzmann, and Diane Seuss. Apply to attend a one-on-one conference by December 1. Special Craft Talk by Kwame Dawes, Special Guest Poet Yusef Komunyakaa. Poet-at-Large, Aimee Nezhukumatathil. Find out more at our website.

View the full November 2021 eLitPak Newsletter.

wildness – November 2021

Featuring some wonderful poetry, fiction, and narrative nonfiction from: Geoff Anderson, Shuang Ang, Claudia Delfina Cardona, Aaron Caycedo-Kimura, Stephanie Chang, Bryce Emley, Miguel Barretto García, Janalyn Guo, Bill Hollands, Ricardo Frasso Jaramillo, Karishma Jobanputra, Ravi Mangla, Shannan Mann, Sham-e-Ali Nayeem, Robert Okaji, D. A. Powell, Monica Prince, and AM Ringwalt. Find this issue at the wildness website.