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At the NewPages Blog readers and writers can catch up with their favorite literary and alternative magazines, independent and university presses, creative writing programs, and writing and literary events. Find new books, new issue announcements, contest winners, and so much more!

Magazine Stand :: Superpresent – Winter 2023

Superpresent literary magazine Winter 2023 issue cover image

The editors welcome readers to the Winter 2023 issue of Superpresent: “In the spirit of all who hunger, we welcome you to the seventh issue and third year of Superpresent magazine, assembled in this third year of a global pandemic and the first year of war in Ukraine. In this issue contributors explore food, drink, feeding, hunger, appetite, and many related and peripheral matters. We received over 400 submissions from 18 states, 17 countries, 80 poets, 53 writers, and 120 artists. In addition to self-styled artists and writers, contributors include a fireman, a doctor, a biologist, a librarian, an urban planner, a bartender, two journalists, a tarot reader, a designer, and a neuroscientist. The work selected ranges from the literal (a feast, actual family recipes, voluptuous images of fruit, vegetables, meat, eggs, and snack packs) to the metaphorical (food as fashion, food as sex, sex as food) to the tangential (critiques of the chemical industry, alternative uses for kitchen tools, precise measurements of the sodium, fat and carbs found in common foods) and includes memory pieces (jello and ball pits, rotting bananas) and humor (a gorilla fights a fly for a frozen treat?) and a little irony (the makings of Molotov cocktails delicately arranged as a still life – or should this be filed under metaphor?).” Decide for yourself by visiting Superpresent‘s website where the publication can be read online, downloaded as a PDF, or is available in print for purchase and subscription.

New Book :: The Encantadas

The Encantadas by Herman Melville book cover image

The Encantadas by Herman Melville
Wild Lot Press, April 2022

In this lavishly descriptive pioneering work of ecofiction, written just after the publication of Moby Dick, Herman Melville records the dawn of the anthropocene as it unfolds amid the teeming, treacherous islands of the Galápagos—or, as they were also known, the Enchanted Islands—the Encantadas. Now with an all-new introduction by Elizabeth Hennessy, author of On the Backs of Tortoises: Darwin, the Galápagos, and the Fate of an Evolutionary Eden, plus ten new full-color illustrations from artist Eric Tonzola, enclosed within a clothbound hardcover case, Wild Lot Press brings this long-overlooked novella to modern readers.

New Book :: Untangling the Knots

Untangling the Knots by Buffy Aakaash book cover image

Untangling the Knots by Buffy Aakaash
Kelsay Books, December 2022

Untangling the Knots by Buffy Aakaash opens doorways, solutions to approaching the everyday world with a renewed sense of awareness. Each poem is like a meditation on simple tasks we all experience. Metaphorical instructions on “How to Pet a Cat” or “How to Start a Fire” give way to deeper considerations like “How to Start Over” or “How to Stay Alive.” This collection of twenty tightly tailored poems will appeal to anyone who walks through life questioning the importance of the mundane, knowing there is always something deeper to those things people do that can seem feckless and unimportant. Aakaash grew up around hills and lakes in New Jersey west of New York City. He has lived as a queer man in both big cities and small remote towns throughout the US since then — backwoods Tennessee, Seattle, New York, San Francisco, high desert New Mexico, not in that order, but finally New England.

To discover more great books from small, independent, and university presses, visit the NewPages Guide to Publishers as well as the New Books category on our blog. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to stay up to date!

Magazine Stand :: The Society of Classical Poets :: January 2022

The Society of Classical Poets logo image

The Society of Classical Poets Journal publishes a print annual of poetry, translations, and essays selected from those published on the SCP website between February and January as well as artwork for inclusion in the print copy. Throughout the year, readers can find these works on a rolling basis, making each visit to the website a new reading discovery. Recent works include “Calendar Poems,” an essay by Margaret Coats, two different views on New Year’s Resolutions in poems by David Whippman and Evan Mantyk, two New Year’s Eve poems by Susan Jarvis Bryant, poems against birth control by Joshua C. Frank, “Where Ever-present Joy Knows Naught of Time” by Cynthia Erlandson, “Crimes Against My Sanity” and other poems on parenting by Anna J. Arredondo, “Addiction” by Paul Buchheit, “Freedom in Forgiveness,” a villanelle by Dan Tuton, “On Attending a Holiday Ensemble with My Wife” by Jeremiah Johnson, “The Fall of Babylon” by William Harrison, “Wisdom” by Russel Winick, “How Troubling to Know Mrs. Pain” by Norma Pain, and so many more great reads. Visit their website today!

To find more great reading, visit the NewPages Guide to Literary Magazines, the NewPages Big List of Literary Magazines, the NewPages Big List of Alternative Magazines, and the NewPages Guide to Publications for Young Writers. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to stay up to date!

New Book :: Homesick for Nowhere

Homesick for Nowhere essays by Richard LeBlond book cover image

Homesick for Nowhere by Richard LeBlond
EastOver Press, January 2023

Homesick for Nowhere is retired field biologist Richard LeBlond’s first collection of essays and was selected as a winner of the 2022 EastOver Prize for Nonfiction. LeBlond has faced down a bear in Newfoundland, chased an insufficiently amorous spadefoot toad through the soaking undergrowth, shilled for an auction house run by men he called Laurel and Hardy, choked down home-preserved seal-ribs in Labrador, encountered the Dark Tickle Streaker on his midnight run, and witnessed a rare performance by the leading rake and scrape band of Andros Island in the Bahamas. In short, LeBlond has had quite a life, and he’s written about it here with wit and compassion for the foibles and blessings of his fellow humans. He’s also thought quite a bit about what it means to grow older and how the writing life has helped him as he ages into his eighth decade. 

To discover more great books from small, independent, and university presses, visit the NewPages Guide to Publishers as well as the New Books category on our blog. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to stay up to date!

Magazine Stand :: The Writing Disorder – Winter 2022/23

The Writing Disorder online literary magazine Winter 2022/23 issue cover image

The Winter 2022/23 issue of The Writing Disorder online literary magazine is now available for reading and enjoyment. To close out 2022, there are 22 contributors in this issue offering all new works: fiction by Vicki Addesso, Don Donato, Jenny Falloon, Lyle Hopwood, Doug Jacquier, Ellie May Mandell, Ed Peaco, Andrew Plattner, Judy Stanigar; poetry by Phoebe Cragon, Richard Dinges, Jr., Kristen Hoggatt-Abader, Arezou Mokhtarian, Jim Murdoch, Christina E. Petrides, Brent Short; nonfiction by Margaret King, Yolanda Wysocki, and the art of Natalie Shou. The Writing Disorder is published quarterly online with the mission to “showcase new and emerging writers – particularly those in writing programs — as well as established ones.”

To find more great reading, visit the NewPages Guide to Literary Magazines, the NewPages Big List of Literary Magazines, the NewPages Big List of Alternative Magazines, and the NewPages Guide to Publications for Young Writers. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to stay up to date!

Where to Submit Roundup: January 13, 2023

Where to Submit Roundup 2023

It’s only the second week of 2023 and we’ve already hit our first Friday the 13th. Are you superstitious? If you are too afraid to go out, spend some time indoors writing and editing; we have plenty of submission opportunities to keep you busy through March. Oh, and don’t forget that we do have our Big List of Writing Contests to help you plan your submission calendar throughout the year.

Want early access to these opportunities, many before they go live on our website? Become a paid subscriber to our weekly newsletter. The cost is just $5 a month or you can subscribe for a year for only $50.

Continue reading “Where to Submit Roundup: January 13, 2023”

Review :: “To the Quick” by Karen McPherson

Southern Humanities Review volume 55 numbers 3 and 4 cover image

Post by Denise Hill

“To the Quick” by Karen McPherson is a brief poem made up of three tercets. It’s a poem of wizened recognitions that can truly only come with age, which the narrator acknowledges in her skin, “Hardening. // Softening. Veined and rugose.” where she wears her weariness for “hoarding my personal past while coveting others’ futures – ” (How does McPherson know my mind so well?) The speaker goes on to forgive and make plans, trim a kitten’s claws and compare those clever little mechanisms to her own nails, exposed and absurd as a result of tearing “away soft crescents with my teeth.” “To the Quick” delivers readers as promised, to that pit inside that yearns for understanding and connection while at the same time being fully grounded in the concrete non-attachment to time, which moves steadily forward. We eventually figure some things out, “forgive the lapses,” and remain mystified all the same. McPherson succinctly finds that sweet spot in “To the Quick.”


“To the Quick” by Karen McPherson. Southern Humanities Review, v. 55 nos. 3&4.

Reviewer bio: Denise Hill is the Editor of NewPages.com, which welcomes reviews of books as well as individual poems, stories, and essays. If you are interested in contributing a Guest Post to “What I’m Reading,” please click this link: NewPages.com Reviewer Guidelines.

New Book :: Tempered

Tempered fiction by Kate Kort book cover image

Tempered by Kate Kort
Brick Mantel Books, May 2023

In Tempered by Kate Kort, ten years after losing both his beloved mentor and his abusive father, Murray Henderson is still yearning for direction. He’s treading water in Cleveland, failing in his career and relationships. Anger, guilt, and distrust continually derail his chances at happiness. When an opportunity calls him to New York City, Murray finally sees a path out of his relentless grief. But as he navigates a hopeful new life, he soon falls back into old patterns of self-loathing and violence. A promising relationship starts to show cracks, and the friendships Murray has always counted on begin to fray. With his life shattering around him, Murray realizes he must confront his most devastating secret and the intertwined fear and anger that have haunted him for over a decade. Tempered, the sequel to Glass, explores the deadly pull of anger and how we are shaped by—and shape—the ones we love.

To discover more great books from small, independent, and university presses, visit the NewPages Guide to Publishers as well as the New Books category on our blog. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to stay up to date!

Magazine Stand :: Minerva Rising – Issue 22

Minerva Rising literary magazine issue 22 cover image

Issue 22 of the print literary magazine Minerva Rising: Then and Now is a celebration of all the writers who have been published by Minerva Rising over the last ten years. The writers and poets published in this issue wrestle with what it means to be women in the world with all the complexity of life – trauma, domestic violence, aging, societal norms, mindfulness, well-being, reconciling with our past, depression, and grief. These beautiful stories, essays, and poems testify to the wisdom and creativity in every woman. They remind us that as women, we are all connected, and at Minerva Rising, our voices are not only heard but amplified. Visit the publication’s website for ordering information.

To find more great reading, visit the NewPages Guide to Literary Magazines, the NewPages Big List of Literary Magazines, the NewPages Big List of Alternative Magazines, and the NewPages Guide to Publications for Young Writers. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to stay up to date!

Magazine Stand :: Under a Warm Green Linden – Issue 14

Under a Warm Green Linden online poetry magazine Issue 14 cover image

Issue 14 of Under a Warm Green Linden online poetry magazine is a double issue on Indigenous Ecopoetics, guest-edited by Beatrice Szymkowiak. Readers can explore thirty-eight poets whose new work expands the possibilities of ecopoetics—illustrating and reimagining relationships between culture, land, history, and nature: Kimberly Blaeser, Abigail Chabitnoy, Laura Da’, Diane Glancy, Joan Naviyuk Kane, Chip Livingston, dg nanouk okpik, Elise Paschen, Vivian Faith Prescott, Jake Skeets, James Thomas Stevens, Margo Tamez, among others. Under a Warm Green Linden offers recordings of many contributors reading their works, including featured poet Margaret Noodin, author of Bawaajimo: A Dialect of Dreams in Anishinaabe Language and Literature and two collections of poetry in Anishinaabemowin and English, Weweni and What the Chickadee Knows; Noodin has also translated over thirty books for children into Ojibwe. Visitors to the publication can enjoy hearing her singing her poem “Binawan / Dew Falls.”

To find more great reading, visit the NewPages Guide to Literary Magazines, the NewPages Big List of Literary Magazines, the NewPages Big List of Alternative Magazines, and the NewPages Guide to Publications for Young Writers. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to stay up to date!

Book Review :: Fixed Star by Suzanne Frischkorn

Fixed Star poems by Suzanne Frischkorn book cover image

Guest Post by Jennifer Martelli

Suzanne Frischkorn’s collection of poems, Fixed Star, braids loss and language. In her prose poem, “Nascent,” Frischkorn writes, “The yoked constellations—Capitalist and Communist—rang bright on her skin. Fidel, is it cold in Cuba?” As both the daughter whose “father’s from Cuba” and as the grandmother who will “twine a history with a silver thread,” the speaker cleaves to poetry. Frischkorn’s use of the sonnet crown throughout the book reminds us of her mastery of the craft. The sonnet becomes the braid, twining throughout the book. In “Letra,” Frischkorn writes,

            In Cuba, right now, someone conducts
     a symphony of furtive braiding for a tourist.
     She’ll leave before the last braid is half-done.

The repetition of the sonnet balances the “dissonance” in the first poem, “Cuban Polymita,” which opens with the haunting statement,

     Birth cleaved me in half—
     the sea I grew legs in
     now a dissonance
     a fixed star—

The section closes with the image of cleaving, in “XII,”

                 but all she said
     aloud was, “This is where I’m from.”
     Birth cleaved me in half—

In Fixed Star, Suzanne Frischkorn assures us that, despite displacement and despair, it is the language of poetry that will “coax the palomas to follow you home.”


Fixed Star by Suzanne Frischkorn. JackLeg Press, September 2022.

Reviewer bio: Jennifer Martelli is the author of The Queen of Queens and My Tarantella, named a “Must Read” by the Massachusetts Center for the Book. Her work has appeared in Poetry and elsewhere. Jennifer Martelli has received grants from the Massachusetts Cultural Council. She is co-poetry editor for Mom Egg Review.

New Book :: Flesh-plastique

Flesh-plastique poetry by Dennis Hinrichsen book cover image

Flesh-plastique by Dennis Hinrichsen
Green Linden Press, March 2023

Flesh-plastique, Dennis Hinrichsen’s tenth full-length collection of poetry, explores an array of debris fields, where we experience the repercussions of a life fueled by dirty, secular Eucharists. Moving at hyper speed through worlds—a compromising job in the nuclear industry, the purloined grave of the Apache chief Geronimo (not far from Atomic Annie, a cannon that could shoot a nuclear projectile)—Hinrichsen articulates each scene with a swift directness and capacious emotional range. In collages and atmospheric lyrics with stunning formal collisions, we hear anger and humor directed at the mess we have made of things, from the unsolved problems of nuclear waste and toxic forever-chemicals to the decay of the American family. But we also hear joy for the sheer pleasure of music and old technologies; we hear compassion for friends stricken with dementia; and ultimately, we hear notes of hopefulness for a world which swirls wildly and dangerously around us.

To find more great books from small, independent, and university presses, visit the NewPages Guide to Publishers as well as the New Books category on our blog. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to stay up to date!

Magazine Stand :: Cleaver – Issue 40

Cleaver online literary magazine Issue 40 cover image

In addition to celebrating their 10th Anniversary, Cleaver Issue 40 features selections from the first annual Cleaver Flash Competition. Judge Meg Pokrass comments, “It was only after rereading the stories for a number of weeks that my favorites became clear. Ultimately the winners were the ones that inexplicably moved me emotionally above everything else, and that I kept re-engaging with, trying to figure out how the writer worked their magic. It became a matter of recognizing that certain pieces had chosen me, not the other way around.”

Readers can enjoy works from First Place Winner Sabrina Hicks, Second Place Winner Janet Burroway, and Third Place Winner Dawn Miller, as well as Honorable Mentions by Paul Joseph Enea, Fannie H. Gray, Emily Hoover, Lisa Lanser Rose, James LaRowe, Andrea Marcusa, Christina Simon, Andrew Stancek, Laura Tanenbaum, and Kris Willcox, and Finalists by Joe Alan Artz, Madeleine Barowsky, Lyn Chamberlin, Nicholas Claro, Sarah Freligh, Theo Greenblatt, Amanda Hadlock, Meredith McCarroll, K. T. Moore, and Ron Tobey. Lex Lucius contributed paintings to this issue.

To find more great reading, visit the NewPages Guide to Literary Magazines, the NewPages Big List of Literary Magazines, the NewPages Big List of Alternative Magazines, and the NewPages Guide to Publications for Young Writers. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to stay up to date!

How an MFA Prepared Whitney Collins for Literary Life

Guest Post by Katy Yocom

headshot of Whitney Collins

Whitney Collins graduated from Spalding University’s low-residency MFA program in 2018, won her first Pushcart Prize in 2020, and published her first book to universal acclaim the following year. I asked Whitney, author of prize-winning short story collection Big Bad and the forthcoming Ricky & Other Love Stories, how the MFA program at Spalding prepared her for the literary life. According to Whitney, it all came down to volume, community, and craft.

In her own words:

Volume.

“The sheer volume of work we were asked to generate was remarkable, and, yes, a bit intimidating,” Whitney said. “But it’s doable, and you will AMAZE yourself by being able to do it. The Spalding ‘packets’ prove to you that not only can you write, but that you can also write A LOT. I graduated with a newfound confidence surrounding my generative abilities. I also graduated knowing I had no excuses! Priceless.”

Community.

“The community at Spalding is like no other,” she said. “It’s diverse, both culturally and in genre, and delightfully non-competitive. As Sena (Jeter Naslund, Spalding MFA co-founder) always said: ‘Your competition is in the library, not the classroom.’ Your classmates at Spalding will be your cheerleaders not your critics.” 

cover of Whitney Collins' story collection Big Bad

Craft.

“The short craft essays that you write at Spalding will not just teach you how to think critically about how and why a piece of creative work is working, but you will begin to read creative work differently,” she said. “You will start to dissect successful literature and figure out what is contributing to its success. And if you think critically and read critically, you will begin to write with more awareness. You’ll start hiking with a map instead of relying solely on instinct.”

And then there were the memories…

“My favorite Spalding memory? Just one? Probably just hanging in the Brown Hotel’s lobby bar. Eating, drinking, connecting, and laughing with other exhausted and excited writers.”

Whitney graduated from Spalding’s low-residency MFA program in 2018. Her short story collection Big Bad (Sarabande Books, 2021) won the Mary McCarthy Prize in Short Fiction. Her work has received a 2020 Pushcart Prize, a 2020 Pushcart Special Mention, and a Best American Short Stories 2022 Distinguished listing. Her second collection, Ricky & Other Love Stories, is forthcoming next year.

Spalding University Naslund-Mann Graduate School of Writing logo
Spalding’s Naslund-Mann Graduate School of Writing is now accepting applications for an early-decision deadline of February 1. Email [email protected] to request an application fee waiver code and save $30 when you apply.

Students can begin their studies with Spring residency (May 27 – June 3 in Louisville) or Summer residency (June 25 – July 3 in Québec City). Or apply by August 1 for the Fall semester (November-April).

Learn more at Spalding’s website, or email if you have any questions.


BIO: Katy Yocom is a Spalding alum, associate director of the Naslund-Mann Graduate School of Writing, and author of a prize-winning debut novel, Three Ways to Disappear.

New Book :: Exquisite by September

Exquisite by September poetry by Shayla Hawkins book cover image

Exquisite by September by Shayla Hawkins
EastOver Press, January 2023

In Exquisite by September, Shayla Hawkins chronicles the zeitgeist of the early 21st century United States and her place in it as an American Black woman, navigating and maintaining her sanity in a nation fraught with racism, pestilence, misogyny, and political upheaval. By turns humorous, melancholy, and sensual, this collection is a poetic museum through which Hawkins, as curator and guide, shares glimpses into different facets or “galleries” of her being. A poet from Detroit, Michigan, Hawkins is the author of Carambola. She is a winner of The Caribbean Writer Canute A. Brodhurst Prize for Short Fiction and The John Edgar Wideman Microstory Contest. Her collection of poems Exquisite by September was a 2020 runner up for the Cave Canem/Northwestern University Press Poetry Prize.

To discover more great books from small, independent, and university presses, visit the NewPages Guide to Publishers as well as the New Books category on our blog. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to stay up to date!

New Lit on the Block :: Yearling

Yearling print poetry literary magazine volume 1 cover image

Appropriately named given their location in Central Kentucky – “horse country” – Yearling also fits because it is (still) new and is published annually by Workhorse. What name could be more appropriate for this print poetry journal now joining the herd?

While Yearling may be new, the publications’ masthead come with a great deal of experience. “We are educators, writers, performers, enthusiasts for language, and the voice of every single person.”

Manny Grimaldi (he/him), Managing Editor, began as a regional actor in Shakespeare, with a degree in Dramatic Arts and Anthropology from Centre College. He is cunning with the spoken and written word and has published single pieces of poetry in Club Plum Literary Magazine, Kentucky State Poetry Society’s Pegasus Fall 2022, and the Lexington Poetry Month anthologies for 2020 and 2021.

Christopher McCurry (he/him), Editor, co-founded Workhorse in 2015, a publishing company and community for working writers. He believes “everyone should write poems and that

Continue reading “New Lit on the Block :: Yearling”

Magazine Stand :: Superstition Review – Issue 30

Superstition Review Issue 30 cover

Celebrating their 15th anniversary with Issue 30 of Superstition Review, readers can enjoy art by Corey S. Pressman, Jenny Wu, RAEchel Running, Shirin Mellat Gohar, and Valyntina Grenier; fiction by Amy Reardon, Gabriel Granillo, Michael Colbert, Mohamed Shalabi, Morris Collins, Patrick Henry Thomas, and JT Townley; nonfiction by Audacia Ray, Brooke White, Carlo Rey Lacsamana, Cassandra Whitaker, and Kaia Preus; poetry by Charlie Peck, Constance Hansen, Cynthia Marie Hoffman, Danny Rivera, Joanne Diaz, Kathryn Bratt-Pfotenhauer, Natalie Giarratano, Rachel Nelson, Rebecca Griswold, Remi Recchia, Susan L. Leary, and Yong-Yu Huang; interviews with Angie Cruz, Leopoldo Gout, Manuel Muñoz, Raquel Gutierrez, and Rudy Ruiz. Superstition Review is an open access online publication.

To find more great reading, visit the NewPages Guide to Literary Magazines, the NewPages Big List of Literary Magazines, the NewPages Big List of Alternative Magazines, and the NewPages Guide to Publications for Young Writers. Sign up for our weekly newsletter to stay up to date!

New Book :: Trace

Trace: Poems by Brenda Cárdenas book cover image

Trace: Poems by Brenda Cárdenas
Red Hen Press, April 2023

Through image-rich poems regarding migration, transcultural identity, loss, connection, dream, and aging—some translingual, some ekphrastic responses to ephemeral and surreal works of art—Brenda Cárdenas’ Trace explores conditions of displacement, liminality, and mutability. These poems transgress illusory borders between lands, languages, humans and the rest of the natural world, waking and dreaming, and the living and the dead as they unearth traces of experience that shape and haunt us, traces we leave behind for others to encounter. Although elegy resurfaces throughout this collection as does a poetics of social consciousness, Cárdenas also embraces moments of levity, story, and an effervescent internal music that balance her steps through fraught yet bewitching terrain.

To find more great books from small, independent, and university presses, visit the NewPages Guide to Publishers as well as the New Books category on our blog. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to stay up to date!

Magazine Stand :: South Dakota Review – 57.1

South Dakota Review print literary magazine issue 57.1 cover image

South Dakota Review Volume 57, Number 1, kicks off its new volume with poetry by Ana Maria Caballero, Ross White, Dana Salvador, Jennifer Met, James Cihlar, Eloise Klein Healy, Sean Cho A., Claudia Putnam, Pen Pearson, and Ahimsa Timoteo Bodhrán; fiction by LJ Kessels and Charles Holdefer; and nonfiction by Lane Chasek, Mardith Louisell, Gail Hosking, and Richard Holinger, as well as an experimental collaborative essay by Corinna Cook & Jeremy Pataky.

To find more great reading, visit the NewPages Guide to Literary Magazines, the NewPages Big List of Literary Magazines, the NewPages Big List of Alternative Magazines, and the NewPages Guide to Publications for Young Writers. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to stay up to date!

Books Received January 2023

NewPages receives many wonderful titles each month to share with our readers. You can read more about some of these titles by clicking on “New Books” under the NewPages Blog or Books tab on the menu. If you are a publisher or author looking to be listed here or featured on our blog and social media, please contact us!

Poetry

Apocrifa, Amber Flame, Red Hen Press
Becoming Couldn’t Sing for Anyone, Theresa Senato Edwards, Small Harbor Publishing
Chaos, Crossing, Olivia Elias, World Poetry
The Day Gives Us So Many Ways to Eat, Lindsay Wilson, WordTech Editions
Exquisite by September, Shayla Hawkins, EastOver Press
A Fire in the Hills, Afaa Weaver, Red Hen Press
Her Birth and Later Years, Irene Klepfisz, Wesleyan University Press
In the Cosmic Future, Jocelyn Heath, Kelsay Books
In the Current Where Drowning is Beautiful, Abigail Chabitnoy, Wesleyan University Press
Instead, It Is Dark, Cynthia Hogue, Red Hen Press
Irena Klepfisz: Her Birth and Early Years, Wesleyan University Press
Kisses at the Espresso Bar, Anita Nahal, Kelsay Books
Let’s Go For a Ride, William Livezey, Down East Books
A Light to Do Shellwork By, Georgiana Valoyce-Sanchez, Scarlet Tanager Books
Missing Addresses, Beth Bentley, Pleasure Boat Studios
My Dear Comrades, Sunu P. Chandy, Regal House Publishing
Night, Ennio Moltedo, World Poetry

Continue reading “Books Received January 2023”

New Book :: Missing Addresses

Missing Addresses poetry by Beth Bentley book cover image

Missing Addresses by Beth Bentley
Pleasure Boat Studios, March 2023

This long-awaited collection is the final manuscript assembled by poet Beth Bentley, who passed away in 2021 after a lifetime devoted to poetry. Her wide-ranging poems reflect on her deep love of art and philosophy, crystalline remembrances of family, and on the lives of cultural figures from history. They explore her Jewish heritage, her fierce feminism, and her perception of herself from an early age as an “outsider.” Missing Addresses evokes our losses, via age and happenstance, lending insight into the touchstones of our existence: our friends and families, our memories, our identities.

To discover more great books from small, independent, and university presses, visit the NewPages Guide to Publishers as well as the New Books category on our blog. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to stay up to date!

Magazine Stand :: Storm Cellar – Autumn 2022

Storm Cellar print literary magazine Autumn 2022 issue cover image

The Autumn 2022 issue of Storm Cellar: A Literary Journal of Safety and Danger, available in print or ebook, is nicknamed “Hobby Horse” and features fiction by David Busboom, Mandy-Suzanne Wong; flash by MAP, Carolyn Oliver, Ali Abid, DM O’Connor, JWGoll; creative nonfiction by Philip James Shaw, Theresa Lin; poetry by Tyra Douyon, Cecilia Díaz Gómez translated by Kiran Bhat, Natalie Louise Tombasco, Martha Zweig, Rigel Portales, Danielle McMahon, Stephen C. Middleton, Leigh Lucas, Ranney Campbell, Naomi Kanakia; images by Lesley Finn, Marija Mičić, Melody Serra, Sijia Ma, Jean Wolff, Mario Loprete, Erick Buendia, Dylan Willoughby, and cover by Maria Svartvadet Jakobsen. “We want everybody to get weird and enlightened and learn and fall in love and have superpowers,” the editors write. “We want to surprise and delight and horrify and provoke. Storm Cellar is not a distraction but a cure for boredom.” Your safety and danger await!

To find more great reading, visit the NewPages Guide to Literary Magazines, the NewPages Big List of Literary Magazines, the NewPages Big List of Alternative Magazines, and the NewPages Guide to Publications for Young Writers. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to stay up to date!

Where to Submit Roundup: January 6, 2023

Where to Submit Roundup 2023

We’re back fresh in 2023 with our Where to Submit Roundup! The first officially week of January is over and we have added several new submission opportunities for you to enjoy.

Want early access to these opportunities, many before they go live on our website? Become a paid subscriber to our weekly newsletter. The cost is just $5 a month or you can subscribe for a year for only $50.

Continue reading “Where to Submit Roundup: January 6, 2023”

New Book :: Before Lawrence v. Texas

Before Lawrence v. Texas: The Making of a Queer Social Movement by Wesley G. Phelps book cover image

Before Lawrence v. Texas: The Making of a Queer Social Movement by Wesley G. Phelps
University of Texas Press, February 2023

In 2003 the US Supreme Court overturned anti-sodomy laws across the country, ruling in Lawrence v. Texas that the Constitution protects private consensual sex between adults. To some, the decision seemed to come like lightning from above, altering the landscape of America’s sexual politics all at once. In actuality, many years of work and organizing led up to the legal case, and the landmark ruling might never have happened were it not for the passionate struggle of Texans who rejected their state’s discriminatory laws. Before Lawrence v. Texas tells the story of the long, troubled, and ultimately hopeful road to constitutional change. Wesley G. Phelps describes the achievements, setbacks, and unlikely alliances along the way. Over the course of decades, and at great risk to themselves, gay and lesbian Texans and their supporters launched political campaigns and legal challenges, laying the groundwork for Lawrence. Phelps shares the personal experiences of the people and couples who contributed to the legal strategy that ultimately overturned the state’s discriminatory law.

To find more great books from small, independent, and university presses, visit the NewPages Guide to Publishers as well as the New Books category on our blog. Click here to sign up for our weekly newsletter to stay up to date!

Magazine Stand :: The Missouri Review – Fall 2022

The Missouri Review print literary magazine Fall 2022 issue cover image

Editor Speer Morgan, in the Foreward to The Missouri Review Fall 2022 issue, comments on the “compelling new techniques in the arts” that, while innovative at their onset, “are often picked up and imitated until they seem to have always been used.” This issue’s theme, “Deep Focus,” comes from the technique used in early film, such as the 1922 Weimar production of Nosferatu, and Orson Welles’s Citizen Kane. He goes on to draw parallels with Walt Whitman’s “broad theme: We are large, we contain multitudes. We are partly right, partly wrong, but given the transience of life, we should fully visit this moment and this gathering of people with compassion, cheer, and attentiveness and then move on.” Great advice for the many seasonal family gatherings we encounter as well as other situations which bring us together, including reading the lives of authors and narrators in literary works. Included for readers in this issue is new fiction from Drew Calvert, Jonathan Johnson, Matthew Niell Null, Valerie Sayers, and Rohini Sunderam. New poetry from Andrew Hemmert, Rebecca Lindenberg, and Felicia Zamora. Essays by Robert Cochran, Jim Steck, and Mako Yoshikawa. Features on James Van Der Zee’s Harlem Renaissance photography, Florine Stettheimer and the Art of Modern New York, with an omnibus review from Lisa Katz on books by and about translators.

To find more great reading, visit the NewPages Guide to Literary Magazines, the NewPages Big List of Literary Magazines, the NewPages Big List of Alternative Magazines, and the NewPages Guide to Publications for Young Writers.

Magazine Stand :: New England Review – 43.4

New England Review print literary magazine Issue 43.4 cover image

Editor Carolyn Kuebler opens issue 43.4 of New England Review with a reflection on the shift in submissions to the publication throughout the pandemic, how “Covid-19 is no doubt the best documented pandemic of all time” and how quickly the situation changed around us so that in choosing works to publish, “it was more often the defining factor in pieces we did not publish. We didn’t need anyone to tell us how strange this all ways. Something stranger still was already taking place.” Kuebler writes, “So much of this writing felt a few steps behind, even in just a matter of weeks or months.” Recognizing how it has become woven into contemporary works, and also that pre-pandemic writing or writing that does not acknowledge it at all, reveals how “writers are able to fully inhabit, imaginatively, a world that preceded 2020, as well as they can inhabit this new one.”

This issue offers readers a Covid diary by Zoe Valery, Leath Tonino’s defense of the American Outback, a short play by British author Charlotte Turnbull, multi-page excerpts from poem sequences by Sandra Simonds and Diana Khoi Nguyen, new shorter poems by Kim Addonizio, Aumaine Rose Smith, and Josh Tvrdy, explorations into the archives by Michelle Peñaloza and Nicky Beer, first English translations of poems by Meret Oppenheim and Daniela Catrileo, new short stories by Yume Kitasei, Megan Staffel, and J. E. Suárez, and in “Rediscoveries,” Donald Mackenzie Wallace’s excerpt “Revolutionary Nihilism And Romantic Notions” taken from the 1912 edition of Russia, published in London by Cassell and Company. Some content is available for readers to access for free online.

To find more great reading, visit the NewPages Guide to Literary Magazines, the NewPages Big List of Literary Magazines, the NewPages Big List of Alternative Magazines, and the NewPages Guide to Publications for Young Writers. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to stay up to date!

Magazine Stand :: The Malahat Review – Issue 220

The Malahat Review print literary magazine Issue 220 cover image

The Malahat Review Issue 220 features the winner of their Far Horizons Award for Poetry, “Inner Child Work” by Meryem Yildiz, as well as poetry by Chelsea Coupal, Joel Harris, Ana Rodriguez Machado, Richard Sanger, Susan Glickman, Rachel Crummey, Ben Gallagher, Shauna Andrews, Sarah Yi-Mei Tsiang, A. Light Zachary, Manahil Bandukwala, Tasos Leivaditis, N. N. Trakakis, Annick MacAskill, Carl Watts, Camille Lendor, Jérémi Doucet, Erin Conway-Smith, Daniel W. K. Lee; fiction by Rachel Lachmansingh, Susan Sanford Blades, Zilla Jones, Shazia Hafiz Ramji; and creative nonfiction by Gabriel Cholette, Brian O’Neill, and Monica Wang. Readers can find an online interview with Shazia Hafiz Ramji about her story, “Selvon in Calgary.”

To find more great reading, visit the NewPages Guide to Literary Magazines, the NewPages Big List of Literary Magazines, the NewPages Big List of Alternative Magazines, and the NewPages Guide to Publications for Young Writers. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to stay up to date!

Book Review :: Foster by Claire Keegan

Foster by Claire Keegan book cover image

Guest Post by Kevin Brown

Like Keegan’s earlier book, Small Things Like These, Foster is slight in size, but not in emotional heft. This novella tells the story of a nameless girl in the Irish countryside whose parents must send her to stay with neighbors for a summer while her mother is pregnant. The main financial problem seems to be her father who loses cows in card games and has a liquid supper on a regular basis, while her mother has too many children to pay attention to all of them. The Kinsellas, who take the girl for the summer, don’t care much for her father, Dan, and it’s clear he thinks similarly of them. The situation is one of convenience more than care. Or so it seems. The Kinsellas love the girl in a way that neither of her parents do, a care they show in small ways that seem obvious: her new clothes and a bit of spending money for ice cream; a lack of shame when she wets the bed; lessons on how to read and cook. By the end of the novella, the Kinsellas have fostered the girl not only by keeping her for a few months, but by encouraging her, nourishing her, promoting her development, and, most importantly, cherishing her.


Foster by Claire Keegan. Grove Atlantic, November 2022.

Reviewer bio: Kevin Brown has published three books of poetry: Liturgical Calendar: Poems (Wipf and Stock); A Lexicon of Lost Words (winner of the Violet Reed Haas Prize for Poetry, Snake Nation Press); and Exit Lines (Plain View Press). He also has a memoir, Another Way: Finding Faith, Then Finding It Again, and a book of scholarship, They Love to Tell the Stories: Five Contemporary Novelists Take on the Gospels. Twitter @kevinbrownwrite or kevinbrownwrites.weebly.com/.

New Book :: A Fire in the Hills

A Fire in the Hills by Afaa Weaver book cover image

A Fire in the Hills by Afaa Weaver
Red Hen Press, April 2023

In A Fire in the Hills, Afaa Weaver focuses on one of the central threads in his body of work. His ongoing project of an articulation of self in relation to the external landscape of the community and the world and the writing of spirit through those revelations of sublimation of self gives way here to a material focus. The racial references are explicit as are the complexities of life lived as a Black man born in America in the mid-twentieth century. These are poems emanating from an attempt to follow Daoist philosophy for most of his life. Knowledge of other is in relation to knowledge of self, and self is an illusory continuum, a perspective wherein the poet embodies the transcendent arc of Malcolm X’s life as credo.

To find more great books from small, independent, and university presses, visit the NewPages Guide to Publishers as well as the New Books category on our blog. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to stay up to date!

New Book :: The Naked Room

The Naked Room poetry by Willa Schneberg book cover image

The Naked Room by Willa Schneberg
Broadstone Books, January 2023

Poetry is a form of writing ideally suited to the expression of emotion and the most profound and subtle workings of the mind. But what if that mind is shattered, and those emotions in disarray? Such is the subject explored in Willa Schneberg’s new poetry collection The Naked Room, which draws on her experiences as a therapist to take readers on a journey through the disturbing history of psychotherapy and the treatment of mental illness, and into the current state of the art and state of the world. What keeps this from being a grim undertaking is the sheer beauty and precision of her language, as in this passage from “Tiny Monuments” describing the urns that hold the cremated remains of patients at the Oregon State Hospital (depicted on the cover of the book in a photograph by the poet): “These tiny monuments to the scorned and unknown, / wear patinas of pink, burnt sienna, ocher, aqua, / and if you look closely you will find / moon craters, archipelagos, frozen waterfalls, / Big Dippers and dunes with lone tracks.” The goal of healing that drives her therapeutic practice informs these poems as well, ending in the necessity of love, her closing image that of a long-time couple spooning in bed, “as if we would always / fit that way.” These poems, too, fit that way, a comforting reassurance.

To find more great books from small, independent, and university presses, visit the NewPages Guide to Publishers as well as the New Books category on our blog. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to stay up to date!

New Lit on the Block :: NĪNSHAR Arts

Ninshar Arts online literary magazine 2022 cover image

If you seek “musings, hallucinations, fantasies, determinations and peregrinations that depart formal structures and do not recognize parameters,” then you need look no further than NĪNSHAR Arts, an open access online publication of poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, paintings, drawings, etchings, photography, digital art, and sculpture images publishing on a rolling basis.

Continue reading “New Lit on the Block :: NĪNSHAR Arts”

New Book :: TimeLock

TimeLock novel by Howard Berk and Peter Berk book cover image

TimeLock by Howard Berk and Peter Berk
IngramElliott Publishing, September 2022

Reading TimeLock by Howard Berk and Peter Burk is a great way to celebrate National Science Fiction Day (January 2). In the crime-ridden near future where a bold new technology transforms the justice system and challenges America’s moral compass, the President authorizes a hugely controversial program: TimeLock, a cellular acceleration process whereby select prisoners are instantly aged the total number of years of their sentence. In other words – three strikes and you’re old . . . very old. Only one problem—what happens if someone is innocent? When everyman Morgan Eberly is arrested for a murder he didn’t commit, he’s subjected to this experimental new technology. Now 43 and on the run, Morgan teams up with Janine Price, the FBI agent who arrested him, as they embark on a dangerous quest to find out the terrifying truth behind the TimeLock program.

Special thanks to Peter Berk for this title which he co-wrote with his late father, Howard. “My dad – Howard Berk – wrote numerous shows, films and novels, with credits including Columbo, The Rockford Files and Mission: Impossible. A few years before his passing, we wrote a screenplay which I later novelized along with several sequels also based on related scripts. TimeLock is the first of five planned novels in the series.”

Magazine Stand :: The Massachusetts Review – Winter 2022

The Massachusetts Review literary magazine Winter 2022 issue cover image

“Disability Justice” is the newest issue of The Massachusetts Review. Guest edited and introduced by Cyrée Jarelle Johnson and Khairani Barokka, the volume presents “writing by disabled authors that pushes back against dominant depictions of disabled people as helpless, minor, or merely as patients and nothing more. . . The work in this issue reclaims the narrative of illness and disability from medical experts and scientists. It centers the wisdom and expertise of those living painful lives, sick lives, disabled lives, neurodivergent lives. It insists that such lives are worth living, are beautiful, are deserving of documentation. It brings our universes into being and our bodies into focus.”

Contributors include Zuo You, Zefyr Lisowski, Claude Olson, Brian Teare, Vivian Li, Lynn Buckle, Djenebou Bathily, Levent Beskardes, Bhavna Mehta, Ally Zlatar, Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha, Saleem Hue Penny, Rosebud Ben-Oni, Michelle Renee Hoppe, Ife Olatona, Panteha Abareshi, Andy Jackson and Gaele Sobott, Adrienne Marie Barrios and Leigh Chadwick, Christine Barkley, Abu āl-`Alā´ al-Ma`arrī, Camisha Jones, Jodie Noel Vinson, Maureen Seaton, Ellen Samuels, Kay Ulanday Barrett, Olivia Muenz, Clare Richards, John Newton Webb, , Travis Chi Wing Lau, Daniel Sluman, Pinka PopsicKle, Ekiwah Adler-Belendez, Kieran Mundy, Joselia Rebekah Hughes, Wakaya Wells, Yi Zhe, Stephanie Papa, and Salma Harland. Some content is available to read free online.

To find more great reading, visit the NewPages Guide to Literary Magazines, the NewPages Big List of Literary Magazines, the NewPages Big List of Alternative Magazines, and the NewPages Guide to Publications for Young Writers. Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to stay up to date!

New Book :: Stories No One Hopes Are About Them

Stories No One Hopes Are about Them
Short Fiction by A. J. Bermudez published by University of Iowa Press book cover image

Stories No One Hopes Are About Them
Short Fiction by A. J. Bermudez
University of Iowa Press, November 2022

At once playfully dark and slyly hopeful, Stories No One Hopes Are About Them explores convergences of power, privilege, and place. Characters who are ni de aquí, ni de allá—neither from here nor there—straddle competing worlds, disrupt paradigms, and transition from objects of other people’s stories to active subjects and protagonists of their own. Narratives of humanity and environment entwine with nuanced themes of colonization, queerness, and evolution at the forefront. Big things happen in this collection. But it’s also a collection of small intimacies: misremembered names, chipped teeth, and private rituals; unexpected alliances and barely touched knees beneath uniform skirts; minutiae of the natural world; incidents that quietly, achingly, and delightfully transgress the familiar. Winner of the Iowa Short Fiction Award.

Book Review :: The Swimmers by Julie Otsuka

The Swimmers by Julie Otsuka book cover image

Guest Post by Kevin Brown

Julie Otsuka uses shifting points of view to make her books both universal and specific. In her novel, The Swimmers, she begins with the first person plural point of view to give voice to the titular swimmers, exploring the diversity of their reactions when the pool develops a crack, a metaphor for the loss to come in the second half of the novel. Otsuka sets up the idea of memory, collective and individual, she will explore through Alice, one of the swimmers. The reader learns little about Alice in the second half, though Otsuka shifts to the second person point of view to put the reader in the position of Alice’s daughter (who sounds quite similar to Otsuka, from the few hints the reader receives, including her mother’s interment in camps during World War II, one of the memories her mother holds onto throughout much of her deterioration). The reader sees Alice from a distance as one of the swimmers and up close as a mother who is becoming a different person than the daughter remembers. The reader empathizes with the mother and daughter, but knows, as the doctors make clear, there is nothing to do, but to endure the inevitable loss and rebuild a life after that loss.


The Swimmers by Julie Otsuka. Knopf, February 2022.

Reviewer bio: Kevin Brown has published three books of poetry: Liturgical Calendar: Poems (Wipf and Stock); A Lexicon of Lost Words (winner of the Violet Reed Haas Prize for Poetry, Snake Nation Press); and Exit Lines (Plain View Press). He also has a memoir, Another Way: Finding Faith, Then Finding It Again, and a book of scholarship, They Love to Tell the Stories: Five Contemporary Novelists Take on the Gospels. Twitter @kevinbrownwrite or kevinbrownwrites.weebly.com/.

New Book :: Semantics of the World

Semantics of the World: Selected Poems by Rómulo Bustos Aguirre book cover image

Semantics of the World: Selected Poems by Rómulo Bustos Aguirre
Edited and translated by Nohora Arrieta Fernández and Mark A. Sanders
University of New Mexico Press, December 2022

A poet of both the body and spirit, the work of Rómulo Bustos Aguirre often explores the nature of existence at the turn of the twenty-first century–humankind’s relationship to itself and the universe, the meaning or purpose, if any, of human existence, and the daunting task of discerning that meaning. Critics have described his poetry as highly refined lyricism, metaphysical, existential, and at times erotic. Semantics of the World introduces the English-speaking world to the exciting work of Rómulo Bustos Aguirre, one of Colombia’s most celebrated living writers.

To find more great books from small, independent, and university presses, visit the NewPages Guide to Publishers as well as the New Books category on our blog. Click here to sign up for our weekly newsletter to stay up to date!

Magazine Stand :: Rain Taxi – Winter 2022

Rain Taxi Review of Books Winter 2022 cover image

The Winter 2022 Rain Taxi Review of Books is available at bookstands or by membership subscription and includes interviews with poet Dara Barrois/Dixon and multi-genre writer Carl Watson, features on novelist Pauline Melville and poet Susan Lewis, and reviews that will take readers from the classic literature of Stendhal to the contemporary cartooning of Kate Beaton and cover art by Roger Williamson. Check out the complete table of contents of issue 108 here.

Magazine Stand :: Portrait of New England – Volume 2

Portrait of New England literary magazine volume 2 cover image

The Portrait of New England Volume 2 is the first issue back from the publication’s hiatus, which NewPages.com covered in this interview with its new editor, Matthew Johnson, and founding editors Brett Murphy Hunt and Jon Bishop. Portrait of New England is a regional-based online literary magazine that published poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction from writers with ties to New England – which can include being a current or former resident or attending schooling in the region. NewPages.com is happy to welcome the publication back with contributions from Andrew Yim, Donna Mitchell, Eric D. Lehman, Emily Fabbricotti, Emily Ehrhart, Benjamin Thomas, Ann Taylor, Alexander B. Joy, Ed Ahern, Charlotte Friedman, Cortney Davis, Kathryn Sadakierski, Joanne Corey, Melissa D. Burrage, John Grey, Patricia Peterson, Katherine Gotthardt, Katherine Gotthardt, Gayle Lauradunn, Frank William Finney, Angela Acosta, and Natalie Schriefer. Submissions for the next issue are open from March 1-May 31, 2023.

Book Review :: Demon Copperhead by Barbara Kingsolver

Demon Copperhead by Barbara Kingsolver book cover image

Guest Post by Kevin Brown

In her latest novel, Demon Copperhead, Barbara Kingsolver updates Charles Dickens’ David Copperfield (thus the name of the titular character), moving the story to turn-of-the-millenium Appalachia. This approach tempts those readers who are familiar with Dickens’s novel to play a matching game with characters and events, but Kingsolver’s novel goes much further than a literary exercise that tests readers’ nineteenth-century novel knowledge. Her interest in updating Dickens’ novel is to explore the poverty rampant in Appalachia (as it was in Dickens’s London), a problem made significantly worse because of the opiod crisis. While Dickens’s David struggles through his own forms of exploitation, Kingsolver’s Demon, his friends, and his family are all victims in various ways to the addiction that pharmaceutical companies created in places and people who lacked the means to fight back. As with cases from real life, Demon comes by his addictions innocently, but then struggles with them for hundreds of pages, despite those around him who are trying to help. While Kingsolver shows a community decimated by drugs, she creates characters—as does Dickens—the reader cares about. She puts a face to the headlines many of us have the luxury of skimming over and reminds readers there are too many people whose lives seem destined for destruction, through no fault of their own.


Demon Copperhead by Barabara Kingsolver. Harper Collins Publishers, October 2022.

Reviewer bio: Kevin Brown has published three books of poetry: Liturgical Calendar: Poems (Wipf and Stock); A Lexicon of Lost Words (winner of the Violet Reed Haas Prize for Poetry, Snake Nation Press); and Exit Lines (Plain View Press). He also has a memoir, Another Way: Finding Faith, Then Finding It Again, and a book of scholarship, They Love to Tell the Stories: Five Contemporary Novelists Take on the Gospels. Twitter @kevinbrownwrite or kevinbrownwrites.weebly.com/.

Magazine Stand :: The Shore – Issue 16

The Shore online poetry magazine issue 16 cover image

The Shore issue 16 marks the online quarterly publication’s fourth full year of production, and the newest issues keeps to their standard of selecting poems from new and established poets that are “cutting, strange, and daring.” Featured in this issue are works by Ellery Beck, Nasser Alsinan, Ryan Varadi, Michael Goodfellow, John Glowney, Heather Qin, Helen Nancy Meneilly, Mary Simmons, Justin Carter, Michel Agunbiade, Maggie Boyd Hare, Maya C Thompson, Ronda Piszk Broatch, Chris McCann, Margaret M Kelly, Daniel Dias Callahan, Katie Tian, Martha Silano, Marina Brown, Mike WIlson, Anthony Gabriel, Christopher Citro & Dustin Nightingale, Shannon Hardwick, Kevin Roy, Jay Brecker, Lauren Badillo Milici, Grant Schutzman, Monica Cure, Brandon Hansen, Erin Wilson, Lucas Dean Clark, M Cynthia Cheung, Leland Seese, Joey Wańczyk, Kimberly Ann Priest, Joe Dahut, and Vanessa Couto Johnson with haunting art by taylor d waring.

New Book :: The Wandering Radiance

The Wandering Radiance: Selected Poems of Hilde Domin Translated by Mark S. Burrows book cover image

The Wandering Radiance: Selected Poems of Hilde Domin
Translated by Mark S. Burrows
Green Linden Press, April 2023

Hilde Domin is one of the most highly regarded German poets of the 20th century. A poet of the Jewish faith, she fled political developments in Germany in 1932 and spent more than twenty years in exile, first in Italy then the Dominican Republic, which became her self-chosen namesake. Her work was deeply influenced by her time in exile and the loss of homeland. After returning to Germany, she was known as the “poet of return” and received numerous honors for her literary work, including the Carl Zuckmayer Medal, the Nelly Sachs Prize, and the Grand Federal Cross of Merit. Presented bilingually, many of these poems appear here for the first time in English. Read a sample from Under a Warm Green Linden, Issue 13.

Where to Submit Round-up: December 30, 2022

hand holding a pen and writing in a notebook

It’s the final Where to Submit Round-up for December 2022! We’ll see you all in the New Year. How will your submission goals change in 2023?

Want to get alerts for new opportunities sent directly to your inbox every Monday afternoon instead of waiting for our Friday Where to Submit Round-ups? For just $5 a month, you can get early access to new calls for submissions and writing contests before they go live on our site, so subscribe today! Free subscribers get access to the latest submission opportunities on the following Monday.

Continue reading “Where to Submit Round-up: December 30, 2022”

New Book :: What You Wish For

What You Wish For poetry by Ruth Bardon book cover image

What You Wish For by Ruth Bardon
Finishing Line Press, March 2023

In What You Wish For, Ruth Bardon uses a feminist lens to take a fresh look at wishes, witches, magic spells, princesses, sleeping beauties, and 21st century queen bees. Her poems are sympathetic both to hopeful, yearning heroines and to equally hopeful, yearning villains and minor characters. At the same time, they are darkly pessimistic about the possibility of happy endings. With subtlety and humor, these quiet poems radically deconstruct familiar stories. Ruth Bardon grew up in Highland Park, New Jersey, and lived in a number of midwestern cities before firmly settling in Durham, North Carolina. She received an MFA degree from the Iowa Writers Workshop in 1982 and a PhD in English from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1995. Her poems have appeared in journals, and her first chapbook, Demon Barber, was published by Main Street Rag in 2020.

Magazine Stand :: World Literature Today – Jan/Feb 2023

World Literature Today Jan/Feb 2023 issue cover image

Headlining the Jan/Feb 2023 issue of World Literature Today is Senegalese writer Boubacar Boris Diop, laureate of the 2022 Neustadt International Prize for Literature. Also inside, Emily Doyle interviews R.O. Kwon (“On Sex, Soul Loneliness, and Walking toward Terror”), while Shoshana Bellen, Cleyvis Natera, Ana Ojeda, and Danae Sioziou provide additional conversational exchanges. Further highlights include A.E. Copenhaver’s “Eco-Lit to Read Now” booklist, a new poem by Ted Kooser, and an excerpt i9from Deena Mohamed’s forthcoming graphic novel Shubeik Lubeik (Pantheon, 2023). With more than two dozen book reviews, recommended reading lists, and other great content in the latest issue, be sure to take WLT—your passport to great reading—with you into 2023 and beyond.

Book Review :: Everyone Knows Your Mother is a Witch by Rivka Galchen

Everyone Knows Your Mother is a Witch by Rivka Galchen book cover image

Guest Post by Kevin Brown

In Everyone Knows Your Mother is a Witch, Rivka Galchen uses the story of Johannes Kepler’s mother, whom her neighbors accused of being a witch, to explore how easily people will bow to societal pressures. Katharina is a woman like many in the early 1600s: unable to read or write, but knowledgeable of the natural world. She is also a widow in possession of property. That combination makes her an ideal target for her accusers. Galchen also creates a seemingly innocent bystander—Katharina’s neighbor Simon, who serves as her guardian in the absence of her children—to take down her testimony. The reader watches the world through Simon’s eyes, as well as Katharina’s account of her experiences, and the reader also watches Simon react to the pressures the townspeople put on him. Through Simon, Galchen raises the question of who is willing to stand beside the accused even to their own detriment, as well as exploring what it feels like to be the accused. In her recreation of a time that seems so different from our own, Galchen reminds readers we will all have such moments—both of bearing witness and of standing up for ourselves—turning a time-bound tale into one that is terribly relevant.


Everyone Knows Your Mother is a Witch by Rivka Galchen. Macmillan, June 2021.

Reviewer bio: Kevin Brown has published three books of poetry: Liturgical Calendar: Poems (Wipf and Stock); A Lexicon of Lost Words (winner of the Violet Reed Haas Prize for Poetry, Snake Nation Press); and Exit Lines (Plain View Press). He also has a memoir, Another Way: Finding Faith, Then Finding It Again, and a book of scholarship, They Love to Tell the Stories: Five Contemporary Novelists Take on the Gospels. Twitter @kevinbrownwrite or kevinbrownwrites.weebly.com/.

New Book :: Black Fire This Time, Volume 1

Black Fire This Time Volume 1 Anthology edited by Kim McMillon and Kofi Antwi book cover image

Black Fire This Time, Volume 1, edited by Kim McMillon and Kofi Antwi
Aquarius Press/Willow Books, September 2022

Black Fire This Time, Volume 1 is an anthology celebrating the roots and legacy of the Black Arts Movement begins with a foreword by Ishmael Reed and introduction by Margot Crawford and features the works of over 100 poets and writers, including (in no particular order) Nikki Giovanni, James Baldwin, Amiri Baraka, Amina Baraka, Eugene B. Redmond, Lucille Clifton, Haki R. Madhubuti, Wanda Coleman, E. Ethelbert Miller, Jerry Ward, Tom Dent, Michael Simanga, Quincy Troupe, Margaret Porter Troupe, Dudley Randall, Askia Toure, QR Hand, Jr., Denise Nicholas, Sonia Sanchez and many more. Michigan writer Denise Nicholas’s chapter is based on her true story as a voting rights volunteer from Michigan in 1964, inspired Michigan’s Office of the Governor to issue a Proclamation for an annual Freedom Summer Remembrance Day. Aquarius Press owner Heather Buchanan is a graduate of Wayne State University and UM-Dearborn, respectively. She was a director of the Idlewild Writers Conference and Midwest Poets & Writers Conference. Her press publishes many of the nation’s top poets and writers of color and national laureates, Including Dr. Mona Lisa Saloy (Louisiana), devorah major and Tongo Eisen-Martin (San Francisco) and Lupe Mendez (Texas). If not for yourself, consider purchasing a copy for your local public or school library.

Magazine Stand :: Waxing & Waning – Issue 10

Waxing & Waning literary magazine Issue 10 cover image

For Issue 10 of Waxing & Waning, the editors went with their standard call: “We want what’s on the fringe. Whatever is deep and true. The moon represents this idea: what is dark, what is brooding, what is wild, what is crescent and changing. We want to feed the beast in you, the one buried beneath layers of manners and anxiety and internet induced abyss, repetition, and relative sameness. Work submitted to Waxing & Waning should be honest and well-executed. It should scream coherently; it should bring experiences and knowledge out of us that we have not seen before. It should rip out our black hearts and put them in front of our eyes. Bring us the work everyone else is afraid of. Bring us the work you’re afraid of. Bring us the work that gets at the trueness frightening you out of the routine. In a world blanketed in monotony—we seek to search outside of ourselves so we can better love, give love, and sacrifice for whatever art could bring. We hope to wax in truth and wane into poetics—to shelter ourselves from reality. To bathe in the light of the moon.”

Stepping up to meet this call for Issue 10 are contributions of poetry by A.N. DeJesus, Esme DeVault, Benjamin Green, Marian Shapiro, Taunja Thomson, and Andrew Walker; fiction by Robert Cramblitt, Max Firehammer, Joseph Morice, Chris Motto, Elizabeth Quirk, Eugene Radice, Douglas Steward, and Rebecca Wood; creative non-fiction by Mackenzie Broderick, Christie Green, Joan Halperin, Melanie Reitzel, and Anne-Christine Strugnell; art by Katie Allcorn, Karyna Aslanova, Gianna Sozzi, and Alice Teeple; a play by Paul Antokolsky; and Editor’s Note by Lance Ümmenhofer.

Waxing & Waning is published under the April Gloaming Publishing imprint, which includes a special focus on Southern literature as well as novels, memoirs, poetry collections, and anthologies. Print copies of Waxing & Waning and the Waxing & Waning Presents Series can be purchased here: www.aprilgloaming.com/shop

New & Noted Lit & Alt Mags – December 2022

NewPages receives many wonderful literary magazine and alternative magazine titles each month to share with our readers. You can read more about some of these titles by clicking on the “New Mag Issues” under NewPages Blog or Mags. Find out more about many of these titles with our Guide to Literary Magazines and our Big List of Alternative Magazines. If you are a publication looking to be listed here or featured on our blog and social media, please contact us!

About Place, December 2022
Aji Magazine, 17
Atlanta Review, Fall/Winter 2022
The Baltimore Review, Fall 2022
Blink Ink, 50
Bomb, Winter 2023
Boulevard, 110 & 111
Brick, 110
Cave Wall, Number 17
Communities, Winter 2022
Cutleaf, 2.24
december, Fall/Winter 2022

Continue reading “New & Noted Lit & Alt Mags – December 2022”

New Book :: instead, it is dark

instead, it is dark by Cynthia Hogue book cover image

instead, it is dark by Cynthia Hogue
Red Hen Press, April 2023

Following her husband’s massive heart attack, Cynthia Hogue began writing poems based on dreams and memories that he, born during WWII in occupied France, had as a child growing up in a time of vast postwar food shortages. Hogue embarked on a quest to discover if there were more such memories in her extended family in France. When asked, family members told her never-before-shared tales of parents who were POWs, collaborators, Resistance fighters, and one most vulnerable—of a hidden child. Hogue spent years researching the lives of civilians during war, work crystallized in her tenth collection of poetry, instead, it is dark. The personal is alchemized as Hogue weaves history and present day in poems that explore how there, here, an individual voice in the stark language of lyric poetry, speaks a complex truth and casts a laser light on violence, resilience, survival, and—the heart of this collection—love.