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Book Reviews by Title - T (87)

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  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Ludmilla Petrushevskaya
  • Translated From Russian
  • by Anna Summers
  • Date Published January 2013
  • ISBN-13 978-0-14-312152-7
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 171pp
  • Price $15.00
  • Review by Olive Mullet
Ludmilla Petrushevskaya’s title tells us we should expect wry humor and irony in these 17 short stories. They are set in ironically coveted post-Revolution Moscow apartment buildings, divided and subdivided into tiny units, shared by hardly affluent citizens. Yet these people carry on in unexpected and convoluted love relationships. Translator Anna Summers tells us that the four sections of this latest collection, which encompasses Petrushevskaya’s earliest and latest stories, include:
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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Stan Sanvel Rubin
  • Date Published September 2013
  • ISBN-13 978-0-9883166-6-9
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 88pp
  • Price $18.00
  • Review by Andrea Dulberger
The beautiful cover image for this book of poetry—a painting by an artist named Linda Okazaki—features an animal, probably a fox, alone on a bridge over a vast expanse of water, with trees and mountains in the distance under an orange-red sky. There is a mythical quality to this painting that matches the energy of the best poems in Stan Sanvel Rubin’s There. Here. In this fourth full-length book by Rubin, I find an author who sometimes muses about life in direct, observant narratives and, at other times, offers images with the compression of Zen koans.
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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Michael Teig
  • Date Published November 2013
  • ISBN-13 978-1-938160-20-2
  • Format Paperback
  • Price $16.00
  • Review by Elizabeth O'Brien
Michael Teig’s second poetry collection, There’s a Box in the Garage You Can Beat with a Stick, is a romping book, full of syntactic (and synaptic) leaps. Organized in three parts, two of which begin with meditations on the possibilities of boxes, these poems hint at a diverse poetic lineage, possibly including James Tate, the New York School poets, and Sombrero Fallout-era Richard Brautigan. Teig finds occasion for poetry in chickens and waltzes and monkeys and hats, and the speaker addresses readers in a casual, friendly mode. The diction of the poems ranges from officious to fanciful, sometimes in the same intake of breath, which is at times both confusing and exhilarating.
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  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Matthew Pitt
  • Date Published August 2017
  • ISBN-13 978-1-938126-37-6
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 200pp
  • Price $16.95
  • Review by MacKenzie Hamilton

The twelve stories in These Are Our Demands dip their toes into potential futures and alternate realities. The characters in Matthew Pitt’s stories are vivid and sassy, and the writing is otherworldly. This collection lures you in with the promise of comfort, and then pulls down the straps and sends you on an unexpected wild ride. The stories have an unrivaled originality that is bound to keep you reading till the las page.

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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Matthew Rohrer
  • Date Published 2008
  • Format Chapbook
  • Pages 43pp
  • Price $10.00
  • Review by Brian Foley
Described as “a rollicking epic adventure poem of foxy revolutionaries battling a fascist government,” the guts of Matthew Rohrer’s newest chapbook ask for more than just lighthearted fanfare. A departure from the thoughtful and romantic altered-states found in his defining collections Satellite and last year’s Rise Up, They All Seemed Asleep is a minor politically driven marathon that confronts the outrage and confusion brought on by authoritarian powers.
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  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Jodi Paloni
  • Date Published May 2016
  • ISBN-13 978-1-941209-38-7
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 204pp
  • Price $17.95
  • Review by Allyson Hoffman

They Could Live with Themselves by Jodi Paloni is a strong collection of short stories linked by the rural town of Stark Run, Vermont. The stories range in point of view and voice, from first-person perspectives of children to third-person point of view closely following a grandfather. Each story is self-contained yet enhanced by the others so that the collection ends with a clear picture of the New England town. Full of quiet tensions and unforgettable characters, Paloni’s collection presses into the daily conflicts and triumphs of the characters in ways that are both familiar and new.

  • Subtitle Elizabeth J. Colen, John Jodzio, Tim Jones-Yelvington, Sean Lovelace, Mary Miller
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  • Date Published May 2011
  • ISBN-13 978-0984616619
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 248pp
  • Price $15.95
  • Review by Gina Myers
They Could No Longer Contain Themselves brings together the winner of the third annual Rose Metal Press short short chapbook contest and four of the finalists from the fourth annual contest, resulting in an off-beat, varied, and vital flash fiction collection. The work presented here by Elizabeth J. Colen, John Jodzio, Tim Jones-Yelvington, Sean Lovelace, and Mary Miller shows a range of style and concerns; however, each author presents work that is lively and engaging, making this an essential collection to anyone interested in not just flash fiction but fiction in general. As Rose Metal Press editors Abigail Beckel and Kathleen Rooney write in the preface, “For all of the differences in writing style, technique, and theme, the characters throughout these five chapbooks are barely contained and bursting out.”
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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Michael Earl Craig
  • Date Published August 2010
  • ISBN-13 978-1-933517-46-9
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 128pp
  • Price $14.00
  • Review by Matt McBride
In Thin Kimono, Michael Earl Craig’s third book, Craig is a kind of Whitman for post-Google America, where everything is exchangeable and incongruous elements continually collide, creating an equalizing strangeness where no one thing is more important than another. This strangeness, however, doesn’t remove Craig from the world, but rather is his method of being in the world.
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  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Anthony McCann
  • Date Published September 2014
  • ISBN-13 978-1-933517-96-4
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 128pp
  • Price $18.00
  • Review by Elizabeth O’Brien
“The Day,” the first poem Anthony McCann’s latest poetry collection, Thing Music, from Wave Books, begins:

In this coupling
     of speech
  where everything
begins     where
shimmering
began
    please
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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Divya Victor
  • Date Published April 2014
  • ISBN-13 ISBN-13: 978-193425452-3
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 128pp
  • Price $15.00
  • Review by Trena Machado
The reader has a lot of work to do after entering Divya Victor’s piece of expression, Things To Do With Your Mouth. The writing is a hybrid of text, speech, and performance. The body, the vocal cords, the mouth. This is about who can speak and be heard and who cannot, about who has power in the system and who does not, and we experience this from the side of those who are not heard and who do not have power in the system.
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