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Editor's Picks New Book Arrivals (298)

Published October 18, 2017

The Walmart Book of the Dead - Editor's Pick

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The Walmart Book of the Dead was inspired by the ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead, funerary texts with accompanying illustrations containing spells to preserve the spirit of the deceased in the afterlife. In Lucy Biederman’s version, shoplifters, grifters, drifters, and hustlers, desirous children, greeters, would-be Marxists, wolves, and circuit court judges, wander Walmart unknowingly consigned to their afterlives.

Read more... Published October 18, 2017
Published September 12, 2017

A Girl’s a Gun

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Haunting and candid, Rachel Danielle Peterson’s debut collection A Girl’s A Gun introduces a poet whose bold voice merges heightened lyricism with compelling narrative. Taken together, the poems present the coming-of-age story of a girl born in the mountains of rural eastern Kentucky, tracing her journey into a wider world of experience. Exploring issues of identity, place, and the call to create, this collection tackles subjects that will shock, touch, and bewilder readers while giving voice to an underrepresented and perhaps even unprecedented perspective in poetry.

Read more... Published September 12, 2017
Published September 12, 2017

Attributed to the Harrow Painter

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Attributed to the Harrow Painter reckons with fatherhood, the violence of nostalgia, poetry, and the commodity world of visual art as the poems here frantically cycle through responses to the speaker’s son’s remark on a painting by Julian Schnabel that it “looks like garbage.” What does it mean to be a minor artist, the poems wonder, who is described by one critic as “indeed a minor talent, not withstanding the undeniable charm of some of his works”? What structures must be destroyed to clear the way for all the “minor” voices that litter the discourse of Western civilization?

Read more... Published September 12, 2017
Published September 12, 2017

Biketopia

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In a world with an uncertain future, do you imagine for the best- or for the worst-case scenario? Twelve writers tackle extreme solarpunk utopias and apocalyptic or political dystopias—and the grey areas in between—in Biketopia, the fourth volume of the Bikes in Space series of feminist science fiction stories about bicycling. Whatever your own future or present reality, these stories will motivate and inspire you to envision something different . . . and maybe even better.

Read more... Published September 12, 2017
Published September 12, 2017

All the Bayou Stories End with Drowned

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“Poems in Erica Wright’s virtuosic new collection, All the Bayou Stories End with Drowned, have an almost subliminal force. We read them with feline attention, hungering after each line’s fugitive beauty. These poems capture the quicksilver of inspiration, and hold it steady, the way a hummingbird seems motionless sipping from the bud.” –Gregory Pardlo

Read more... Published September 12, 2017
Published September 12, 2017

Latino Leaders Speak

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Originally presented at the Latino Leaders Luncheon Series in Washington, DC, and other major cities, the personal stories included in this book are all by successful Latinos involved in a variety of occupations. The importance of education is a common refrain in the lives of the leaders represented here. Many reference one particular teacher or mentor who made a difference. Others remember the sacrifices made by parents so that their children could have more opportunities for a better life. In all, these writings are both a testament to perseverance and a guide to life, for readers of all backgrounds.

Read more... Published September 12, 2017
Published September 12, 2017

Reassurance in Negative Space

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Elizabyth A. Hiscox's Reassurance in Negative Space is a debut collection with the seasoned deftness of a master in its keen intelligence, wit, innovative diction, unflinching handling of loss and grief, and deep lyricism. Hiscox muses with revelatory insights on such wide-ranging topics as multifarious netsuke, nuclear fallout, artichokes “coming into new brilliance,” the DMV line, the Zen of “the sublime [that] can spring from small things.” By turns ecstatic and somber, profane and sacred, wise and whimsical, Hiscox proves she is a poet of the first order with this memorable collection.

Read more... Published September 12, 2017
Published September 12, 2017

All My Heroes Are Broke

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All My Heroes Are Broke is a poetry collection written from the perspective of a first-generation American coming to terms with the implicit struggles and disillusionment of the “American Dream.” All My Heroes Are Broke primarily uses two forms: short, image driven poems inspired by the works of Robert Bly and Po Chu-I; and longer narrative poems that reveal more personal information about the speaker, in the manner of Li-Young Lee and Frank O’Hara, allowing the speaker to project his own life onto the surroundings and the people of those larger communities.

Read more... Published September 12, 2017
Published August 10, 2017

The Great Tower of Elfland

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Beginning in the mid-1950s, scholars proposed that the Inklings were a unified group centered on fantasy, imagination, and Christianity. This text overturns the misapplication of a divided worldview among two Inklings, J. R. R. Tolkien and C. S. Lewis, and their forerunners, G. K. Chesterton and George MacDonald. Analyzing their literary, scholarly, and interpersonal texts, Zachary A. Rhone’s The Great Tower of Elfland clarifies the unities of their thinking.

Read more... Published August 10, 2017
Published August 10, 2017

¡Manteca!

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Containing the work of more than 40 poets—equally divided between men and women—who self-identify as Afro-Latino, ¡Manteca! is the first poetry anthology to highlight writings by Latinos of African descent. The themes covered are as diverse as the authors themselves. Editor and scholar Melissa Castillo-Garsow writes in her introduction that “the experiences and poetic expression of Afro-Latinidad were so diverse” that she could not begin to categorize it. Some write in English, others in Spanish. They are Puerto Rican, Dominican, and almost every combination conceivable, including Afro-Mexican. Containing the work of well-known writers such as Pedro Pietri, Miguel Piñero and E. Ethelbert Miller, less well-known ones are ready to be discovered in these pages.

Read more... Published August 10, 2017
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