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At the NewPages Blog readers and writers can catch up with their favorite literary and alternative magazines, independent and university presses, creative writing programs, and writing and literary events. Find new books, new issue announcements, contest winners, and so much more!

Lit Mag Covers :: Picks of the Week – May 27, 2024

Lit Mag Covers: Picks of the Week recognizes cover art and designs for literary magazines, whether in print or online. These are chosen solely at the discretion of the Editor. Enjoy!

The Spring 2024 issue of Pleiades (44.1) features “On Disability,” a special folio edited by Kennedy Horton and Olivia Ellisor, beginning with the cover art by Lacey Lynn Tink: “Organic transitions of her body, coming to terms with disabling chronic illnesses, and other lived experiences are cataloged and processed through the images that she makes.”

The newest issue of Rattle poetry magazine offers a perfect tribute to summer with Edward Fielding’s cover art, “Blueberry Baskets” (2014).

The Amphibian Literary and Art Journal Issue 6 is themed “Healing” and features “pretty cover art for your eyes” by Daniel Ablitt.


Find out more about many of these titles with our Guide to Literary Magazines and our Big List of Literary Magazines and Big List of Alternative Magazines. If you are a publication looking to be listed in our monthly roundup or featured on our blog and social media, please contact us.

Book Review :: Help Wanted by Adelle Waldman

Review by Kevin Brown

It’s clear from Adelle Waldman’s second novel, Help Wanted, that she has worked in retail before, specifically in the warehouse section. Her story follows a small group of workers who arrive before the big-box store, Town Square, opens, so they can unload the truck, break down the boxes, and stock the shelves. While the plot focuses on the question of who will become the new general manager and, thus, which of the main cast of characters would take over as the manager of Movement—the business-speak title for the warehouse team—the real heart of the novel are the characters and their struggles.

They struggled in school, whether because they were uninterested, had undiagnosed learning disabilities, or encountered financial or family hardships, leading their lives to end up in the warehouse. Some of them are divorced and juggle childcare obligations; some are single and trying to figure out how to create a life; all of them have dreams, even if that’s nothing more than to move up one rung in the Town Square corporate ladder.

The backdrop for the novel heightens their concerns even more, as Potterstown, where the store is located, has never recovered from the 2008 financial crash and companies’ decisions to move to other countries, where labor costs are cheaper. And, of course, there’s the competition with the online retailer, whom the characters never name.

The team does find moments of joy and companionship, especially when they are all working toward a common goal that they, not management, define, but the book is not ultimately hopeful. Instead, Waldman creates real characters with real struggles that will persist for most, if not all, of their lives. She bears witness to the realities of those who work in the warehouse of the world, where most of us never think to look.


Help Wanted by Adelle Waldman. W.W. Norton, March 2024.

Reviewer bio: Kevin Brown has published three books of poetry: Liturgical Calendar: Poems (Wipf and Stock); A Lexicon of Lost Words (winner of the Violet Reed Haas Prize for Poetry, Snake Nation Press); and Exit Lines (Plain View Press). He also has a memoir, Another Way: Finding Faith, Then Finding It Again, and a book of scholarship, They Love to Tell the Stories: Five Contemporary Novelists Take on the Gospels. Twitter @kevinbrownwrite

Book Review :: Anita de Monte Laughs Last by Xochitl Gonzalez

Review by Kevin Brown

Xochitl Gonzalez’s second novel, Anita de Monte Laughs Last, tells two parallel stories about women in the art world. The titular Anita de Monte is a Latina artist on the rise in the middle of the 1980s, but she’s married to Jack Martin, a well-established, minimalist artist known as much for his affairs as his art. Raquel Toro is a college student at Brown University in the late 1990s, just beginning work on her undergraduate thesis, which will focus on Jack Martin. Her experience as a Latina in a white-dominated university and department has led to her alienation, both from those around her and from her culture and background.

Anita disappears from art history after her death until Raquel, with guidance from Belinda—the director of the Rhode Island School of Design’s gallery, as well as another woman of color—rediscovers Anita’s work, as well as more details about her death. Raquel’s life had already begun to mirror Anita’s, as she begins dating Nick, a graduating senior with a promising art career before him, though it’s driven more by connections than talent. Though Nick is not a mirror for Jack, he is an echo, a reminder of the men who have tried to control female artists and the narrative of art history.

Raquel’s discovery of Anita de Monte not only resurrects Anita’s reputation, but also helps Raquel begin to discover who she is and who she can be. Through her two main characters, Gonzalez crafts realistic portrayals of the challenges women have and continue to face, along with the importance of role models as one means of pushing through those struggles.


Anita de Monte Laughs Last by Xochitl Gonzalez. Flatiron Books, March 2024.

Reviewer bio: Kevin Brown has published three books of poetry: Liturgical Calendar: Poems (Wipf and Stock); A Lexicon of Lost Words (winner of the Violet Reed Haas Prize for Poetry, Snake Nation Press); and Exit Lines (Plain View Press). He also has a memoir, Another Way: Finding Faith, Then Finding It Again, and a book of scholarship, They Love to Tell the Stories: Five Contemporary Novelists Take on the Gospels. Twitter @kevinbrownwrite


Where to Submit Roundup: May 24, 2024

39 Submission Opportunities including calls for submissions, writing contests, and book prizes.

Memorial Day weekend is upon us. We at NewPages hope that you have a fun and safe holiday weekend. If you do not have any traveling and gathering plans, but are utilizing time off for writing, editing, and submitting, NewPages is here for you with our weekly roundup of submission opportunities. Since next week does end May, don’t forget to check out all the May 31 and June 1 deadlines before it is too late.

Paid newsletter subscribers can get early access to the majority of submission opportunities and upcoming events before they go live on our site, so do consider subscribing or upgrading your subscription today. You also receive our monthly eLitPak Newsletter which features even more opportunities and other literary goodness.

Continue reading “Where to Submit Roundup: May 24, 2024”

Editor’s Choice :: Black Fire This Time Volume 2

Black Fire This Time, Volume 2, Ed. Derrick Harriell and Kofi Antwi
Willow Books, March 2024

Willow Books has announced the release of Black Fire This Time, Volume 2 (2024) edited by Derrick Harriell with Assistant Editor Kofi Antwi with an introduction by Mona Lisa Saloy. The second in a series celebrating the history and legacy of the Black Arts movement, Volume 2 continues to showcase the works of multiple generations, from the founders of the movement to contemporary writers in the tradition. Hailed as the “New Golden Age of Black Writing,” the Black Fire This Time series is an unprecedented collection of the best in writing by black writers. Featured writers in the series include Sonia Sanchez, Ishmael Reed, Amiri Baraka, Gwendolyn Brooks, Lucille Clifton, 2023 American Book Award winner Everett Hoagland and 75 new poets, dramatists and fiction writers from across the country. Black Fire This Time Volume 2 will be distributed by the University of Mississippi Press.

To discover more great books from small, independent, and university presses, visit the NewPages Guide to Publishers as well as our Books Received monthly roundup. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to stay up to date!

Sponsored :: New Book :: Knowing

cover of Knowing by Mark Cox

Knowing: Poems, Poetry by Mark Cox

Press 53, April 2024

Mark Cox pulls no punches in these poems about family, relationships, loss, regret, growing older and our human condition, generally. Sometimes wry, sometimes tender, always thought provoking, Knowing is the seventh volume of poetry from a lauded veteran poet who has been publishing prominently for almost 40 years.

Previous Praise for Mark Cox:

On Readiness

Thrilling prose poems from a cherished writer . . . . Cox gives lie to the common notion that prose poetry is too formless to count as real verse . . . . [He] is as careful with diction, rhythm, and even rhyme as one might be if they were writing strict alexandrines-and yet, his poems are as fluid and readable as Jack Kerouac’s novels.

Kirkus Reviews

On Sorrow Bread

Tony Hoagland has said Mark Cox is “a veteran of the deep water; there’s no one like him,” and Thomas Lux identified him as “one of the finest poets of his generation.” No one speaks more effectively of the vital and enduring syntaxes of common, even communal, life.

Richard Simpson

New Lit on the Block :: Magazine1

Newly launched biannual online Magazine1 operates out of Bookstore1 in Sarasota, Florida (hence the name) and publishes fiction, nonfiction, poetry, visual art, and hybrid works. “We’re really open to anything if you have something you don’t think fits nicely into the above categories,” says Editor-in-Chief Ben Kerns. Connections are what matter to Kerns, who hopes readers of Magazine1 are able to connect with something they didn’t think they’d connect with at first glance. “I hope that when we feature stranger pieces or pieces that make the reader reach a little further, that someone out there who encounters them for the first time can find their world widened a little bit by them.”

Continue reading “New Lit on the Block :: Magazine1”

Magazine Stand :: Hole in the Head re:View – 5.2

Hole in the Head re:View continues to celebrate their 5th year with a blooming May issue that announces Dana Levin as judge of the 2nd annual Charles Simic Prize for Poetry and Richard Foerster as guest editor of their August 2024 issue. Readers stopping by will also find art, photography, and poetry contributions that include Walt Whitman, a film by Lior Locher, small animals, a polyphony of oak and owl, a weird scream, a wobbly loose tooth, moth tea time, lost skirts and shoes, Aroostook County, lungs, a basketball court, pancakes, Frankenstein’s bride, earth science, salsa dancing, flipping fish, a rooster, handmaids everywhere, the downside of choosing a Frank Sinatra song to play at a funeral, Leningrad 1983, other favorite covers, Michael Hettich interviews Eric Nelson…and so much more!

Find out more about many of these titles with our Guide to Literary Magazines and our Big List of Literary Magazines and Big List of Alternative Magazines. If you are a publication looking to be listed in our monthly roundup or featured on our blog and social media, please contact us.

Sponsored :: New Book :: Exits

cover of Exits by Stephen Pollock

Exits: Selected Poems, Poetry by Stephen C. Pollock

Windtree Press, June 2023

Stephen C. Pollock’s poetry collection Exits explores the beauty and frailty of life, the cycles of nature, and the potential for renewal. It also responds to contemporary anxieties surrounding death and the universal search for meaning. 

Musical and multilayered, Exits features a potpourri of styles, ranging from traditional forms to free verse to hybrid works. Many of the images are drawn from nature. In addition, each poem is paired with a piece of artwork intended to resonate with the writing and enhance the reader’s experience.

Exits has been honored with the Gold Medal for poetry in the 2023 Readers’ Favorite International Book Awards and the Silver Medal for poetry in the 2024 Feathered Quill Book Awards. Echoing these accolades, Midwest Book Review declares: “Exits is a book that has profoundly impacted the literary world.”

“Pollock’s poetry is brilliant”
—Kristiana Reed, editor-in-chief, Free Verse Revolution

“Exits exemplifies the musicality of language”
—Foreword-Clarion Reviews

“Full of wit, insight and provocative imagery, Exits is a masterful collection”
—IndieReader, 5.0 stars

Visit exitspoetry.net to learn more about the book.

Magazine Stand :: Agni – 99

The newest issue of AGNI (99) focuses on the places that remain. Contributors struggle with displacement and “home,” belonging and having to establish, resisting and being able to simply be. Partly devoted to a major new portfolio of writing from the Central American and Mexican diasporas, AGNI 99 unites around bewilderment and the force of clarity—discovering how we landed here and acknowledging where we stand. Geography extends beyond the folio, in poems by Mosab Abu Toha and Mercè Rodoreda (trans. Rebecca Simpson); fiction by Steven Archer and Urvi Kumbhat; essays by Lia Purpura and Marion Winik; and more. Diego Isaias Hernández Méndez, Guatemala’s “accident painter,” sets the vivacity and tumble right in front of us, on the cover.

Find out more about many of these titles with our Guide to Literary Magazines and our Big List of Literary Magazines and Big List of Alternative Magazines. If you are a publication looking to be listed in our monthly roundup or featured on our blog and social media, please contact us.

Book Review :: The Heaven and Earth Grocery Store by James McBride

Review by Kevin Brown

The Heaven and Earth Grocery Store, James McBride’s latest novel, centers around a small community in Pottstown, Pennsylvania, in the early and middle twentieth century. The neighborhood of Chicken Hill is changing, first from a largely Jewish area to a primarily African American one, but then even that dichotomy breaks down with a significant influx of Eastern European Jews who don’t always see the world the same way the older immigrant community does.

Moshe bridges the original divide, as he owns a theatre that once hosted vaudeville acts, but then transitioned to Black bands as demand grew. His primary employee is Nate, a Black man, who helps Moshe work across the racial divide. However, the main impetus for Moshe’s doing so is his wife, Chona, who runs the titular grocery store. She encourages (forces, really) Moshe to leave the grocery store in the neighborhood even as its demographics change, and she becomes the face of welcome to anyone who walks in.

She even makes Moshe hide Dodo, Nate and Addie’s deaf nephew, when the state comes to take him away, a decision that will lead to much of the conflict in the novel. However, Chona stands for the heaven and earth of the store, as she attempts to live out the love of God, the will of God, on earth, as it is in heaven, a message of inclusivity needed now as much as ever.


The Heaven and Earth Grocery Store by James McBride. Riverhead Books, August 2023.

Reviewer bio: Kevin Brown has published three books of poetry: Liturgical Calendar: Poems (Wipf and Stock); A Lexicon of Lost Words (winner of the Violet Reed Haas Prize for Poetry, Snake Nation Press); and Exit Lines (Plain View Press). He also has a memoir, Another Way: Finding Faith, Then Finding It Again, and a book of scholarship, They Love to Tell the Stories: Five Contemporary Novelists Take on the Gospels. Twitter @kevinbrownwrite

Contest and Submission Opportunity from Black Fox Literary Magazine!

Screenshot of Black Fox Literary Magazine's flyer for the NewPages May 2024 eLitPak newsletter
click image to open flyer

Deadlines: May 31, 2024; June 2, 2024
Submit your fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction to Black Fox Literary Magazine’s Montage of Misfortunes Fox Tales Prize! Deadline: June 2, 2024! We are also accepting free submissions for our summer 2024 print issue. Free subs close on May 31, 2024! View our flyer for more information and links to our submission guidelines.

Want early access to our eLitPak flyers? Subscribe to our weekly newsletter! You can also support NewPages with a paid subscription and get early access to the majority submission opportunities, upcoming events, and more before they are posted to our site.

Interested in advertising in the eLitPak? Learn more here.

Affordable Online Poetry, Publishing, & Critique Workshops / Poetry Editing & Mentoring

Caesura Poetry Workshop aims to support, inspire, and energize poets through a wide variety of affordable Zoom workshops hosted by award-winning poet, editor, and teacher John Sibley Williams. Most workshops include poem analysis, active group discussion, and writing prompts. Some are even self-paced! We also offer critiques of poems and manuscripts, as well as ongoing mentoring. Visit us at our website and view our flyer for more information.

Want early access to our eLitPak flyers? Subscribe to our weekly newsletter! You can also support NewPages with a paid subscription and get early access to the majority submission opportunities, upcoming events, and more before they are posted to our site.

Interested in advertising in the eLitPak? Learn more here.

$1000 prize & publication with Vine Leaves Press

Deadline: July 1, 2024
It is our responsibility to give marginalized groups the opportunity to establish literary legacies that feel rich and vast. Why? To sustain hope for the world to become a more loving, tolerable, and open space. It always begins with art. That is why we invite you to enter the 2025 International Voices in Creative Nonfiction Competition. Visit our website and view our flyer for more information.

Want early access to our eLitPak flyers? Subscribe to our weekly newsletter! You can also support NewPages with a paid subscription and get early access to the majority submission opportunities, upcoming events, and more before they are posted to our site.

Interested in advertising in the eLitPak? Learn more here.

2024 Charles Simic Prize for Poetry

screenshot of Hole in the Head Review's flyer for the 2024 Charles Simic Prize for Poetry
click image to open flyer

Deadline: July 31, 2024
We are pleased to announce that Dana Levin will judge the second annual Charles Simic Prize for Poetry. Dana is the author of five books of poetry and teaches for the Bennington Writing Seminars, the MFA program at Bennington College, and serves as Distinguished Writer in Residence at Maryville University in St. Louis. Dana recently published a recollection of Charlie as friend, teacher, and mentor in The Yale Review.
View our website and our flyer for more information.

Want early access to our eLitPak flyers? Subscribe to our weekly newsletter! You can also support NewPages with a paid subscription and get early access to the majority submission opportunities, upcoming events, and more before they are posted to our site.

Interested in advertising in the eLitPak? Learn more here.

Write in the Redwoods!

image of Lynne Golodner's flyer for the 2024 Redwoods Writing Retreat
click image to open full-flyer

Join Writing Coach & Author Lynne Golodner for five glorious days October 20-24, 2024, in the Redwood forests of northern California for a writers retreat that will change your life! Includes daily craft lessons, guided hikes and yoga in an intimate setting plus daily breakfast, two lunches and a celebratory final night dinner. NewPages readers are eligible for EARLY BIRD PRICING. View flyer to learn more and apply here. ONLY TWO SPOTS LEFT!

Want early access to our eLitPak flyers? Subscribe to our weekly newsletter! You can also support NewPages with a paid subscription and get early access to the majority submission opportunities, upcoming events, and more before they are posted to our site.

Interested in advertising in the eLitPak? Learn more here.

2024 Catamaran Poetry Prize for West Coast Poets

image of Catamaran Literary Reader's flyer for the 2024 Catamaran Poetry Prize for West Coast Poets
click image to open full-size flyer

Now in its 7th year, the Catamaran Poetry Prize is open to previously unpublished poetry manuscripts across a range of styles, themes, and forms. The prize is only open to West Coast poets living in California, Washington, Oregon, Alaska, and Hawaii. See our website and flyer for full details.

Want early access to our eLitPak flyers? Subscribe to our weekly newsletter! You can also support NewPages with a paid subscription and get early access to the majority submission opportunities, upcoming events, and more before they are posted to our site.

Interested in advertising in the eLitPak? Learn more here.

The Word Works May-June 2024 Open Reading Period!

screenshot of The Word Works May-June 2024 Open Reading Period flyer
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We are now accepting poetry manuscripts of 48-80 pages for our May-June Reading Period at The Word Works! Four to six books are selected for publication in the next two years. Single-author collections, collaborations, prose poetry, hybrid works, etc. are welcome. View our flyer for more information and a link to our submissions manager.

Want early access to our eLitPak flyers? Subscribe to our weekly newsletter! You can also support NewPages with a paid subscription and get early access to the majority submission opportunities, upcoming events, and more before they are posted to our site.

Interested in advertising in the eLitPak? Learn more here.

The Colorado Authors League

Screenshot of The Colorado Authors League New Titles flyer for the NewPages May 2024 eLitPak Newsleetter
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The Colorado Authors League (CAL) supports and promotes its community of published writers while connecting with and adding value to the reading world. Formed in 1931, authors become members to: keep up with changes in the craft of writing, publishing, and marketing, gain greater visibility for their writing, join a group of like-minded people who love writing. View our flyer to see new releases by members.

Want early access to our eLitPak flyers? Subscribe to our weekly newsletter! You can also support NewPages with a paid subscription and get early access to the majority submission opportunities, upcoming events, and more before they are posted to our site.

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2nd Annual Changing Light Prize for a Novel-in-Verse

Screenshot of Livingston Press' flyer for the second annual Changing Light Prize for a Novel-in-Verse
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Deadline: May 25, 2024
Livingston Press is accepting submissions of unpublished manuscripts for its annual Changing Light Prize for a Novel-in-Verse. There is no entry fee. Winner receives $500, publication, twenty copies, and a standard royalty contract. View our flyer and visit our website for guidelines.

Want early access to our eLitPak flyers? Subscribe to our weekly newsletter! You can also support NewPages with a paid subscription and get early access to the majority submission opportunities, upcoming events, and more before they are posted to our site.

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Tenth Annual North Street Book Prize for Self-Published & Hybrid-Published Books

Screenshot of the Winning Writers' flyer for the 10th Annual North Street Book Prize
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Winning Writers will award a grand prize of $10,000 in its tenth annual North Street competition, and $20,400 in all. The top nine winners will enjoy additional benefits from co-sponsors BookBaby, Carolyn Howard-Johnson, Book Award Pro, Self-Publishing Made Simple, and Laura Duffy Design. New this year: Everyone who enters online will receive a brief commentary from one of the judges. Submit books published in any year and on any self-publishing or hybrid-publishing platform. $79 entry fee. Enter online or by mail by July 1. Learn more at our website and share our flyer.

Want early access to our eLitPak flyers? Subscribe to our weekly newsletter! You can also support NewPages with a paid subscription and get early access to the majority submission opportunities, upcoming events, and more before they are posted to our site.

Interested in advertising in the eLitPak? Learn more here.

Editor’s Choice :: A Nice Safe Place by Andrew Madigan

A Nice Safe Place: A Cutler Series Book 1 by Andrew Madigan
Next Chapter, August 2024
Pre-Publication Order Link

One day, Amy Snyder disappears. Her father Wayne starts looking for her because the sheriff can’t be bothered. Who took her? There are a few sketchy people around: Jason, Amy’s boyfriend; Lupo, the middle-aged drug dealer who dates teenage girls; the creepy minister, Pastor Stone. Wayne searches all over the county but doesn’t find answers. As Wayne slowly discovers, Belvue isn’t the nice, safe place he thought it was.

Amy suddenly returns, but that’s just the beginning of her story. She’s quiet, thin, traumatized. She says a man kept her locked in a basement along with several other girls. Wayne takes her to the sheriff to make a statement, and she sees her captor’s face in a book of mug shots. Ray Loris, a cutler. Loris is arrested, but a few days later he’s released. There’s no material evidence at his home, no girls, not even a basement. And one more thing: Amy’s pregnant. She swears Loris isn’t the father, and neither is Jason, but she won’t say who is.

A Nice Safe Place follows Wayne as he searches for his daughter while other sections of the novel shift from the point of view of Amy to Loris to Pastor Stone. It is a story about a girl, her family, and a town that’s struggling through hard times. It’s also a story of family secrets and the terrible things people can do to one another, and a story of what it takes to heal.


To discover more great books from small, independent, and university presses, visit the NewPages Guide to Publishers as well as our Books Received monthly roundup. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to stay up to date!

Where to Submit Roundup: May 17, 2024

39 Submission Opportunities including calls for submissions, writing contests, and book prizes.

Well, May is half over with and we are starting to see more stable, warmer weather in the Midwest. And rain. I think the April showers carried over into May. It’s been a bit gloomy and chilly. Something to brighten your day? Enjoy more new books, upcoming events, and submission opportunities with the NewPages May 2024 eLitPak Newsletter. As always, we are here for you with our weekly roundup of submission opportunities.

Paid newsletter subscribers can get early access to the majority of submission opportunities and upcoming events before they go live on our site, so do consider subscribing or upgrading your subscription today. You also receive our monthly eLitPak Newsletter which features even more opportunities and other literary goodness.

Continue reading “Where to Submit Roundup: May 17, 2024”

Book Review :: Goyhood by Reuven Fenton

Review by Kevin Brown

Goyhood, Reuven Fenton’s debut novel, mixes a road trip with a twist on a coming-of-age story to develop Mayer (née Marty) Belkin’s existential crisis. Mayer grew up with his twin brother David in Georgia until one day when they were both twelve, and a rabbi came to town. When they discover they’re Jewish, Mayer goes to New York to study, marrying the daughter of a famous rabbi, while David explores a more hedonistic life. They reunite when their mother dies, leaving them with information that will change their lives, especially Mayer’s. David takes Mayer on a road trip during the week he’s away from his wife, exposing him to ideas and experiences that broaden his view of the world and himself.

Fenton slips into some writerly tics that can sometimes crop up in first novels: his narrator often comments that characters see something at their one o’clock (or some different time/location marker); he feels compelled to tell every city or town where they stop, even when nothing happens there, as if proving he knows the area; Mayer’s wife seems more like a plot point than an actual person; and he sometimes overwrites—“masticated” for “chewed” for one example.

However, the relationship between David and Mayer in Goyhood rings true, as does what Mayer needs to learn on his spiritual and emotional journey, as well as the physical one. One could do worse than spend time in a car with them and the people they meet along the way.


Goyhood by Reuven Fenton. Central Avenue Publishing, May 2024.

Reviewer bio: Kevin Brown has published three books of poetry: Liturgical Calendar: Poems (Wipf and Stock); A Lexicon of Lost Words (winner of the Violet Reed Haas Prize for Poetry, Snake Nation Press); and Exit Lines (Plain View Press). He also has a memoir, Another Way: Finding Faith, Then Finding It Again, and a book of scholarship, They Love to Tell the Stories: Five Contemporary Novelists Take on the Gospels. Twitter @kevinbrownwrite

Magazine Stand :: The Missouri Review – Spring 2024

The Missouri Review Spring 2024 issue is themed “Animal Kingdom” and features the 2023 Jeffrey E. Smith Editors’ Prize Winners, plus new fiction from Louise Marburg and Jessie Lee Brooks, new poetry by Fleda Brown and John Okrent, and new essays from Debra Dean, Maureen Stanton, and Kathryn Wilder. Also: an arts feature on anti-portraiture in contemporary art, a review of three biographies of three artistic power couples, and an interview with Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Carl Phillips.

Find out more about many of these titles with our Guide to Literary Magazines and our Big List of Literary Magazines and Big List of Alternative Magazines. If you are a publication looking to be listed in our monthly roundup or featured on our blog and social media, please contact us.

Magazine Stand :: South Dakota Review – 58.2

South Dakota Review is published quarterly at the University of South Dakota through the Department of English, and the newest issue (58.2) continues their commitment to cultural and aesthetic diversity with contributions from S.M. Badawi, Shlagha Borah , Rebecca Bornstein, Ronda Piszk Broatch, Jacob Butlett, Joseph J. Capista, Benjamin D. Carson, Richard Cecil, John Compton, William Erickson, Sarah A. Etlinger, Monica Joy Fara, Oladejo Abdullah Feranmi, Gary Fincke, Christopher Heffernan, Andrew Hemmert Justin Hunt, Genevieve Kaplan, Jen Karetnik, Charity Ketz, Anu Kumar Justin Lacour, Hillary Leftwich, Angie Macri, Kristine Langley Mahler, Matt Mason, Terri McCord, Mary B. Moore Marry Morris, Reuben Gelley Newman, John A. Nieves, Marlene Olin, Carolyn Oliver, Rachel Marie Patterson, Jessie Raymundo, Jennifer Richter, Dara-Lyn Shrager, and Anthony J. Viola. Cover art by Editor-in-Chief Lee Ann Roripaugh.

Find out more about many of these titles with our Guide to Literary Magazines and our Big List of Literary Magazines and Big List of Alternative Magazines. If you are a publication looking to be listed in our monthly roundup or featured on our blog and social media, please contact us.

New Lit on the Block :: Lodestar Lit

Twice a year online, Lodestar Lit publishes anything literary in style, including short stories, flash fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, and one-act plays available as a downloadable PDF. Their mission is nothing less than grand transformations – both in literature and within the individual creators, both present and into the future.

The editors explain, “The initial inspiration for our magazine’s name came from Carl Sagan’s 1980 documentary, Cosmos, in which he says that we are all ‘starstuff,’ or, in other words, stardust. Based on ideas of cosmology, we are living, breathing stardust endowed with consciousness, and we create reasons to live through art, science, philosophy, etc. Thus, we transcend ourselves through art like how a mathematician discovers a formula and transcends themself in their discovery. As authors, our writing is a guiding star – a lodestar – that leads us to new ways of living and being.”

Continue reading “New Lit on the Block :: Lodestar Lit”

Book Review :: Personal Score by Ellen van Neerven

Review by Eleanor J. Bader

Personal Score: Sport, Culture, Identity, a stunning collection of 47 essays and poems by award-winning Brisbane, Australia, based Aboriginal-Dutch writer Ellen van Neerven, straddles the line between personal reflection and political polemic. The nonbinary author’s reach is broad and the diverse pieces in the anthology touch on the importance of athletics in the social and physical development of girls; the sexual harassment and abuse that often derail the participation of female players; the massive fires, brutal storms, and dislocation that have been caused by ever-worsening climate change; and the persistence of racism against indigenous and other people of color.

The anthology also includes a searing indictment of anti-trans bigotry and zeroes in on the sidelining of Native knowledge about plants, animals, and land management by so-called scientific “experts.” In addition, colonialism is effectively denounced. Lastly, the book offers a moving analysis of illness and addresses the ways disability impacts their ability to write, participate in social justice movements, and socialize with family, friends, and colleagues.

By turns angry, mournful, moving, and persuasive, Personal Score reminds us of a foundational First Nation belief: “Only two relationships matter in the world, relationship with land and relationship with people.” van Neerven beautifully honors both.


Personal Score: Sport, Culture, Identity by Ellen van Neerven. Two Dollar Radio, April 2024.

Reviewer bio: Eleanor J. Bader is a Brooklyn, NY-based journalist who writes about books and domestic social issues for Truthout, Rain Taxi, The Progressive, Ms. Magazine, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and The Indypendent.

Magazine Stand :: The Common – Issue 27

Amherst’s Whiting Award-winning magazine, The Common joins the arrival of flowers and birds with its new issue (27). For the past eight years, the magazine, whose mission is to deepen our individual and collective sense of place, has published a portfolio of fiction translated from Arabic, transporting English-language readers to places from Morocco to Palestine. This year’s fiction comes from Chad, South Sudan, and Eritrea, and it explores non-linear time, the resilience and failure of love, and the corrosive effects of political instability. Also featured is a new story from Chlorine author Jade Song, an essay from ANGI co-editor Sven Birkerts, and three Hawaiian Pidgin poems excerpted from a forthcoming Kaya Press anthology.

Find out more about many of these titles with our Guide to Literary Magazines and our Big List of Literary Magazines and Big List of Alternative Magazines. If you are a publication looking to be listed in our monthly roundup or featured on our blog and social media, please contact us.

Lit Mag Covers :: Picks of the Week – May 13, 2024

Lit Mag Covers: Picks of the Week recognizes cover art and designs for literary magazines, whether in print or online. These are chosen solely at the discretion of the Editor. Enjoy!

This gorgeous cover on the Spring-Summer 2024 issue of Third Coast is a digital collage by Ashley Miller.

The cover of Conjunctions print issue 82, themed “Works & Days,” features the artwork of Jacob Lawrence, Watchmaker (1946) with cover design by Jerry Kelly, New York.

As a fan of Jaws, I couldn’t resist this Spring 2024 cover image on Fence, and this great story to go along with it: “Reports of series of shark attacks in July 1918 along the New Jersey Shore went viral in that era’s media, gripping the public’s attention. On July 12, the shark found its way into the freshwater Matawan Creek, attacking bathers and self-appointed rescuers at this exact location in Matawan, NJ, where, painted on a train bridge spanning the water, one can enter The Matawan Man-Eater Mural” (Tattoo Bob 2020).

Sponsored :: New Book :: Heart’s Code

cover of Heart's Code by Eugene Stevenson

Heart’s Code, Poetry by Eugene Stevenson

Kelsay Books, March 2024

“Eugene Stevenson’s Heart’s Code is a work of true wonder. Ever since my introduction to his poetry, I have awaited his first collection and it is nothing short of magnificent. With deft precision and a keen eye, Stevenson captures ‘the places of great joy [and] the places of great pain’ with a tender grace and moving beauty that will leave readers’ hearts aching for more.”—Michelle Champagne, Susurrus, A Literary Arts Magazine of the American South

“Filled with snapshots of compassion, the poems in Heart’s Code explore both the grand and pocket-sized experiences that drive us apart and bring us back together again, transformed into something greater than before.”—Maxwell Bauman, Door Is A Jar Literary Magazine Editor-In-Chief

“Expansive and stirring, Heart’s Code carries us through complex landscapes of generational love and loss. A study in impermanence, anchored to nature’s juxtaposed cycles of rebirth, Stevenson’s verse offers redemption through the very journey itself. A poetic atlas of life’s gutting transience, not to be missed.”—Kelly Easton, Editor, Compass Rose Literary Journal

“Eugene Stevenson’s debut collection of poetry ruminates on points of origin and journeys in sharply observed language. Simultaneously plain and artful, poem after poem draws us into dislocated people finding their way, following their own path, as a sensuous realism that conducts its own exploration, both familiar and unfamiliar, without constraining, as the ‘world / recede[s] in the distance.’ Heart’s Code is a meditation on a world balancing at the edge of its own disappearance.”   —Geoffrey Gatza, author of Disappointment Apples

Magazine Stand :: Good River Review – Issue 7

If Good River Review had an aesthetic, it’s that they don’t embrace one aesthetic. Rather the editors, both on the masthead and among their graduate students, only look for writing that excites, writing that avoids sameness. Within this issue, readers will find an essay by Davis McCombs, arguably best known for his award-winning collections of poetry; “Lizard Dreams,” flash fiction by Norie Suzuki; Danni Quintos’s poetry for young adults; and a review of Paisley Redkal’s West: A Translation, which collects poetry and essays in one book-length work. The subjects in Issue 7 are as various as the approaches. Readers will find writing that launches with the Electric Slide to that which describes a good deal of twerking.

The editors also include a reprint work that has been previously published or produced in the hope of giving that writing the extra attention it deserves. This issue features an excerpt from Terry Kennedy’s beautiful book-length elegy, What the Light Leaves Hidden, which dares to suggest grief can be seductive. An excerpt from “Animal Kingdom” is also included, a short story by Kristin Gentry from her debut collection Mama Said. Set in Louisville, the story presents Derby rituals familiar to the locals’ hometown but lesser known outside our city limits.

Magazine Stand :: The Lake – May 2024

The May 2024 issue of The Lake is now online featuring new poems from Melanie Branton, Kirsty Crawford, Sandy Feinstein, Paul McDonald, Bruce McRae, Gordon Meade, Sandra Noel, Miguel Rodríguez Otero, Beate Sigriddaughter, and Sharon Whitehill. Readers also review published poetry collections, including Jean Atkin’s High Nowhere, Anne Caldwell’s Neither Here Nor There, and Marsha de la O’s Creature. “One Poem Reviews” share a single poem from recent book publications, this month spotlighting Rhian Elizabeth Marian Kaplun Shapiro.

Find out more about many of these titles with our Guide to Literary Magazines and our Big List of Literary Magazines and Big List of Alternative Magazines. If you are a publication looking to be listed in our monthly roundup or featured on our blog and social media, please contact us.

Magazine Stand :: Arkana – Issue 16

Arkana Issue 16 cover image

Arkana: A Literary Journal of Mysteries and Marginalized Voices Issue 16 just launched and features an interview with poet Brody Parrish Craig, poetry by Angelina Leanos, Kai Coggin, Elizabeth Rose Bruce, Mary Simmons, Hollie Dugas, and Amanda Dettman, creative non fiction by Glenn Shaheen, Huina Zheng, and Ginevra Maria Marcosanti, fiction by Cathy Adams, Theo Wolf, and Sarah Liedtke Packer, and a script by Judy Klass. Run by the graduate students of the University of Central Arkansas, this online literary magazine publishes two issues a year, striving to bring together diverse voices that champion their mission. It’s free to submit, and all work is considered for $50 Editors’ Choice Awards in each genre.

Find out more about many of these titles with our Guide to Literary Magazines and our Big List of Literary Magazines and Big List of Alternative Magazines. If you are a publication looking to be listed in our monthly roundup or featured on our blog and social media, please contact us.

Book Review :: The Other Side of Nothing by Anastasia Zadeik

Review by Eleanor J. Bader

The Other Side of Nothing, Anastasia Zadeik’s second novel, is an emotionally resonant exploration of what it means to love someone with a life-threatening mental illness. The story centers around Julia, a suicidal soon-to-be-18-year-old who believes that she hastened her father’s death from cancer. After signing herself into a psychiatric hospital, she begins to stabilize. That is, until she meets 23-year-old Sam in group therapy. Sam, an up-and-coming artist, is everything Julia admires and they immediately become a couple. But things unravel almost as quickly as they began.

As Sam’s release date approaches, he convinces Julia to bolt the facility and join him on a cross-country road trip to Yosemite National Park. Once there, he intends to replicate Ansel Adams’ photo of Half Dome. From the start troubles lurk: Sam discards his medication, takes Julia’s cell phone, and becomes increasingly manic and controlling. Julia is terrified.

The hospital, meanwhile, has no clue about Julia’s whereabouts, and although staff have suspicions, they also know that they have to do something–and fast. Despite hesitation, they notify Sam and Julia’s mothers about the disappearance, prompting the pair to take a harrowing road trip of their own.

The Other Side of Nothing addresses heavy themes–bipolar disorder, depression, suicide–with sensitivity and grace, making the book both illuminating and unforgettable.


The Other Side of Nothing by Anastasia Zadeik. She Writes Press, May 2024.

Reviewer bio: Eleanor J. Bader is a Brooklyn, NY-based journalist who writes about books and domestic social issues for Truthout, Rain Taxi, The Progressive, Ms. Magazine, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and The Indypendent.

Where to Submit Roundup: May 10, 2024

39 Submission Opportunities including calls for submissions, writing contests, and book prizes.

Happy May! It’s a month for gardens to be planted and flowers to bloom. It’s also a great month to try to find a home for your work. We’re back again with our weekly roundup of submission opportunities for the first week of May 2024.

Paid newsletter subscribers can get early access to the majority of submission opportunities and upcoming events before they go live on our site, so do consider subscribing or upgrading your subscription today. You also receive our monthly eLitPak Newsletter which features even more opportunities and other literary goodness.

Continue reading “Where to Submit Roundup: May 10, 2024”

Magazine Stand :: Superpresent – Spring 2024

Superpresent is an art and literature magazine that puts equal emphasis on visual art and the written word. The theme for Spring 2024 is “survival.” Survival has been a central theme in literature — and life — since the beginning. Odysseus, Moses, Job, Ishmael, Jane Eyre all found ways to survive physical, spiritual, and emotional challenges of the first order. The ways in which survival is marked, however, may have changed. In addition to heroes and their journeys (see, for instance, in this issue of Superpresent, Sharon Kopriva’s paintings of iconic women and Crawdad Nelson’s “Walking Home in the Rain”), received divinations are presented (see Duncan Forbes’ “Cappella de Ossos,” Charter Weeks’ “Preacher Man,” and Mouse Mikala’s “Moaning on Christian Radio”) and encounters with beasts, lots of beasts (see Sharon Whitehill for spiders; Al Salwin for rats; Chelsie Kreitzmn for snakes; Diane Raptosh for roosters; Luis Angel Abad for chimps, piglets and tigers; Laura McCullough for koi; and Majid Bazei for dogs). Surviving relationships with oneself is explored in Cori Matusow’s “Tomboy,” while Elisa Manzini’s “Teeth” vividly describes surviving one’s abusers. Science strives to serve as a survival mechanism in Erica Miriam Fabri’s “Quantum Entanglement is the Scientific Explanation of Love.”

Magazine Stand :: Wordrunner eChapbooks – Issue 51

Wordrunner eChapbooks has released its 14th anthology and 51st issue. The theme is DISPLACEMENT. Who gets displaced? Sundered families, troubled or innocent youth, lonely elders, immigrants, prisoners, mental health workers (and their clients), anyone in the path of a hurricane, native populations. What gets displaced? Glaciers, planets, blackworms. Explore these possibilities with fiction by William Cass, Julian Ford, Jaryd Porter, Terry Sanville, Jay B. Shearer; nonfiction by Hugh Findlay, J.D. Mathes, Colleen Wells; and poetry by Kathleen Bryson, Chris Bullard, Hoyt Rogers. “In Strange Company,” nonfiction by J.D. Mathes was selected as Editor’s Choice for this issue with “Drift,” fiction by Jaryd Porter, receiving Honorable Mention from the 2023 fiction collection submissions.

Find out more about many of these titles with our Guide to Literary Magazines and our Big List of Literary Magazines and Big List of Alternative Magazines. If you are a publication looking to be listed in our monthly roundup or featured on our blog and social media, please contact us.

Book Review :: Knife by Salman Rushdie

Review by Kevin Brown

Most people know Salman Rushdie only for the publication of The Satanic Verses and the fatwa issued against his life, much to his regret. He and others thought he had moved on from that time in his life. However, on August 12, 2022, a man attacked him when he was on stage to speak at the Chautauqua Institution, leading Rushdie to lose sight in one eye and much of the mobility in one hand in addition to wounds in his neck and stomach. Medical specialists and his family thought he would die.

This memoir is the account of the attack, as Rushdie recounts that day, but it is much more about the power of love and art. Through his long recovery, Rushdie repeatedly returns to those two aspects of his life to help him through the roughest periods. As he has done his entire career, he celebrates freedom of speech that he believes all writers and individuals possess, but he also speaks much more openly of the love of his wife, Eliza, and his family, as well as the writers and broader literary community that rallied to his support.

In a time where extremism continues to be on the rise, this memoir celebrates that which we need most to combat it: the love of those around us and the art we all can create and celebrate.


Knife: Meditations After an Attempted Murder by Salman Rushdie. Random House, 2024.

Reviewer bio: Kevin Brown has published three books of poetry: Liturgical Calendar: Poems (Wipf and Stock); A Lexicon of Lost Words (winner of the Violet Reed Haas Prize for Poetry, Snake Nation Press); and Exit Lines (Plain View Press). He also has a memoir, Another Way: Finding Faith, Then Finding It Again, and a book of scholarship, They Love to Tell the Stories: Five Contemporary Novelists Take on the Gospels. Twitter @kevinbrownwrite

Book Review :: Poèmes deep/Gravitas by Amy Berkowitz

Review by Jami Macarty

“Poetry was a place to play / with language” for Amy Berkowitz: “There were no rules.” That is until she went to “grad school” and “learned” “that she had nothing to say” from professors in a creative writing program who “refused” to protect women students from the “serial abuser who’s been molesting / and harassing them for decades.” She had “been accepted to the program on the merit of a writing sample,” yet in response to what she was writing while a student there she was told her “poems lack gravitas.”

In a particularly adroit maneuver, Berkowitz claims the word used to undermine her artistic confidence. She titles each poem in a series of thirteen “Gravitas” followed by a numeral and a colon, e.g. “Gravitas Ten: The Size of the Problem.” In each poem, she describes an aspect of the gendered power struggles, violence, and abuse, and how sexism impacts expression within academia. Though the oppressive experiences at the academic institution Berkowitz attended are foregrounded, “the shit” she shares with readers “happens fucking everywhere” where there is “a guy like that” and “the lives of women…aren’t taken seriously.”

“It’s incredible how an institution
can make it impossible for students to have certain thoughts.
So much violence in that, so much power and control,
so sinister, so invisible.”

Continue reading “Book Review :: Poèmes deep/Gravitas by Amy Berkowitz”

Magazine Stand :: The Greensboro Review – Spring 2024

The 115th issue of The Greensboro Review (Spring 2024) is dedicated to Fred Chappell (1936 – 2024), UNC Greensboro Professor Emeritus and former North Carolina Poet Laureate, with a special tribute essay from novelist Angela Davis-Gardner. This spring edition features the annual Robert Watson Literary Prize selections, Mark Spero’s “Pig Therapist” for poetry and Daniel S.C. Sutter’s “Mantis” for fiction, as well as new work by Josh Bell, Elizabeth Fergason, Susan Finch, Jared Green, Benjamin S. Grossberg, Caitlyn Klum, Julia Kolchinsky Dasbach, Nik Moore, Ugochukwu Damian Okpara, Weijia Pan, Suphil Lee Park, Martha Paz-Soldan, Edmund Sandoval, Jacob Schepers, Max Seifert, Michael Waters, Leah Yacknin-Dawson, and C. Dale Young.

Magazine Stand :: The Main Street Rag – Spring 2024

The Main Street Rag Spring 2024 issue features an interview with Richard Allen Taylor by Jessica Hylton titled, “Letters to Karen Carpenter,” the same name given to a collection Taylor says “combines poems about the very public tragedy of Karen Carpenter’s life, death, and career with poems about my very private tragedy in losing my wife Julie to an acute form of Leukemia.”

The issue also features new “Stories & Such” by Jeff Burt, Nick Ekkizokloy, Dave Huffstetler, Pesach Rotem, Mark Williams; Poetry by Richard Allen Taylor, Virginia Aronson, Bob Caldwell, Lawrence Bridges, Cindy Buchanan, Chuck Carlise, Charles D. J. Case, Maureen Clark, Steve Cushman, Eugene Datta, M F Drummy, Leonore Hildebrandt, Joanne Esser, Arvilla Fee, Joseph Geskey, Lynnie Gobeille, Shelley Girdner, Lois Marie Harrod, Robert W. Hill, Linda Hughes, Mike James, Richard Kenefic, Luke Koesters, Ron Lauderbach, Thomas Long, Lisa Low, Ken Meisel, Marg Ryan, Abigail Michelini, Michael Minassian, Randy Minnich, David Newkirk, Camille Newsome, David Sapp, Claire Scott, George J. Searles, Phillip Sterling, Connie Soper, Diane Stone, Mark Strohschein, Mark Vogel, Buff Whitman-Bradley, and James Washington, Jr., as well as a deletion of book reviews. Cover photo by Tim Bascom.

Book Review :: School Communities of Strength by Peter W. Cookson, Jr.

Review by Eleanor J. Bader

School Communities of Strength: Strategies for Education Children Living in Deep Poverty, long-time teacher-researcher Peter W. Cookson’s latest book, is a forthright call to political leaders to end the continued scourge of American poverty. He defines this as having an annual income of $15,000 or less for a household of four, a condition that typically catapults whole families into homelessness and hunger.

Predictably, poverty and want cause children’s schooling to suffer, making the promise of an equal education little more than a pipedream. But poverty is not inevitable, and Cookson offers strategies not only for eradicating it but for meeting the needs of “the whole child.” This, he writes, starts with the belief that every student can learn and then zeroes in on the material resources that support their abilities, from free school meals to computer access, from safe, secure, and habitable school buildings to onsite medical and psychological care for kids and the adults they live with.

In addition, Cookson argues that ending poverty requires an understanding that penury is a policy choice. “Giving people crumbs that fall off the table of influence is not the same as empowering people with real education, real jobs, and real dignity,” he concludes.

School Communities of Strength is a potent directive for policymakers, educators, and those who care about children and families.


School Communities of Strength: Strategies for Education Children Living in Deep Poverty, Peter W. Cookson, Jr. Foreword by David C. Berliner. Harvard Education Press, April 2024.

Reviewer bio: Eleanor J. Bader is a Brooklyn, NY-based journalist who writes about books and domestic social issues for Truthout, Rain Taxi, The Progressive, Ms. Magazine, the Los Angeles Review of Books, and The Indypendent.

Magazine Stand :: Sky Island Journal – Spring 2024

Sky Island Journal’s stunning 28th issue (Spring 2024) features poetry, flash fiction, and creative nonfiction from contributors around the globe. Accomplished, well-established authors are published—side by side—with fresh, emerging voices. Readers are provided with a powerful, focused literary experience that transports them: one that challenges them intellectually and moves them emotionally. Always free to access, and always free from advertising, discover what over 150,000 readers in 150 countries, and over 900 contributors in 50 countries, already know; the finest new writing can be found where the desert meets the mountains.

Find out more about many of these titles with our Guide to Literary Magazines and our Big List of Literary Magazines and Big List of Alternative Magazines. If you are a publication looking to be listed in our monthly roundup or featured on our blog and social media, please contact us.

Lit Mag Covers :: Picks of the Week – May 6, 2024

Lit Mag Covers: Picks of the Week recognizes cover art and designs for literary magazines, whether in print or online. These are chosen solely at the discretion of the Editor. Enjoy!

“Fragments” by Christen Noel Kauffman is the cover art for the spring 2024 issue of Raleigh Review, an independent, non-profit publication based out of Raleigh, North Carolina, since 2010.

NELLE, the annual literary magazine from the University of Alabama at Birmingham Department of English, features Chiharu Roach’s “Code 22VD-Premonitions of Sorrow” on the 2024 cover.

The Spring 2024 Elm Leaves Journal scores a spot this week not just for its cool and timely cover – “The Eclipse Edition” – but also because IT’S BACK after a ‘brief’ hiatus, and, just like the sun, we’re happy to see them re-emerge!


Find out more about many of these titles with our Guide to Literary Magazines and our Big List of Literary Magazines and Big List of Alternative Magazines. If you are a publication looking to be listed in our monthly roundup or featured on our blog and social media, please contact us.

New Books April 2024

So long, April! Hello May! Each month we post the new and forthcoming titles NewPages has received from small, independent, university, and alternative presses as well as author-published titles. You can view the full list here.

If you are a follower of our blog or a subscriber to our weekly newsletter, you can see several of the titles we received featured. For publishers or authors looking to be featured on our blog and social media, please visit our FAQ page.

[Photo by Gaelle Marcel on Unsplash]

New Magazines April 2024

Time to stock up your summer reading pile by shopping the May 2024 New & Noted Literary & Alternative Magazine titles received here at NewPages.com!

Each month we offer readers a round-up of new issues with content information for our featured publications. The newest in poetry, fiction, nonfiction, comics, artwork, photography, media, contest winners, and so much more!

Find out more about many of these titles with our Guide to Literary Magazines and our Big List of Literary Magazines and Big List of Alternative Magazines. If you are a publication looking to be listed here or featured on our blog and social media, please contact us. You can also subscribe to our weekly newsletter to stay the most up-to-date on all things literary!

Magazine Stand :: The Awakenings Review – Spring 2024

The Awakenings Review is a biannual print publication from The Awakenings Project featuring works by poets, writers, and artists living with mental illnesses and/or addictions. The Spring 2024 issue features works by Linda M. Crate, Deborah Buehler, Bibhu Padhi, Sally Quon, Colleen Cavanaugh, Maria Connour, Katherine Szpekman, Jean Varda, Hope Andersen, Holly Dunlea, Bonnie Thurston, Elizabeth Brulé Farrell, Marie Marchand, Mary Magagna, Carol Ann Wilson, Raymond Abbott, Julia Van Buskirk, Zan Bockes, George Drew, W. Barrett Munn, Patty Somlo, Jane Marston, Mary Anna Scenga Kruch, William Leland, Christine Andersen, Francis DiClemente, Amirah Al Wassif, Dave Fekete, Tomra Vecere, Susan Spilecki, Michael Bennett, Kam Hemaidan, James Lineberger, and Mary Dingee Fillmore. Cover photograph: “Hope is the Thing with Feathers” by human rights researcher, writer, and photographer, Laura Story Johnson.

Find out more about many of these titles with our Guide to Literary Magazines and our Big List of Literary Magazines and Big List of Alternative Magazines. If you are a publication looking to be listed in our monthly roundup or featured on our blog and social media, please contact us.

Book Review :: The Race to be Myself by Caster Semenya

Guest Post by Kevin Brown

Anybody who pays attention to the news, especially sports news, probably thinks they know Semenya’s story, even if they don’t know her name. She’s a two-time Olympic medalist in the 800 meters from South Africa, but she was banned from running because her testosterone levels were too high, according to World Athletics, the governing board for track and field. They and some of her competitors argued that she had an unfair advantage.

This memoir is Semenya’s taking control of her own narrative, as she tells the story of how she fell in love with running, the acceptance she felt in her family and village, the success she had on the track, and her fight against World Athletics. Despite doctors’ classifying her as intersex, Semenya says she has never seen herself as anything other than female. She also argues that World Athletics never presented any scientific evidence that her testosterone levels gave her any advantage, and her racing times were well in line with other women she raced against.

For those who know Semenya’s story, The Race to be Myself by Caster Semenya will only deepen their knowledge, as she presents what she was thinking during her career. For those who think they know what happened during those years, her memoir presents a different view than the dominant narrative. For those who think they have no interest in a memoir about a runner, Semenya’s book reminds us that, when we talk about gender and access, we’re not talking about an issue; we’re talking about people.


The Race to be Myself by Caster Semenya. W.W. Norton, October 2023.

Reviewer bio: Kevin Brown has published three books of poetry: Liturgical Calendar: Poems (Wipf and Stock); A Lexicon of Lost Words (winner of the Violet Reed Haas Prize for Poetry, Snake Nation Press); and Exit Lines (Plain View Press). He also has a memoir, Another Way: Finding Faith, Then Finding It Again, and a book of scholarship, They Love to Tell the Stories: Five Contemporary Novelists Take on the Gospels. Twitter @kevinbrownwrite

Where to Submit Roundup: May 3, 2024

37 Submission Opportunities including calls for submissions, writing contests, and book prizes.

Happy May! It’s a month for gardens to be planted and flowers to bloom. It’s also a great month to try to find a home for your work. We’re back again with our weekly roundup of submission opportunities for the first week of May 2024.

Paid newsletter subscribers can get early access to the majority of submission opportunities and upcoming events before they go live on our site, so do consider subscribing or upgrading your subscription today. You also receive our monthly eLitPak Newsletter which features even more opportunities and other literary goodness.

Continue reading “Where to Submit Roundup: May 3, 2024”