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Published May 28, 2012
phren-Z is a quarterly online literary magazine published by Santa Cruz Writes. phren-Z promotes the work of writers with a connection to Santa Cruz County, California, publishing fiction, non-fiction, poetry, plays, monologues, essays, and interviews.

Editors Karen Ackland (fiction), Julia Chiapella (poetry), and Jory Post (non-fiction, plays, and monologues) started phren-Z “ to develop and sustain a vibrant literary community dedicated to the craft of writing and its ability to inform, reveal, and enchant.” As such, readers can find writing in all genres from both established and emerging writers with a connection to Santa Cruz County, California. The Floodlight section provides in depth coverage on a given topic - a specific writer, event, or other issue of significance to the local literary community.

“phren-Z is community oriented,” say the editors, “so each issue will feature a public reading of contributors work, read by the authors themselves. We also will continue to seek opportunities for writers to get their work in front of the public including, but not limited to, radio performances, community TV performances, and an annual printed edition.”

Works available for online reading include essays by Wallace Baine, Don Rothman, Karen Ackland, Sarah Albertson, Vinnie Hansen, Neal Hellman, and Stephen Kessler; poetry by Carolyn Burke, Farnaz Fatemi, Gary Young, Buzz Anderson, Anna Citrino, Arthur Streshly, and Amber Coverdale Sumral; fiction by Clifford Henderson, Micah Perks, Paul Skenazy, Elizabeth McKenzie and Paula Mahoney, an interview with Karen Tei Yamashita, a monologue by Wilma Marcus Chandler, and "Love Letters Project," in which nine Santa Cruz authors participated in The Love Letters Project held at The Museum of Art and History (MAH), Bookshop Santa Cruz, and Felix Kulpa Gallery. Each writer was asked to contribute a poem or letter they had written for someone or something they love. Contributors include Wallace Baine, Lauren Crux, Stephanie Golino, Neal Hellman, Cheyenne Street Houck, Erin Johnson, Wincy Lui, Elizabeth McKenzie, and Alyssa Young.

Those wishing to submit can go to phren-Z’s Submit page. A link to Submittable will guide writers through the process.

Additionally, phren-Z is interested in exploring where and how writing intersects with other creative disciplines. The editors seek out events, performances, exhibitions, etc., that offer opportunities for writing within a creative context.
Published April 25, 2012
THE VOLTA is a multimedia project of poetry, criticism, poetics, video, conversation (audio), and interview (text). THE VOLTA is home to the following:

Inspired by a piece of Ian Hamilton Finlay's, EVENING WILL COME is a journal of prose writing, often by poets on the how, what, and why of their writings. Founded in 2010, new issues appear on the first day of each month.

FRIDAY FEATURE presents new reviews of poetry each week.

MEDIUM is a video column and journal, where new videos of writers appear each Friday.

NEWS items of interest (e.g., new books, chapbooks, journals, reading tours, etc.).

THE PLEISTOCENE is an occasional journal of audio conversations with writers, recorded live.

Also inspired by a piece of Ian Hamilton Finlay's, THEY WILL SEW THE BLUE SAIL is a monthly journal of poetry, featuring a single poem by each of three poets per issue. New issues appear on the first of each month.

TREMOLO features a single interview with a poet, with new issues also appearing on the first day of each month.

THE VOLTA was founded in Tucson, Arizona on December 11, 2011 by Sara Renee Marshall and Joshua Marie Wilkinson. It went live on Sunday January 1, 2012.

Those interested in contributing to THE VOLTA are welcome to contact the editors.
Published April 23, 2012
Birdfeast Magazine is a new online quarterly of poetry edited by Jessica Poli. Poli says she started Birdfeast Magazine because "online magazines are making poetry more accessible than ever, and we wanted to take an active part in this. Our mission is to make available the best poetry from both emerging and established writers."

As such, Birdfeast Magazine offers readers "an eclectic mix of poetry that will make your heart beat a little faster."

The first two issues features works by Michael Mlekoday, Emma Aylor, Noah Falck, Jake Syersak, Julie Platt, Drew Kalbach, Michelle Disler, Michael Cherry, J. Scott Brownlee, Anhvu Buchanan, David Greenspan, Gregory Sherl, Eszter Takacs, Andrew Terhune, Nathan Blake, Sarah Sloat, Doug Paul Case, and Shannon Hozinec.

Poli says that in addition to continuing the online quarterly, there are ideas for contests in the future, as well as the possibility of incorporating a print aspect to the magazine.

Submissions are accepted through email, and are open year-round. Full submission guidelines can be found at the Birdfeast Magazine website.
Published April 16, 2012
Gambling the Aisle is a biannual (summer and winter) of fiction, poetry and artwork made available on the web and in PDF.

Editors Patrick Kelling (Fiction), Adam Van Alstyne (Poetry), John Cross (Visual Art) share that they started Gambling the Aisle "because we wanted to provide a space in which writers and artists could express non-cannological work. We believe the terms of art should be dictated by expression of the real, rather than the pursuit of a paycheck. We abhor the factory-produced kitsch designed to empty wallets and suffocate the rebel soul. Instead, we delight in creativity that comes on like a panic attack and illuminates an ill-defined recess."

Based on this premise, Kelling says that readers will find "some of the visual and language-based work we publish works to exist outside of the traditional literary cannon. Some excels within the this cannon. Hopefully the reader will find it all to be visceral." The publication also features a visual artist each issue by including both an interview and collection of their work.

Editors of Gambling the Aisle buck genre confinement by identifying contributions only as "Word" or "Image." Thus, the inaugural issue features Words by Michael Rosenbaum, A. Kilgore, Alla Vilnyanskaya, Matthew Overstreet, Andrew West, Roy Buck, Judith Roney, Cherie Greene, Gina Wohlsdorf, Aimee Campbell, Katherine Brennan, Dorisa Costello, Heather Elliott, Jessica Hagemann, Jordan Antonucci, Kat Stromquist, Kristina Morgan, Mar
Published April 12, 2012
The most recent issue of NANO Fiction (v5 n1) features the winner and finalists of the 2011 NANO Prize:

Winner
Sarah E. Harris, "The Kitchen"

Finalists
Lauren Hall, "Trickster"
Kevin O'Cuinn, "Shore Leave"
Erica Olsen, "Ing and Ing"
Published April 11, 2012
Editor Ariana D. Den Bleyker is the driving force behind Emerge Literary Journal, a publication of poetry available quarterly online and biannually in print. Each issue features all new poetry, with the print issues showcasing the “best” material accepted throughout the preceding reading period. Copies of the print issue will be made available through Lulu.

Emerge is aptly named, as Bleyker notes the publication is "dedicated to emerging poets and their words. We aim to publish poets who are currently emerging on the literary scene. We recognize how hard it can be to get those first few publishing credits and hope to be a foundation for the poets seeking to be published here."

As such, Bleyker offers readers "outstanding, fresh writing from some never before published voices and other emerging writers that may have some publications under their belt with a few established writers sprinkled in between."

Having just released the second issue, contributors include Kevin Ridgeway, Jennifer Schmitz, Cameron LaFlam, Bryony Noble, Coop Lee, Simon Rhee, Samantha Duncan, Stephen Byrne, Josh Crummer, Robert Cantrell, Zachariah Middleton, Christina Murphy, Nels Hanson, Chloe Clark, Sara Krasnostein, Craig Getz, Athena Dixon, Cody Jensen, Dan Nowak, Steven Myers-Yawnick, Anthony Frame, Jodie Oakes, Aftab Shaikh, Thomas Stevenson, Jordan Taylor, Kyrie Amos, Ricky Garni, SK Iyer, Michelle Hartman, Ann Howells, Vishnu Rajamanickam, Don Illich, Allie Marini Batts, Ruth Quinlin, Danna Hobart, John Kazlauskas, Taylor Pangman, Sarah O'Toole, and James Piatt.

Emerge Literary Journal currently accepts poetry, with a preference for free verse: "words with passion, voice, and place. We look for images that linger, that we can take with us to bed at night, ideas used in magnificent ways. Bring us your castles." All submissions are accepted through Submittable only, and guidelines can be found on the publication's website.

Bleyker plans to open the publication up to flash fiction (up to 750 words) by the next reading period, with a limit of four stories per issue.
Published April 10, 2012
The Bad Version is a new print, digital and online quarterly of fiction, poetry, and "essays of the young and curious."

The Editors of The Bad Version are Sanders I. Bernstein, Pat Chesnut, Mark Chiusano, Christian Flow, Daniel Howell, Teddy Martin, Kevin Seitz, James Somers, Daniel Wenger, and Esther Yi, with Art Director Trevor Martin and Staff Illustrator Sally Scopa.

Editor Teddy Martin explains the unique approach behind this new venture: "Launched in November 2011, The Bad Version is a new take on the literary-cultural magazine. Its name comes from the collaborative art of screenwriting, where the first attempt at a scene, that wild idea that gets the process going, is called a 'bad version.' Likewise, this magazine is dedicated to beginnings: to pieces that are taking risks, trying to broach new ideas, experimenting with new forms, starting new conversations. With each piece — fiction, poetry, or essay — followed by a short response that offers an alternate perspective on the subject at hand, The Bad Version’s novel structure immediately immerses the reader in an active dialogue, which continues on the publication's website."

Inside The Bad Version, readers can expect to find "thought-provoking essays on a range of topics pertaining to young life in America today; engaging short stories by up-and-coming young writers; and heart-stopping poetry — along with responses, by editors, contributors, and readers, to these pieces." Visitors to the publication's will find ongoing response threads to pieces, as well as a blog, which features "original content and innovative thinking."

As for the future of The Bad Version, Martin says, "Since publication is all about conversation and expanding what a literary magazine can be, we have always thought of our project as encompassing much more than simply publishing our quarterly journal. In the next year, we plan to expand our community and hold regular collaborative artistic events in the NYC area, where artists and non-artists can come together and share ideas, respond to each other, and generally make things better. We are also committed to education, and will be rolling out our educational initiative in the fall, in the NYC area - furthering our goal of getting people excited about the lifelong practice of writing and sharing ideas with each other."

The Bad Version accepts submissions of poetry and fiction, and looks for essay proposals for non-fiction content. All submissions are accepted by email. See the website for further details.
Published April 09, 2012
Vine Leaves Literary Journal is a quarterly online (PDF, Scribid) and print annual of vignette prose, poem, script, and art/photography.

Editors Jessica Bell and Dawn Ius started Vine Leaves after looking at the literary landscape:

The world of literature nowadays is so diverse, open-minded and thriving in experimental works, that there doesn’t seem to be any single form of written art missing from it ... you would think. But there is.

The vignette.

It’s rare for a literary magazine to accept the "vignette" as a publishable piece of literature. Why? Because it is not a “proper story.” We beg to differ.

So, what is a vignette?

"Vignette" is a word that originally meant "something that may be written on a vine-leaf." It’s a snapshot in words. It differs from flash fiction or a short story in that its aim doesn’t lie within the traditional realms of structure or plot. Instead, the vignette focuses on one element, mood, character, setting or object. It's descriptive, excellent for character or theme exploration and wordplay. Through a vignette, you create an atmosphere.

Vine Leaves, will entwine you in atmosphere; wrap you in a world where literature ferments and then matures. . .


Readers of Vine Leaves can expect to experience the vignette as "bite-sized snapshots of life written in a range of genres such as literary, minimalist, experimental, slipstream, fantasy, and black comedy."

Contributors to the first issue include Adrianne Kalfopoulou, Alaine Benard, Amie McCracken, Amy Saia, Angela Felsted, Belinda Dorio, Benjamin Atherton, Ben Nardolilli, Bobbie Troy, Cath Barton, Denise Covey, Elizabeth Varadan, Eric Nguyen, Frank Sloan, Gale Acuff, Glynis Smy, H. Edgar Hix, Halli Dee Lilburn, Howie Good, Ian Anderson, Isa Lenor, J.R.McRae, Jake Uitti, Jamie Provencal, Janîce Leotti, Janice Phelps Williams, Jim Murdoch, Kevin Ridgeway, Kyle Hemmings, Kyle W. Kerr, Laurel Garver, Linda Cassidy Lewis, Madeline Sharples, Mallory Peak, Mark Van Aken Williams, Matthew MacNish, Melissa Sarno, Michael Keenan, Michael Neal Morris, Michelle Davidson Argyle, Michelle Kennedy, Nicole Ducleroir, Patricia Ranzoni, Richard Merrill, Rick Hartwell, Salena Casha, Sheri Larsen, Stephen Parrish, Tamim Sadikali, Tiggy Johnson, Valentina Cano, Vicky Ellis, and William Haas.

In addition to putting out a print "best of" annual and planning writing contests, Editors Bell and Ius are currently in the process of applying for grants with the hope to pay writers for their work.

Vine Leaves is open for submissions of prose, poetry and script with preference in genres of literary, mainstream, speculative, and slipstream. "We will, however," says Bell, "accept all genres except erotica. We seek to make the feel of every issue completely different, so don't rely on the content of previous issues to decide what to submit. Just submit your best work. Write something brilliant and woo us into publishing it!" Artwork or photography will be considered for the cover and/or interior of each issue. See the publication website for specific details.
Published April 04, 2012
Based out of Portland, Oregon, The Conium Review is a biannual print journal of fiction and poetry published by Conium Press.

Editors James R. Gapinski, Uma Sankaram, Tristan Beach, and Susan Lynch shared their view of the publication: "The Conium Review publishes fringe literature, both in subject and style. Issues of The Conium Review vary in length, because we don’t use quotas — we simply select the best writing from the submission queue, and we find a place for it. We try to avoid preconceived ideas of genre, contemporary style, or publishable word count. We are a highly selective journal, but our final choices are based on literary craft. In other words, our goal is to publish a high-quality journal with an eclectic range of authorial voices."

Readers of The Conium Review can expect a well-balanced publication. "We try to include a wide range of well-crafted literary pieces from unique perspectives. Published works represent a variety of styles, holding reader interest and defying expectations from one story to the next."

The contributing poets and writers are Jeffrey Alfier, Jeremy Behreandt, Thor Benson, Isaac Coleman, Ross Concillo, Daniel Davis, Mason Brown DeHoog, Matthew Denvir, Ivo Drury, Howie Good, Jack Granath, Lauren Hall, Shane L. Harms, Julie Heckman, Jason L. Huskey, Paul Kavanagh, Jen Knox, Margarita Meklina, Ben Nardolilli, Edwin R. Perry, Nick Sanford, Benjamin Schachtman, Parker Tettleton, Caitlin Elizabeth Thomson, Steven Wineman, and Kirby Wright. The cover art is by Emma Cook.

Looking into the future, the editors hope "to extend our reach into the Portland community and elsewhere. Our podcast and online reviews help us stay connected with the broader literary community, but we want to expand these efforts with readings, workshops, and other special events."

Submission information can be found here.
Published April 03, 2012
From the Depths is a quarterly (March, June, September, December) of fiction, poetry, prose poetry, creative nonfiction published by Haunted Waters Press. The magazine is available as an online digital, PDF download, and in print.

Editors Susan Warren Utley and Savannah Ren
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