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Published July 30, 2015 Posted By
Molly Lynch give us 10 books to entertain, inspire and encourage young feminists - agree? disagree?

150 Years of Wonderland is on exhibit at The Morgan Library & Museum, with an online exhibition available for mouse click travelers.

Follow that up with Anarchy in Wonderland: Vivienne Westwood's anti-capitalist take on Alice's Adventures on NewStatesman.

Washington Post's Valerie Strauss examines Common Core and Martin Luther King Jr.: Is this any way to teach his famous letter from jail?

What do Americans look like in Arabic literature? Columnist Marcia Lynx Qualey @arablit explores Portraits of Americans in Arabic literature.

I could have used a couple of these when I first began smartphone reading: 5 Tips for Reading Serious Literature on Smartphones.

And Dartmouth College is running a contest to see what artificial intelligence can create the most human-like writing and music entries.

NER Focus on China

Published July 30, 2015 Posted By
Volume 36.2 of New England Review includes a Focus on China, with first English translation of poems by Xiao Kaiyu, Ya Shi, and Yin Lichuan; Wei An's ruminations on nature just north of Beijing; Wendy Willis on Ai Weiwei's blockbuster show at Alcatraz; and fiction by Chinese-born American writer Michael X. Wang.

new-england-reviewEditor Speer Morgan writes in his Editor's Note: "At NER, the door has always been open to translations, from any language, but Chinese literature has been missing from our pages since 1987, when we published David Hinton's rendition of classical Chinese poet Tu Fu. So for this issue we reached out in order to bring more of it in. We've assembled a handful of contemporary works translated from Chinese as well as works pertaining to China written in English. This is not an attempt to present some kind of overview—not at all—but rather we're doing what NER does best, that is, offering a lively sample of what's new and good. They're presented not as a discrete section but are integrated into the issue as a whole, because it turns out that the China-related pieces in this issue speak just as often, and sometimes more clearly, to the other works assembled here as to each other."
better-than-war-siamak-vossoughiSince 1983, the University of Georgia Press has annualy held their Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction, which, according to their website, “was established to encourage gifted emerging writers by bringing their work to a national readership.” Siamak Vossoughi’s winning collection Better Than War will be published in September 2015.

From the publisher’s description: “The stories in Better Than War encompass narratives from a diverse set of Iranian immigrants, many searching for a balance between memories of their homeland and their new American culture. [ . . . ] All Iranian immigrants, young or old, carry with them a vivid past in their contemporary life. Vossoughi’s Better Than War is about growing up, coming of age, and raising children in America while still remembering the importance of retaining Iranian pride.”

Preorder your copy of Better Than War at the University of Georgia Press website.

New Editors @ Beloit Poetry Journal

Published July 28, 2015 Posted By
With little fanfare, John Rosenwald and Lee Sharkey have stepped down as The Editors of Beloit Poetry Journal, roles they have held for nearly 25 years.

The publication has a long and romantic history - starting up at Beloit College, declaring its independence to defy the opinions of those who would censor it, and moving from Wisconsin to Maine while keeping its place-based name, establishing an international reputation for contemporary poetry. Writers speak of 'not being ready yet' to submit to BPJ, but someday, they will; or of being rejected, they smile - as though accomplishing the attempt was enough (and they always say, "I got the nicest rejection..."). Sigh. There just aren't many such stories as those nowadays with the revolving door of publication start ups and closures, hundreds of lit mags to submit to, mass submission processes where writers don't even know the publications they've sent work to.

Beloit Poetry Journal's history is a good read and reminder of the literary journals that paved the way for so many others. And not just publications, but the people involved with them: editors, readers, writers, publishers. All of us.

Having known John and Lee (and Ann Arbor) for well over a decade now, I know this decision to pass on the publication was not an easy one. Please readers, understand, it was within their power to end Beloit Poetry Journal and call it a good run. Stepping away is hard enough, but handing over a publication with such an incredible reputation was not so much a decision as a process that took several years to come through. My appreciation and admiration to John and Lee and Ann for all of their hard work and dedication to writers AND readers. They never separated the importance of those two roles through the years they ran the journal, which is what makes it so well known today within the literary community.

I see John and Lee are still listed in the publication as "Senior Editors," so I'm sure they will continue on in some advisory capacity. But I have also met the new editors: Melissa Crowe and Rachel Contreni Flynn. I know they will look to their Senior Editors in the years to come to guide them, but I already sense that they will have strength and creativity of their own to take the journal into the next great phase of its existence.

Melissa and Rachel provide a short note about the transition here. I like how in it, and elsewhere on the site, the role of Editor is referred to as handling the day-to-day operations of the journal. But as the literary community had come to know first David and Marion Stocking, then John Rosenwald, Lee Sharkey, and Ann Arbor as the face(s) of Beloit Poetry Journal - there is a great deal more responsibility to being the Editor of a journal than simply running the day-to-day. That day-to-day may actually feel like the work of it all, but much more than that is required to maintain a good literary publication. A great literary publication. One of the best.

The tangible, the day-to-day, that will be the easy part. It's the other, the expectations, that become the true responsibility. The expectations of writers, of readers, of other editors, other publications, of teachers, of students, of the up-and-coming, of the established, of yourselves - most of all - of yourselves. Continually satisfy these changing expecations of the collective imagination, sustain this, and you will have a publication people know internationally. For decades. It has been done. It can be done.

My best to Melissa and Rachel. No cliches about shoes to fill. You have already done that or you wouldn't be here already. Ten years from now, let's look back, talk about where Beloit Poetry Journal has been and imagine where you see it going.

Big Muddy 2014 Contest Winners

Published July 28, 2015 Posted By
hannah-gildeaBig Muddy: A Journal of the MIssissippi River Valley issue 15.1 features winning entries from their 2014 contests:

Wilda Hearne Flash Fiction Contest
Jeannine Dorian Vesser, Missouri, "That Summer"

Mighty River Short Story Contest
Hannah Gildea [pictured], Oregon, "Cottonmouth"

2014 contest winners for full-length works to be published by Southeast Missouri State University Press include:

Cowles Poetry Book Prize
Angie Macri, Underwater Panther
Publication Date: September 1, 2015

Nilsen Literary Prize for a First Novel
James Tate Hill, Academy Gothic
Publication Date: October 1, 2015

The Masters Review 2015 Anthology

Published July 28, 2015 Posted By
kevin-brockmeierThe Masters Review volume IV features ten authors whose stories were selected by Kevin Brockmeier [pictured] as "The Best Stories by Emerging Writers." The Masters Review has two submission periods per year, one for new voices published online, and the print anthology, which in the past was open to just those in graduate-level programs.

This year's anthology opened to submissions "from emerging writers of all kinds." Editor Kim Winternheimer writes, "As The Masters Review grows in its literary pursuits, its focus remains on celebrating and promoting new and emerging authors. Yet, by showcasing writers from a single demographic we were limiting our platform. As we mark our fourth year, we are thrilled to embrace a growing range of voices."

Winternheimer comments that while nonfiction entries were submitted, none were selected for this final colletion, making this anthology an all-fiction issue. Authors and works included can be found here, as well as a link to the shortlist of finalists.
Rounding out its first year of publication, Crab Fat Literary Magazine has four print issues (August, November, February, May) and a 'best of' anthology in addition to its online collection from posting new writing every other Sunday of the year.

Founding/Managing Editor Caseyrenée Lopez and Fiction Editor Ella Ann Weaver oversee the publication of fiction, creative non-fiction, poetry, flash fiction, interviews, art/photography, and experimental/hybrid work. They will consider audio/video of readings, but it's not something they've published regularly.

The motivation for starting CFLM, Caseyrenée tells me, was "to join the conversation. My educational background is focused on queer writing/publishing, and supporting minority voices was the next step for me. I also wanted to see what was out there; starting Crab Fat has provided me with interactions and experience I wouldn't have gained otherwise."

Most intriguing to me is that name – Crab Fat. Where on earth did that come from? Caseyrenée says, "I wanted something memorable and cool, but was struggling to find something that would vibe with my goal of highlighting awkward/experimental/queer prose and poetry. A few days before I committed to buying a domain, my husband and I were at breakfast and started calling out random phrases and obscure words. He suggested 'crab fat' because we'd been listening to Crudbump's Illuminati Shit. Our favorite line in the song is 'rock a big gut, that's my crab fat' and we'd been making jokes about his chubby belly being 'crab fat.' So really, the name Crab Fat is a weird mashup of rap lyrics and body positivity."

In keeping with the unique name, readers can expect to find "a little bit of this and a little bit of that," Caseyrenée tells me. "We feature a wide variety of voices and offer an eclectic mix of contemporary content. We are progressive and like to publish work that goes against the grain of mainstream." To that end, during their first year CFLM has featured writing from Adam Kuta, Edward A. Boyle, D.S. West, Haley Fedor, Alana I. Capria, Philicia Montgomery, and Susannah Betts.

The future for CFLM will include pushing the genre limits and incorporating more experimental work into the magazine. "We want work that breaks conventions and makes us question what we know about genre" says Caseyrenée, "so we are actively reaching out to a wider audience than before. We are also trying to raise money through tip-jar submissions, a GoFundMe campaign, a cool image prompt contest, and sales of our print anthology. We want to pay writers for their work, even if it is just a token payment, to show that we appreciate all of their hard work." Crab Fat also actively works to recognize writers through nominations for the Pushcart Prize and Best of the Net.

CFLM's print anthology is published under the Damaged Goods Press imprint. Caseyrenée is the founder of both, so in a sense, they're sister sites/publications. The quarterly magazine is available as PDF and print, and the every other Sunday installments on available online. Submissions are accepted a rolling basis using Submittable.

Ruminate 2015 Nonfiction Winners

Published July 23, 2015 Posted By
ruminate-35Ruminate Summer 2015 includes the first and second place winners and the honorable mention of the 2015 VanderMey Nonfiction Prize judged by Scott Russel Sanders.

First Place
D.L. Mayfield for Blessed are the Pure in Heart

Second Place
Elizabeth Dark Wiley for "If you Want it to Last..."

Honorable Mention
Shannon Huffman Polson for Naked: A Triptych
Drunken Boat #21 includes work from each of the finalists for the DB Book Contest. The contest was opened to opened to poetry, translations, and hybrid works. The editors received nearly 300 manuscripts which were narrowed down to 10 finalists. Forrest Gander chose the winner of the contest: Collier Nogue's The Ground I Stand on is Not My Ground, a book that utilizes QR codes that link up to a website to create a truly immersive multimedia experience.

The finalists contest: Diana Thow translating Amelia Rosselli; Eleanor Goodman; Amaranth Borsuk and Gabriela Jauregui; Amy Pence; Catherine Hammond translating Carmen Boullosa; Collier Nogues; Elisabeth Murawski; Haley Larson; Meredith Stricker; Michael Leong; and Stephanie Anderson.

Samples of their work can be read on Drunken Boat #21 here.

SHR Auburn Witness Poetry Prize

Published July 21, 2015 Posted By
jake-adam-yorkThe newest issue of Southern Humanities Review (v48 n4) includes a special poetry section featuring the winner, runners-up and finalists for the 2014 Auburn Witness Poetry Prize honoring Jake Adam York (pictured; 1972-2012).

WINNER
Amanda Gunn
Gunn was the guest of honor at "Abide": A Tribute to Jake Adam York and His Work, October 2014.

RUNNERS-UP
Julia Kolchinsky Dasbach
Shara Lessley

FINALISTS
Lauren Camp
Kai Carlson-Wee
Joshua Gage
Jennifer Horne
Jeremy Keenan Jackson
Anna Leahy
Enid Shomer
David Tucker
Seth Brady Tucker
Richard Tyler

The Fiddlehead Summer Fiction Issue

Published July 21, 2015 Posted By
fiddlehead-summer-2015I couldn't help but to share this snippet from Mark Jarman's editorial remarks for the summer fiction issue of The Fiddlehead (n264):
I will be brief: this is an amazing collection, an astounding summer fiction issue. Look at the stories and writers from around the globe, writers new and proven: no one else in Canada can touch what we are doing right now.

There I've said it; the gods of the small mags can strike me down.
Rather than being struck down, I hope this encourages readers to take look (a couple can be read full text online) and judge for themselves!

New Lit on the Block :: Polychrome Ink

Published July 20, 2015 Posted By
polychrome-inkPolychrome Ink is a new biannual print and e-published journal with the mission to highlight that diversity is not a niche market, but a mass market.

"Polychrome Ink is run by a group of diverse friends," Executive Editor Em Salgado explained to me. "We met due to a mutual love of literature. During frequent literary discussions, we often noticed a shortage of characters that represented any of our individual diversity points, which only further highlighted what we felt was lacking. The need to see ourselves normalized in the literature being produced and the literature we love became our raison d'être. Eventually we grew tired of simply talking about it and decided to take matters into our own hands."

At the editorial helm along with Em are Associate Editor Zire Fournier, Copy Editor Kimmia Masterson, and Assistant Associate Editor Zaira Fournier. Additionally, Polychrome Ink currently has eight specialty editors who assist with topics and themes in which they have experience. For example, if Polychrome Ink receives a submission with any of the following themes: gay male, genderqueer, religious, neuroatypical — the editors send that submission to Aaron for review because he, himself, is a gay neuroatypical genderqueer individual who studies theology.

Unique to this publication, writers who submit may choose the editor that they feel best suits their work. Em explained, "The process of selecting an editor with the appropriate diversity points and literary interests helps to assure writers that their submission is being reviewed by someone that their work will resonate with the most — thus making the relationship between writer and editor more personal."

Even the name Polychrome Ink speaks to the diversity of the publication: "We were looking for a moniker that represented diversity," Em said, "and by extension, diversity in writing. Polychrome means multicolored, yet does not have the same connotation as rainbow, since our demographic extends beyond LGBTQIA+ themes. And Ink, of course, represents the writing itself."

Readers of Polychrome Ink can expect to find a collection of short fiction, creative nonfiction, flash fiction, essays, and poetry written by diverse authors and/or with diverse themes. Em explains that "Polychrome Ink seeks to share authentic voices and quality literature, covering an array of genres and topics, with the hopes that the work resonates with readers."

For their inaugural issue, the featured author was Tessa Gratton, alongside Emma Mauze, Frances Kimpel, D. Michael Warren, Shana Bulhan Haydock, David Perlmutter, Yuan Changming, Anders Scott, Jan Steckel, Robin Wyatt Dunn, Courtney Hamel, Kim Luna, Jaycee Boydgarcia, Alex Franco, Malcolm Friend, and Stephen Mead.

"In terms of the future," Em told me, "we will continue providing an outlet and resource for writers and readers alike. We would like to be amidst the publications everyone looks to for original diverse literature. We also have plans to expand our staff — thus broadening the diverse spectrum of our editorial team."

Polychrome Ink accepts submissions via email and is approaching the end of the submission period for Volume II — which releases in October. (Submissions close July 31.) There is no reading fee and the publication is a paying market with hopes that as readership grows, so will the compensation to writers.

Poem :: Sara Marron and Michael Reich

Published July 16, 2015 Posted By
sara-marronThe Lucy cell
the stock exchange creating a consciousness
the computer, functioning on man-made algorithms
corrects its own mistakes
error-correction is a sign of
(to a computer)
a sign of its own conscious
its own identity...

From [Language] CSS and HTML [/Language] by Sara Marron and Michael Reich
Chagrin River Review, Issue 6 (Spring 2015)

Flash Fiction :: Kelly Charlton

Published July 15, 2015 Posted By
As I head into my "summer off" I can honestly say I appreciate this hardcore look at teaching. I'll use this as my retrospective for the month:

"At age 26, your first teaching assignment shattered your dreams. Your students preferred other forms of entertainment such as talking on their cell phones or discussing who was sleeping with whom to studying Shakespeare and dangling participles. Most had no clue how to express themselves using a complete sentence, and if you'd had a whisky shot for every time you read an essay containing the word 'cuz,' you would have become a fine drunk, which in retrospect doesn't sound so bad."

From "A Guide for the Burned Out Teacher" by Kelly Charlton published in Crab Fat Literary Magazine online content, July 2, 2015.

MFA Attitude Adjustment

Published July 15, 2015 Posted By
charlotte-morgantiAmidst all the debate about the "value" of higher education and the "overabundance" of MFAs being turned out of programs these days, it was refreshing to read Charlotte Morganti's Eight Reasons to Considering Pursing an MFA on Fiction Southeast. What a great reminder that it's okay to want to go to school to LEARN not just to EARN. Morganti writes, "Initially I enrolled in my MFA program for two reasons – to learn the craft and to hang out with some really cool people. By the time I earned the degree, I had benefited in many other ways as well." She invites readers in or pursuing MFAs to give their own reasons for enrolling in a program, as well as responses to these two questions: Did your MFA give you benefits you dind't expect when you first enrolled? If you opted no to pursue and MFA, what were your primary reasons?

Graphic Narrative: Emily Steinberg

Published July 14, 2015 Posted By
emily-steinberg"First sort through Emily Steinberg's A Mid Summer Soirée in quick succession," writes Tahneer Oksman, Graphic Narratives Reviews Editor of Cleaver Magazine, "Then go back and read it slowly."

I did just that, and found that as I progressed through the images with accompanying text, I became more and more amused by the story of each whimsical character.

"He thought his Linen Suit was the way to go."
"She wondered if her new Coif was appropriate for an evening soiree."
"He'd received the invite only a day before and felt decidedly B-listed."

There's no transition to connect the images and stories to one another, other than the overall title. As Oksman writes, "Trying to fill in the narrative gaps is part of the pleasure of the journey, as is, on the contrary, moving past those gaps in favor of experiencing the piece's seductive rhythm."

Going back through it slowly allows time to absorb the artwork, which is fantastic collage/sketch design work. Using newspaper, with lots of crosswords sections, some of Steinberg's images have almost an exquisite corpse feel to them that makes it both disconcerting and impossible to look away.

Need a Prompt? Try These!

Published July 13, 2015 Posted By

themaLooking for an idea to get your writing started today? Try THEMA literary journal! Each issue of THEMA is based on a different unusual theme. The journal is designed to provide readers with a unique and entertaining collection of artistic theme interpretations, in the form of stories, poetry, black-and-white artwork, and photography. It also provides a stimulating forum for established and emerging literary artists and serves as source material and inspiration for teachers of creative writing.

Upcoming themes and dealines for submission:

The Neat Lady and the Colonel's Overalls
November 1, 2015

Drop the Zucchini and Run!
March 1, 2016

Second Thoughts
July 1, 2016

"The premise given," the editors write, "must be an integral part of the plot, not necessarily the central theme but not merely incidental." For more information, visit THEMA.

Chariton Short Fiction Prize Winners

Published July 13, 2015 Posted By
chariton-reviewThe Spring 2015 issue of Chariton Review features the winner and finalists of their 2015 Short Fiction Prize, judged by Christine Sneed. This winner of this annual award for the best unpublished short fiction on any theme up to 5,000 words in English receives a prize of $500 and two or three finalists will receive $200 each. All U.S. entrants will receive a complimentary copy of the Spring prize issue in which the winners are published.

2015 Winner
"Sugar Bowl" by Jo DeWaal

Finalists
"Delivery in Göteborg" by Mike Lewis-Beck
"Die Laughing" by Kim Norris
"Big Sisters" by Louise Kantro


Books :: Marsh Hawk Press Poetry Prize

Published July 08, 2015 Posted By
no-map-of-the-earth-includes-stars-christina-olivaresThe Marsh Hawk Press Poetry Prize is awarded annually, with a first prize of $1,000 and publication. During this past May, the 2014 winner was published: No Map of the Earth Includes Stars by Christina Olivares.

Also the winner of YesYes Books’s 2014 Vinyl 45 Chapbook Competition with her chapbook Petition, Olivares has poems published or forthcoming in Five Quarterly, decomP, Vinyl Poetry, and PALABRA, among others.

Check out the Marsh Hawk Press website for more information about No Map of the Earth Includes Stars or pick up a copy.

Ricochet Review

Published July 08, 2015 Posted By
ricochet-reviewStudent poets guided by faculty and editorial editors at Chicago's Von Steuben Metropolitan Science Center comprise the editorial board of Ricochet Review, an annual poetry magazine that strives to publish both established and emerging writers who work in poetry and/or poetry translations from various languages and various forms of art. The newest issue (#3) features translation from both underrepresented and major languages, as well as through ekphrasis.

Ricochet Review is unique among literary magazines because of its "Apprentice Poet and Master Poet Mentorship Exchange." This is an opportunity for high school poets to hone their craft through a guided, workshop-style collaboration between experienced, published, and talented master poets, who understand the art of poetry and how to convey it. High school students who wish to be mentored should highlight their interest in their cover letter when submitting their poems. The editorial board will then contact chosen participants.

Ricochet Review is currently accepting national and international submissions from high school students, college students, and non-students. The theme for their next issue: "Macabre and Grotesque." The editors write, "We are looking for any type of poetry and translation directly or indirectly inspired by the macabre and/or grotesque." The reading period ends February 1, 2016.

Poetry Resource for Teachers

Published July 07, 2015 Posted By
The Teacher's Lounge on the League of Canadian Poets website offers some great resource essays and lesson plans:

Encouraging Amazing Writing by Dawna Proudman
Inspiring Writing that Makes You Stand Up and Cheer by Dawna Proudman
Performing your Work: Finding the Actor Inside of You by Penn Kemp
Get Rhythm: teaching students to hear rhythm and metre by Katherine Parrish
Keep it Simple: Concrete Imagery in Poetry by Michael Mirolla
Dispelling the 5-7-5 Myth: A Haiku Lesson for Elementary Students by Naomi Beth Wakan
Canadian Poets Across the Curriculum: Al Purdy and the Dorsets by Kathryn Bjornson
Canadian Poets Across the Curriculum: Fred Wah and Joy Kogawa by Kathryn Bjornson
Digital Spaces, Reading, and Poetics by Aaron Tucker
Identity and Autobiography by Aaron Tucker
Teaching Form Poetry by Yvonne Blomer


Writing Dialogue - Or Not

Published July 07, 2015 Posted By
samsun-knightWriter Samsun Knight explores the role of conversational dialogue in fiction: "...in reality, nobody ever talks to anyone else. What speech actually achieves is a communication between one person and that person's idea of the other. Most of the time there is no difference, no discernible difference, between such verisimilitude and the truth. But the best dialogue will manifest this disparity in subtle, slender ways. It will show how, in speaking, we fail to speak."

Read the rest of his commentary in Glimmer Train Bulletin #102 along with other craft essays from authors recently published in Glimmer Train Stories.
august-po-poPaul Nelson, poet and lead organizer of the August Poetry Postard Festival has sent the first update for this year's event!

For you newbies, the August PoPo Fest goes like this: You sign up. You get a list of 31 names/addresses of other people who signed up. Starting late June, you write a poem a day on a postcard and mail it off to the next person on the list, so by the end of the month, you will have (hopefully) written and sent 31 poems and (hopefully) received 31 poems.

The poems are not supposed to be pre-written or something you've been working on for months. This is an exercise is the spontaneous, the demanding, the gut-driven, the postcard inspired - whatever it is that gets you to write once a day, each day, and send it off into the world.

I've done this event since it began, and it is now in its ninth year! I don't always keep to a poem a day; sometimes I get ahead one day, or catch up another, with several poems in one day. But I try my best. The event does get me thinking of poetry in my every day, when I rarely have time for it, and writing it down - something I have time for even more rarely.

I've received poems from across the state, the country and around the globe. I've gotten postcards made from cereal boxes, some with gorgeous original artwork, and lots of the lovely tacky tourist cards from travel destinations. I have cards from "famous" poets, and some who have since become more famous, and some never signed, so I'll never know, and it hardly matters. I've gotten poetry. Sent to me directly. From strangers. Lovely, strange, absurd, and funny. Poetry.

It's an amazing event, and I hope you will take the challenge and join in this year. For the first time EVER, the organizers have decided to charge a nominal fee for the event ($10). I can only imagine the amount of work it is to run this (with up to 300 people participating), and keeping up virtual space to promote it. I'm not dissuaded by the fee, knowing the extraordinary event that it is, and knowing I've spent 100 times that on conferences from which I've gotten a great deal less inspiration...

So, please writers, wanna-bes and needs-a-kick-in-the-arsers, poetry lovers, postcard lovers - this event is for you. Join us!

Gulf Coast 2014 Barthelme Prize Winners

Published July 06, 2015 Posted By

gulf-coast-summer-fall-2015The winner and honorable mentions of the 2014 Barthelme Prize are featured in the Summer/Fall 2015 issue of Gulf Coast:

2014 Barthelme Prize
Amy Hempel, Judge

Winner
Emma Bolden, "Gifted"

Honorable Mentions
Patty Yumi Cottrell, "No One Makes Plans"
Susan Lilley, "Delmonicos"

The Barthelme Prize for Short Prose is open to pieces of prose poetry, flash fiction, and micro-essays of 500 words or fewer. The contest awards its winner $1,000 and publication in the journal. Two honorable mentions will receive $250, and all entries will be considered for paid publication on the Gulf Coast website as Online Exclusives.


Lamar York Prize Winners

Published July 02, 2015 Posted By
amy-clarkThe Chattahoochee Review Spring 2015 includes the winners of the Lamar York Prizes for story, judged by David James Poissant, and essay, judged by Marcia Aldrich. Each winner receives $1000 and publication. This year's recipients are Joel Wayne for "Brother's Keeper" (fiction) and Amy Clark (pictured) for "The Rocks" (nonfiction). A complete list of finalists can be found here.
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