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Editor's Picks New Book Arrivals (251)

Published March 21, 2016

Poetry of Resistance

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Poetry of Resistance offers a selection of the works shared on the Facebook page called “Poets Responding to SB 1070,” started after nine Latino students chained themselves to the main doors of the Arizona State Capitol to protest Arizona’s SB 1070 in 2010. The works in this anthology address a wide variety of themes including racial profiling, xenophobia, cultural misunderstanding, violence against refugees, shared identity, and more. Contributors include poets such as Francisco Aragón, Devreaux Baker, Sarah Browning, Lorna Dee Cervantes, Susan Deer Cloud, among others, in a poetic call for tolerance, reflection, reconciliation, and healing.

Read more... Published March 21, 2016
Published March 21, 2016

100 Chinese Silences

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There are one hundred kinds of Chinese silences: the silence of the unknown grandfathers; the silence of borrowed Buddha and rebranded Confucius; the silence of alluring stereotypes and exotic reticence. These poems make those silences heard. These 100 Chinese silences unmask the imagined Asias of American literature, rewriting poets from Ezra Pound and Marianne Moore to Gary Snyder and Billy Collins. In a sharply critical and wickedly humorous travesty of the modern canon, Timothy Yu excavates the Asian (American) bones buried in our poetic language.

Read more... Published March 21, 2016
Published March 21, 2016

The Day After Death

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Amanda thinks about Duncan, her dead twin brother, every day. A traffic accident brings her face to face with deeper childhood memories, forcing her to wonder not just about Duncan’s death but also about the death of her college mentor and lover, Sarah Moore. Can her exploration of family secrets set her free from her traumatic past? Set against the background of therapy and the theater, Lynn C. Miller’s The Day after Death is filled with the stuff readers live for—identity, intimacy, and treachery.

Read more... Published March 21, 2016
Published March 21, 2016

The Art of History

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The second entry in Graywolf Press’s “Art of” series is a wide-angled look at how writers use historical events and figures in their prose. In The Art of History: Unlocking the Past in Fiction & Nonfiction, Bram delivers incisive chapters on research, period details, and more as a way of investigating the ongoing popularity of historical narratives. Refreshing comparisons of books by writers of fiction and nonfiction, such as Gabriel García Márquez and David McCullough, along with Bram’s incisive commentary, make this a timeless addition to the series.

Read more... Published March 21, 2016
Published February 18, 2016

The Yesterday Project

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The Yesterday Project finds Ben Doller and Sandra Doller undertaking a seemingly simple, stripped-down, though thoroughly brave and highly personal blind collaboration. Each separately wrote a document recording the previous day, every day, for 32 days, without sharing their work over the summer of 2014 in the shadow of a diagnosis of life-threatening illness: Melanoma cancer, Stage 3. The resulting work is a declaration of dependence—a relentlessly honest chronicle of shared identity and the risks inherent in deep connection.
Read more... Published February 18, 2016
Published February 18, 2016

Red Indian Road West

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Edited by Kurt Schweigman and Lucille Lang Day, this poetry anthology encompasses the entire range of Native American experience in California. The 31 Native poets from 29 tribes give voice to culture and traditions that intertwine with contemporary life in California. How do the cities, ecosystems, and people shape our lives, and how do we in turn affect the physical and cultural landscapes of California?
Read more... Published February 18, 2016
Published February 18, 2016

Not a Self-Help Book

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Marty Wu, compulsive reader of advice manuals, is easily flustered. She'd like to come across as poised and professional, but she trips over her own feet, spills coffee on her boss, blurts out things she's not supposed to say. The bulk of her brain matter, she decides, consists of gerbils "spinning madly in alternating directions." With a job she longs to quit and a formidable mother who's impossible to please, Marty ricochets between the stress of New York and the warmth of extended family in Taiwan. In a diary brimming with bi-cultural wisecracks, Marty confides her anxieties and frustrations, her pipe dream to open a boutique costume shop, and her discovery of family secrets old and new.
Read more... Published February 18, 2016
Published February 18, 2016

Are You Here For What I'm Here For?

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The suspense creeps in and takes hold in seven stories about troubled characters grappling with rare illnesses, menacing chance encounters, sexual awakening, impending natural disasters, and New Age cults. Within these pages, the everyday meets the uncanny as two high school friends go out for one unforgettable night. A boy, haunted by dreams of a catastrophic flood, becomes swept up in an encephalitis epidemic. A hypochondriac awaits her diagnosis at a Caribbean health resort. Even at its most surreal, this polished and lyrical debut remains grounded in the emotional lives of people teetering atop widening chasms of confusion and doubt.
Read more... Published February 18, 2016
Published February 18, 2016

The 7th Man

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In stark, fevered, poetic lines, Valen Arnoux confesses his intimate participation in 131 executions. As a prison guard and member of the strap down team, he is compelled to rehearse, to perfect his timing and skills, to synchronize his movements with the precise choreography of the team. Each member takes his turn playing the role of the condemned, "because no body is the same, and every man responds differently." These theatrical performances catalyze an uncanny sense of identification-any man might be himself, his closest friend, his brother . . .
Read more... Published February 18, 2016
Published January 20, 2016

Whiskey, Etc.

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Strolling like a possum through neighborhood yards, Sherrie Flick takes it all in: the paperboy seduced over a glass of milk; the dinner prepared for a dead man; the boy on the foyer floor considering a spray of yellow paint. In Whiskey, Etc., it’s the particulars that draw you closer—the stained coffee cups, curled-up dogs, wood–burning stoves and canoes snug in their sheds—to a muddled loneliness housed behind crystalline windows. To follow Flick’s cowboy–possum saunter across these dazzling short (short) stories is to visit life, desperate and languid and dolefully funny, where it happens.

Read more... Published January 20, 2016
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