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Book Reviews by Title - M (109)

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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Gina Myers
  • Date Published August 2009
  • ISBN-13 978-0-578-02739-5
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 74pp
  • Price $15.00
  • Review by Cynthia Reeser
Aside from the eye catching distressed-look cover design of Gina Myers's new poetry collection, A Model Year, one of the endorsement blurbs on the back cover snared my attention. The blurb wherein critically acclaimed poet Joseph Lease assigns to Myers work a "New York school sprezzetura" informed my reading of Myers's collection, which is one good reason I usually forego the reading of such matter until after my initial opinion has been formed. Not so this time.
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  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Joan Aiken
  • Date Published April 2011
  • ISBN-13 978-1-931520-74-4
  • Format Hardcover
  • Pages 203pp
  • Price $24.00
  • Review by Laura Pryor
British author Joan Aiken died in 2004, leaving behind a huge volume of work, including over a hundred books. She began with short stories, and this collection of nineteen tales is a fun introduction to Aiken’s quirky, imaginative style. The word “tale” is particularly apt for these stories; many of them read like old folk tales handed down through generations.
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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Kate Hanson Foster
  • Date Published May 2011
  • ISBN-13 978-0931507274
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 64pp
  • Price $15.00
  • Review by Renee Emerson
Mid Drift is Kate Hanson Foster’s first book of poems. Written in free verse, the poems are lyrical, dark as they plunge into snapshot memories of her past, and powerful. The poems take place in the city, at night, circling images of water, particularly of rivers, and the narrative, though only seen in glimpses, reveals a betrayal, an affair. Lowell is a recognized influence, in the last poem “Dear Lowell,” where the speaker claims, unconvincingly, to plan to leave the place she has written about so meticulously in poem after poem. The line in “Mill City,” “My mind is filthy with old, dear secrets” encapsulates the book—the speaker simultaneously holds the past “dear” yet recognizes it as “filthy.”
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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Timothy McBride
  • Date Published December 2010
  • ISBN-13 978-0-8101-2675-6
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 96pp
  • Price $15.95
  • Review by Renee Emerson
The Manageable Cold, Timothy McBride’s first poetry collection, is perfect to read in the midst of a hard winter. I was surprised to see that this was only his first book, since McBride writes with a confidence and skill that one would not expect from a new poet. McBride is not afraid to experiment with form, and the book includes forms ranging from free verse to villanelle to sonnet. He explores the theme of “manageable cold” through the physical coldness of winter, country life, relationships, and the bleak hardships of his father’s favorite sport, boxing.
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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Caroline Bergvall
  • Date Published January 2011
  • ISBN-13 978-0-9822645-8-4
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 164pp
  • Price $14.95
  • Review by Sima Rabinowitz
Bergvall’s bio is worth reading before engaging with Meddle English, and I say engaging (rather than reading) because this isn’t a book one reads in a traditional sense, but more like a book to be considered. Here’s the first paragraph of the poet’s page-long bio:
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  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Vincent Standley
  • Date Published August 2011
  • ISBN-13 978-0983163343
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 189pp
  • Price $18.00
  • Review by J. A. Tyler
A Mortal Affect, Vincent Standley’s debut novel and the latest release from Calamari Press, is all about creating a world, inventing a vocabulary, and then approaching a proposed conundrum of what it would be like to have a portion of the world immortal, and a portion not. Full of Dante-esque circles of assigned living, painted blue welfare blocs of housing, Rooters (the mortal creatures that populate the novel), and Malkings (the immortals who vie for appropriate living throughout A Mortal Affect), this is a book that attempts to grow a universe, roots and all, in a mere two hundred pages:
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  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Helen Oyeyemi
  • Date Published September 2011
  • ISBN-13 978-1-59448-807-8
  • Format Hardcover
  • Pages 324pp
  • Price $25.95
  • Review by Olive Mullet
For those familiar with the French folktale “Bluebeard,” especially in its various versions such as the British “Mr. Fox” and “Fitcher’s Bird,” Helen Oyeyemi’s novel Mr. Fox will delight. Even if you are not familiar with these other versions, you get them in this novel. You only need to love fairy tale convolutions, especially when blended with real-life situations.
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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Nicole Cooley
  • Date Published November 2010
  • ISBN-13 978-1-88295-83-8
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 78pp
  • Price $15.95
  • Review by Sima Rabinowitz
Milk Dress has many strengths, exhibiting great poetic control and elegance, but no aspect of the book is more interesting to me than Cooley’s successful linking of “world events” and “bodily/personal events,” her experience of pregnancy, birth, motherhood, illness, loss and birth (rebirth?) again “against” (“Write against narrative” she begins in “Homeland Security,” the opening poem) the events of 9/11, Hurricane Katrina, the daily news, the threat of global disaster. “Write against blankness,” she instructs herself, and, by implication, simultaneously instructs us: read against blankness (“white, white, white”), the empty post-terrorist sky; the empty post-pregnancy crib; the unturned (pre-and-post reading) page.
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  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Lizzy Acker
  • Date Published December 2010
  • ISBN-13 978-0-9789858-3-7
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 84pp
  • Price $12.00
  • Review by Tessa Mellas
Lizzy Acker’s book Monster Party is hard to categorize. Is it a fiction chapbook? A novella? A story cycle? Maybe a fictive autobiography? Maybe a collage of short-shorts? Or should we call it a badass bildungsromanesque manifesto with a poetic ode to the 90s computer game Oregon Trail thrown in? Whatever it is, it’s a must-read. Especially for all you 20 and 30-somethings who grew up on He-Man and Nick at Nite. And you literary types who have always wanted to do something gnarly and totally against-the-rules with metaphor. And especially all you who may be considering boob tubing it tonight—Acker’s protagonist would—but are thinking it’ll be loads more fun hanging out for eighty pages with a slacker tomboy named Lizzy who drools sarcasm, shoots Fourth-of-July bottle rockets out of her mouth, and accidentally participates in the murder of a possum because she thinks it’s mortally wounded when the poor critter is just playing dead. Trust me, friends. This hipster hip, tough girl, love-rock, indie narrative word-thing is for you.
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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Claudia Keelan
  • Date Published October 2009
  • ISBN-13 978-1930974869
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 79pp
  • Price $15.00
  • Review by Vince Corvaia
Missing Her is a moving, elegant series of poems, or elegies, that examines loss on both a very public and a private level. Keelan’s topics include Mary after the birth of Jesus, the Vietnam War, September 11th, Hurricane Katrina, and the death of her father. In “About Suffering They Were,” she writes, “There are no old poems, / Only new textbooks directing / The unprepared student to the painting / Behind the poem.” In Missing Her, we are all unprepared students, and Keelan leads us not merely to her poems but to the truths behind poetry.
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