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Published June 13, 2012
Available online quarterly, Devilfish Review publishes fiction and flash fiction, with a preference for literary science fiction and fantasy.

When asked about their motivation for starting up a new literary magazine, Editors Sarah McDonald and Cathy Lopez comment, “It's a bit daunting to think of why to start a new publication. There are plenty of places out there where we could go to read stories we like. But we wondered, what were we missing? What if there were stories out there that we would love that weren't being published? That just wouldn't do. We prefer to take science fiction, fantasy, and things of the odd persuasion, because these are the sorts of stories that entertain us. In turn, readers can expect well-written entertaining stories that will stick with them long after reading.”


Contributors in the first issue include Amber Burke, Julie Wakeman-Linn, Katherine Horrigan, Kimberly Prijatel, Alonzo Tillison, Kenneth Poyner, Adrienne Clarke, Jessica Hagemann, Jason Newport, and Christopher Woods.

Going forward, McDonald says, “Our short term goal is to grow to a monthly publication. Our longer term goal is to be in a place where we can pay our contributors, because we would be literally nothing without them. Ultimately, Devilfish Review hopes to grow into Devilfish Press and expand into book publishing.“

Devilfish Review is currently looking for fiction and flash fiction with submissions accepted via Submittable.
Published June 12, 2012
According to Editor Joanne Cavanaugh Simpson, 3QR: The Three Quarter Review publishes “Poetry & Prose > 75 Percent True” as well as photography, video, and audio “that tells stories with a twist.”

This new literary annual is available online and in the future will be made available in paper copies. 3QR News also offers a literary blog that features their writers’ ongoing work as well as issues related to genre-crossover writing.

Simpson tells me that “3QR: The Three Quarter Review is a unique literary project and online journal featuring the mostly true work of such writers as Stephen Dixon, Jessica Anya Blau, Marilyn L. Taylor, and others. The inaugural issue offers poetry, essays, and prose pieces that are at least three-quarters fact. Our writers stretch out, capturing the essence of realist writing without the censorship of categories (Is it fiction? Is it nonfiction? What is truth?). There’s no betrayal for readers, who are often left wondering about the infallibility of memory or observation; or, in fiction, whether some things ‘really happened.’ 3QR instead creates a Fifth Genre: The Three Quarter True Story. Readers can expect to find compelling essays, stories, memoir, and poetry that capture the essence of truth in storytelling.”

Contributors to the first issues include Stephen Dixon, Jessica Anya Blau, Marilyn L. Taylor, Edward Perlman, Charles Talkoff, B.J. Hollars, Philip Sultz, Dario DiBattista, Ann Eichler Kolakowski, Jennifer Holden Ward, and Brandi Dawn Henderson.

Future plans for 3QR: The Three Quarter Review include adding digital storytelling features, including photo essays, video, and music. Updates on 3QR News will include a listing of readings, panel discussions, and other live events related to the journal and theme.

3QR is now accepting submissions for their Winter issue via traditional mail only (though editors communicate electronically once a piece is accepted). Remember: Submissions must be at least 75 percent true.
Published June 11, 2012
Edited by Christine Gosnay and Ruben Quesada, The Cossack Review is a tri-annual publication of new fiction, poetry, original translations, creative nonfiction, essays, photography, illustrative art, and reviews. The Cossack Review can be read online (PDF, Kindle) or in print as of Issue 2 (due out October 1) with additional online content.

Gosnay explains that the name of the publication is a historical reference: “The appearance of Cossacks – Slavic peoples, often mounted on horseback, militaristic, proud, flawed, and complicated – in Russian literature has always fascinated me. Their appearance as confounding, almost mythic characters who ride in, seize, disturb, take note, and then return to their land was explored by Gogol, Tolstoy, Pushkin, Tsvetaeva and many other writers. Naming the journal The Cossack Review is a nod to the quality of power, troubled mythos, unsettling beauty, and quest for understanding that great writing imparts to its readers.”

With such a strong historical connection to literature, Gosnay says she started The Cossack Review as a way to continue this tradition: “As a reader of literary journals and magazines who has often known the unique joy of discovering a poem or short story that reveals something I never knew about the world, I wanted to build a journal that could focus on just that – showcasing exceptional new writing that delights, and that uncovers truths about our shared experience. Issue 1 showcases beautiful, surprising poetry and fiction that is rich with imagery, pathos, humor, and psychological understanding. Stories that you wouldn’t believe, that make you read twice. Nonfiction that understands you, that can relate and teach, and is enhanced by stunning photography to accompany the writing.”

The inaugural issue of The Cossack Review features poetry by Paul David Adkins, Maureen Alsop, Jacob Cribbs, Adam Crittenden, Oliver de la Paz, William Doreski, Teneice Durrant Delgado, Brian Gatz, Anne Haines, T.R. Hummer, Russell Jaffe, Lindsey Lewis Smithson, Linda Martin, Charles McCrory, Kristina Moriconi, John Palen, John Phillips, Tim Suermondt, José-Flore Tappy, and Eric M.R. Webb; fiction by Soren Gauger, Kimberly Hatfield, Bryan Jones, Olive Mullet, Patty Somlo, and David Swykert; and nonfiction by Robert Boucheron, Valery Petrovskiy, Phillip Polefrone, and Apryl Sniffen.

Gosnay and Quesada have great plans for the journal, which will go into print on October 1, 2012 with the launch of Issue 2. It will be featured in bookstores around the San Francisco Bay Area and beyond. On off-months, they will be featuring an online supplement. The Cossack Review staff is also looking forward to attending the AWP 2013 Conference in Boston and starting a reading series as well in the new year.

Submissions are accepted year-round for print editions of the journal as well as the online supplements. The editors encourage you to send in your best unpublished poetry, fiction, and nonfiction via Submittable. Simultaneous submissions are welcome.

The Cossack Review is also looking to bring on a fiction editor soon and welcomes inquiries if you are interested in becoming a submissions reader for their journal.
Published June 05, 2012
Educe Journal is an online quarterly of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and hybrid/visual artist showcase. Edited by Matthew R. K. Haynes, Eudice Journal is available in print, PDF, ePub, and iPad reading formats.

Haynes says the motivation for publishing Educe Journal is a commitment to "showcasing visual artists and publishing innovative literary fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction by established and emerging writers from the queer community.” With “Queer = Other,” he adds.

In each issue, readers can expect to find up to 100 pages of quality fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, as well as one visual artist who dons the covers with a mid-issue spread.

Contributors to the first issue include Richard Atwood, Steven Matthew Brown, Charles Casey, Ezra Dan Feldman, Reed Hearne, TT Jax, Thomas Kearnes, Sarah Merkle, John Pluecker, Heather Stewart, Vicente Viraym, and Visual Artist Eleanor Leonne Bennett.

Haynes hopes that Educe Journal will make its mark as a continuing quarterly queer literary journal. And while he hopes Educe Journal will have more of a presence in the print community, the publication is “committed to the efficiency and environmental advantages of being an e-publication viewable on any computer and specifically slated for the Apple iPad.”

Educe Journal is looking for LITERARY fiction/nonfiction/poetry submissions from queer folk across the Globe with multicultural submissions encouraged. Educe Journal is also interested in submissions from visual artists as each issue will feature one artist, whose work will be used for the cover. The deadline for submissions is ongoing; see the publication website for more details.
Published June 04, 2012
Thrush Poetry Journal is published by Thrush Press electronically bi-monthly (Jan, Mar, May, Jul, Sep & Nov) with a print annual “Best of.” Thrush Press also offers select poetry chapbooks and other poetry ephemera that the editors find of interest.

Founder and  Editor in Chief Helen Vitoria started Thrush Poetry Journal “to provide a place where great poets and amazing poetry are featured in an elegant, simple design, without any distractions.” She is joined in this mission by Associate Editor and Web Designer Walter Bjorkman in providing readers with “the best poetry available to us.”

Some contributors to Thrush Poetry Journal include Maureen Alsop, Hélène Cardona, Cindy Goff, Nathalie Handal, Anna Journey, Ada Limón, Rachel McKibbens, Sheila Nickerson, Amber Tamblyn, and Ocean Vuong.
Published May 30, 2012
Cactus Heart is a new PDF quarterly of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, photography, and art edited by Sara Rauch.

Rauch comments on starting Cactus Heart: “After being in publishing for six years, and a writer for at least double that time, I was inspired to create Cactus Heart as a new forum for engaging work. There are lots of great publications out there, and always more great writers looking to share their work. I wanted to create a literary magazine that felt like a community and a conversation. With all the changes going on in the publishing world, it finally felt possible for me to put together an e-literary magazine – a quality online publication filled with amazing work.”

Cactus Heart readers will be treated to “Spiny, succulent writing! They will find plenty of plot-driven, language-focused fiction, poems that blend images and thoughts seamlessly, deeply felt nonfiction, and full-color photography.”

Contributors in the first issue include Alysia Angel, Glen Armstrong, Eleanor Leonne Bennett, Christine Brandel, Stephanie Callas, Flower Conroy, Sian Cummins, erin feldman, Merlin Flower, Janet Freeman, Diana Gallagher, Christine Gosnay, William Henderson, Courtney Hill Wulsin, Jesse Kuiken, Anthony Lawrence, D Lep, Stewart Lewis, Nico Mara-McKay, Ben Nardolilli, Katrina Pallop, Carol Piva, Jules A Riley, Holly Ringland, Meegan Schreiber, Jenna Whittaker, Theresa Williams, and Christopher Woods.

Rauch hopes to add a print publication to the roster, and possibly move into book publishing as she continues her work with Cactus Heart.

Cactus Heart is currently accepting submissions for the second issue until August 1 – full guidelines are available on the publication website.
Published May 29, 2012
Published quarterly in PDF format, The Manila Envelope features poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, and art. While the full version is available only by subscription, selected works can be viewed online.

Literary Editor Cristina Querrer and Art Editor Tiana Madison started The Manila Envelope out of a desire “to present another avenue, another platform for writers and artists to publish their exquisite work.” The editors stress, “We want to offer a nurturing environment for everyone, from established or just-starting-out writers and artists. But we also adhere to our own aesthetic guidelines which can be eclectic. As we go along, read our issues, like us on Facebook, get to know us. The editors of The Manila Envelope are writers and artists too.”

Readers can expect the writing to follow a theme that runs through each issue in a variety of styles with the inaugural issue featuring poetry by Tobi Cogswell, Mark Harris, Andrew Mancuso and Mark Wisniewski; essays by S.C. Barrus, Julio Espin, Bennett Zamoff; and fiction by Stephanie Becerra, Larry Kostroff, Amy Meyerson, and Jeffrey Rubinstein.

Querrer and Madison say future plan for the publication are “to stay awhile and to perhaps be able to offer contest prizes or even a possible print anthology to even quite possibly different platforms and digital versions of our magazine.”

Submissions are accepted through Submittable on a rolling basis with accepted works published in the next available issue.
Published May 28, 2012
phren-Z is a quarterly online literary magazine published by Santa Cruz Writes. phren-Z promotes the work of writers with a connection to Santa Cruz County, California, publishing fiction, non-fiction, poetry, plays, monologues, essays, and interviews.

Editors Karen Ackland (fiction), Julia Chiapella (poetry), and Jory Post (non-fiction, plays, and monologues) started phren-Z “ to develop and sustain a vibrant literary community dedicated to the craft of writing and its ability to inform, reveal, and enchant.” As such, readers can find writing in all genres from both established and emerging writers with a connection to Santa Cruz County, California. The Floodlight section provides in depth coverage on a given topic - a specific writer, event, or other issue of significance to the local literary community.

“phren-Z is community oriented,” say the editors, “so each issue will feature a public reading of contributors work, read by the authors themselves. We also will continue to seek opportunities for writers to get their work in front of the public including, but not limited to, radio performances, community TV performances, and an annual printed edition.”

Works available for online reading include essays by Wallace Baine, Don Rothman, Karen Ackland, Sarah Albertson, Vinnie Hansen, Neal Hellman, and Stephen Kessler; poetry by Carolyn Burke, Farnaz Fatemi, Gary Young, Buzz Anderson, Anna Citrino, Arthur Streshly, and Amber Coverdale Sumral; fiction by Clifford Henderson, Micah Perks, Paul Skenazy, Elizabeth McKenzie and Paula Mahoney, an interview with Karen Tei Yamashita, a monologue by Wilma Marcus Chandler, and "Love Letters Project," in which nine Santa Cruz authors participated in The Love Letters Project held at The Museum of Art and History (MAH), Bookshop Santa Cruz, and Felix Kulpa Gallery. Each writer was asked to contribute a poem or letter they had written for someone or something they love. Contributors include Wallace Baine, Lauren Crux, Stephanie Golino, Neal Hellman, Cheyenne Street Houck, Erin Johnson, Wincy Lui, Elizabeth McKenzie, and Alyssa Young.

Those wishing to submit can go to phren-Z’s Submit page. A link to Submittable will guide writers through the process.

Additionally, phren-Z is interested in exploring where and how writing intersects with other creative disciplines. The editors seek out events, performances, exhibitions, etc., that offer opportunities for writing within a creative context.
Published April 25, 2012
THE VOLTA is a multimedia project of poetry, criticism, poetics, video, conversation (audio), and interview (text). THE VOLTA is home to the following:

Inspired by a piece of Ian Hamilton Finlay's, EVENING WILL COME is a journal of prose writing, often by poets on the how, what, and why of their writings. Founded in 2010, new issues appear on the first day of each month.

FRIDAY FEATURE presents new reviews of poetry each week.

MEDIUM is a video column and journal, where new videos of writers appear each Friday.

NEWS items of interest (e.g., new books, chapbooks, journals, reading tours, etc.).

THE PLEISTOCENE is an occasional journal of audio conversations with writers, recorded live.

Also inspired by a piece of Ian Hamilton Finlay's, THEY WILL SEW THE BLUE SAIL is a monthly journal of poetry, featuring a single poem by each of three poets per issue. New issues appear on the first of each month.

TREMOLO features a single interview with a poet, with new issues also appearing on the first day of each month.

THE VOLTA was founded in Tucson, Arizona on December 11, 2011 by Sara Renee Marshall and Joshua Marie Wilkinson. It went live on Sunday January 1, 2012.

Those interested in contributing to THE VOLTA are welcome to contact the editors.
Published April 23, 2012
Birdfeast Magazine is a new online quarterly of poetry edited by Jessica Poli. Poli says she started Birdfeast Magazine because "online magazines are making poetry more accessible than ever, and we wanted to take an active part in this. Our mission is to make available the best poetry from both emerging and established writers."

As such, Birdfeast Magazine offers readers "an eclectic mix of poetry that will make your heart beat a little faster."

The first two issues features works by Michael Mlekoday, Emma Aylor, Noah Falck, Jake Syersak, Julie Platt, Drew Kalbach, Michelle Disler, Michael Cherry, J. Scott Brownlee, Anhvu Buchanan, David Greenspan, Gregory Sherl, Eszter Takacs, Andrew Terhune, Nathan Blake, Sarah Sloat, Doug Paul Case, and Shannon Hozinec.

Poli says that in addition to continuing the online quarterly, there are ideas for contests in the future, as well as the possibility of incorporating a print aspect to the magazine.

Submissions are accepted through email, and are open year-round. Full submission guidelines can be found at the Birdfeast Magazine website.
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