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Published June 26, 2012
The Drunken Odyssey with John King: A Podcast About the Writing Life is a new weekly podcast that features interviews with established writers about the writing life. Editor John King explains that each episode will also have a memoir essay about a writer’s relationship to a beloved book. “Each episode,” he says, “will close with me responding to listener mail. All aspects of the writing life—including any possible genre—will be discussed.”

King says that the name of the podcast “invokes both the mythos of the writer as drinker, and also the mythos of the writer as heroic misadventurer. Both identities can overlap. But liquor is not the only path to drunkenness. As the late ray Bradbury said, ‘You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.’”

King says, “Writing is an isolating activity, and discussion of writing in the media prioritizes the finished product of writing. This podcast, then, is an opportunity to build a sense of community among writers, and to offer some catharsis in discussing the struggle of writing, and all aspects of this business of writing, rather than merely the accomplishments of writing.”

The first podcast includes an interview with Nathan Holic, an editor, and Ryan Rivas, a publisher, who are behind the 15 Views of Orlando project and a memoir essay from Olivia Kate Cerrone which discusses her relationship to Yann Martel’s Life of Pi. King says that future episodes will have interviews with Lisa Claire Roney, the Shakespearean actor Kevin Crawford, and novelist Darin Strauss.

King is looking for content, especially memoir essays about beloved books. He is also looking forward to responding to listener mail and encourages listeners to write to him through the contact information on the site.
Published June 25, 2012
Sawmill Magazine, a new online magazine, offers up six issues a year, two for each of the genres: fiction, poetry, and comics. Sawmill was created as a “digital sister” to Typecast Publishing’s print magazine, The Lumberyard. Fiction Editor Wesley Fairman, says, “We felt it was only fitting that we develop a name for our web-based magazine that recalled The Lumberyard and evoked similar feelings of creation, industry, and precision. We wanted a place to play, to test ideas, and to begin building relationships with writers and visual artists that, hopefully, lead to bigger projects down the road. Much in the way the sawmill is the first step for building materials before they reach the lumberyard, Sawmill the magazine is the birthplace for the future of Typecast.”

The rest of the editorial team includes Comics Editor Jake Snider and Poetry Editor Jen Woods. Fiction will be published each January and July, comics each March and September, and poetry each May and November. “With each issue,” says Fairman, “the editors will seek to forge partnerships with authors, illustrators, and graphic designers in order to present digital packaging as gorgeous and important as the literature housed within.

“When you open Sawmill, expect to see something unusual and engaging. Be it a short story wrapped in an experimental graphic design scheme, a poem that makes you choke on your breath, or a hand-drawn, one-of-a-kind comic. Never ordinary, and always pushing the boundaries of what has come before, Sawmill seeks only to find a way to delight you, and fill you with as much joy as any book you’ve ever held in your hands.”

Fairman says that Typecast Publishing enjoys working with magazines because it allows them to “work with a multitude of creative forces at one time.” She says that offering an online magazine allowed the publishing company to continue to work with magazines but in a new way. “We wanted to pose the same challenges we face in our print objects to the digital format—mainly how to bring intimacy and depth to the reading experience in a way that honors the text. And digital was exciting because it allowed us to create something we could offer for free.”

The first issue include comics from Ken Henson, Maureen Fellinger, and Megan Stanton and fiction from Kirby Gann, David James Poissant, Mark Jacobs, Kristin Matly Dennis, and Matt Dobson (Publication Design).

As the magazine develops, the editors hope to add a behind the scenes feature “where the reader can pull back the proverbial curtain and see the trials and triumphs of developing a literary magazine. Additionally,” Fairman says, “we also hope to develop a print on demand feature for readers who prefer physical copies of the literary magazines they love.”

Because there are six issues a year, submissions are accepted via email throughout most of the year.
Published June 21, 2012
Edited by Jeremy Lopez and Paul Menzer, The Hare is a peer-reviewed, on-line academic journal published three times yearly. The journal publishes short essays on the dramatic, poetic, and prose works of Shakespeare and his contemporaries. The journal also publishes academic book reviews, and provides a public forum for open exchange between scholars in the field. The Hare seeks short essays on all topics related to early modern literature - poetry, prose, and drama as well as reviews of "old" - classic, foundational, seminal, unjustly forgotten, etc. - books.


Published June 20, 2012
Glass Seed Annual is a new annual poetry magazine published each fall that specializes in pantoums. Editor Mary Alexander Agner says that readers should expect to find poetry that uses "repetition, refrain, anaphora, alliteration, rhyme, meter, and other sonic devices to convey interesting and unexpected stories."

The magazine started as a way to "showcase poetry which emphasizes the musical aspects of language without neglecting meaning," explains Agner. "Also, I wanted to promote writing and reading of pantoums."

Contributors in the first issue include Elsa Louise von Schreiber, Francesca Forrest, Joshua Davis, Sherry Chandler, and Louise Wakeling.

Agner said that the magazine will continue to solicit and publish poetry which emphasizes the music of language with a new topic for publication each year. Submissions are accepted through email, and writers whose works are selected will receive payment for publication.
Published June 19, 2012
Edited by founder Athena Dixon, Linden Avenue Literary Journal is a monthly online journal that accepts poetry (up to 50 lines), flash fiction (up to 1,000 words), and fiction (up to 2,500 words). Dixon says that readers can expect to find the best work, regardless of any affiliation or prior publication and "poetry and fiction that is as beautiful in construction as it is in content. I wanted to create a place where writers would feel comfortable in sharing their words and, in turn, themselves."

The journal was named after the street that Dixon grew up on. It was where she "first wrote her stories and poems and was encouraged to continue writing by the teachers in her local elementary school and junior high school." Dixon explains that that she has created this journal as a space for stories that are both simple and stunning. "I found myself a little disheartened by work that seemed 'alternative' for the sake of being alternative, not because the content supported it," she says.

The first issue features poetry and fiction by Elizabeth Akin Stelling, Leesa Cross-Smith, Ariana D. Den Bleyker, Daniel Casey, Andrea Blythe, Melanie Faith, Fiona Pearse, Marissa Hyde, Anthony Frame, Alisha Sommer, Gwen Henderson, C.L. McFadyen, William Henderson, Laura Hallman, Neal Kitterlin, and Val Dering Rojas.

The journal will continue to publish each month with a goal of being able to accept art and photography by the end of 2012. Within the next year, Dixon hopes to move the journal to a print publication.

Currently, submissions are accepted through Submittable on a rolling basis for issues published on the first of every month. Simultaneous submissions are welcome.
Published June 18, 2012
Glassworks is an ecclectic biannual of writing: poetry, fiction, nonfiction, interviews, craft essays, and new media: photography, paintings, photo essays, graphic fiction, video, audio (spoken; no music), and animations. Is that all? “Surprise us!” say the editors.

Available in print, with a digital new-media issue, and eZine, the December issue of Glassworks is a “regular” issue with May offering themed content.

Managing Editor Manda Frederick and Editor in Chief Ron Block started Glassworks as part of Rowan University's Master in Writing Arts Graduate Program. “For a graduate program,” Frederick says, “it is important to have a literary journal to provide professional development for students and to supplement the purpose and quality of a program.”

In support of this mission, readers of Glassworks can expect to find variety of “current and interesting new-media content rarely published in other online journals, smart writing about craft, and a variety of poetry and prose from writers all over the globe. Moreover,” Frederick tells me, “our magazine's aesthetic is built on the tenor and metaphor of the glass working industry (we are located in Glassboro, NJ, which was established as a glass working town). We value an attention to craft and aesthetic beauty.“

Glassworks first full issue, Spring 2012, features works by Robert Wrigley, Oliver de la Paz, Suzanne Paola, James Grabill, Andrew Lam, and more.

As for the future of the publication, the editors comment: “Next year is an exciting year for us. We will publish a general print issue, a digital new-media issue, and a themed issue (next year's theme: utility and beauty). We are also going to publish an ‘apprentice’ issue that will be created out of community outreach, getting writing from our immediate community. You'll also see us debut our magazine at AWP in Boston 2013. Moreover, Glassworks will, for the first time, be a graduate class. So the graduate students will be hard at work creating additional content for the magazine including interviews, blogs, and more."

Glassworks is currently open for submissions with full information found on the publication's website.
Published June 15, 2012
The Boiler Journal is a new online quarterly of poetry, fiction and nonfiction edited by Sebastian Paramo, William Derks, Carly Susser, Sarah Levine, and Caitlin Bahrey whose goal in starting a new literary magazine is "to promote unheard voices." They hope to provide their readers with "quality literature of stuff you've never heard of before."

The first issue of The Boiler Journal features works by Jessica Ankeny, G. Taylor Davis, Adam Chambers, Kevin Pilkington, Sophia Starmack, Justine Haus, and Jean Kim.

Editors say future plans for The Boiler Journal are to publish an annual best-of chapbook each year and continue growing from there.
Published June 13, 2012
Available online quarterly, Devilfish Review publishes fiction and flash fiction, with a preference for literary science fiction and fantasy.

When asked about their motivation for starting up a new literary magazine, Editors Sarah McDonald and Cathy Lopez comment, “It's a bit daunting to think of why to start a new publication. There are plenty of places out there where we could go to read stories we like. But we wondered, what were we missing? What if there were stories out there that we would love that weren't being published? That just wouldn't do. We prefer to take science fiction, fantasy, and things of the odd persuasion, because these are the sorts of stories that entertain us. In turn, readers can expect well-written entertaining stories that will stick with them long after reading.”


Contributors in the first issue include Amber Burke, Julie Wakeman-Linn, Katherine Horrigan, Kimberly Prijatel, Alonzo Tillison, Kenneth Poyner, Adrienne Clarke, Jessica Hagemann, Jason Newport, and Christopher Woods.

Going forward, McDonald says, “Our short term goal is to grow to a monthly publication. Our longer term goal is to be in a place where we can pay our contributors, because we would be literally nothing without them. Ultimately, Devilfish Review hopes to grow into Devilfish Press and expand into book publishing.“

Devilfish Review is currently looking for fiction and flash fiction with submissions accepted via Submittable.
Published June 12, 2012
According to Editor Joanne Cavanaugh Simpson, 3QR: The Three Quarter Review publishes “Poetry & Prose > 75 Percent True” as well as photography, video, and audio “that tells stories with a twist.”

This new literary annual is available online and in the future will be made available in paper copies. 3QR News also offers a literary blog that features their writers’ ongoing work as well as issues related to genre-crossover writing.

Simpson tells me that “3QR: The Three Quarter Review is a unique literary project and online journal featuring the mostly true work of such writers as Stephen Dixon, Jessica Anya Blau, Marilyn L. Taylor, and others. The inaugural issue offers poetry, essays, and prose pieces that are at least three-quarters fact. Our writers stretch out, capturing the essence of realist writing without the censorship of categories (Is it fiction? Is it nonfiction? What is truth?). There’s no betrayal for readers, who are often left wondering about the infallibility of memory or observation; or, in fiction, whether some things ‘really happened.’ 3QR instead creates a Fifth Genre: The Three Quarter True Story. Readers can expect to find compelling essays, stories, memoir, and poetry that capture the essence of truth in storytelling.”

Contributors to the first issues include Stephen Dixon, Jessica Anya Blau, Marilyn L. Taylor, Edward Perlman, Charles Talkoff, B.J. Hollars, Philip Sultz, Dario DiBattista, Ann Eichler Kolakowski, Jennifer Holden Ward, and Brandi Dawn Henderson.

Future plans for 3QR: The Three Quarter Review include adding digital storytelling features, including photo essays, video, and music. Updates on 3QR News will include a listing of readings, panel discussions, and other live events related to the journal and theme.

3QR is now accepting submissions for their Winter issue via traditional mail only (though editors communicate electronically once a piece is accepted). Remember: Submissions must be at least 75 percent true.
Published June 11, 2012
Edited by Christine Gosnay and Ruben Quesada, The Cossack Review is a tri-annual publication of new fiction, poetry, original translations, creative nonfiction, essays, photography, illustrative art, and reviews. The Cossack Review can be read online (PDF, Kindle) or in print as of Issue 2 (due out October 1) with additional online content.

Gosnay explains that the name of the publication is a historical reference: “The appearance of Cossacks – Slavic peoples, often mounted on horseback, militaristic, proud, flawed, and complicated – in Russian literature has always fascinated me. Their appearance as confounding, almost mythic characters who ride in, seize, disturb, take note, and then return to their land was explored by Gogol, Tolstoy, Pushkin, Tsvetaeva and many other writers. Naming the journal The Cossack Review is a nod to the quality of power, troubled mythos, unsettling beauty, and quest for understanding that great writing imparts to its readers.”

With such a strong historical connection to literature, Gosnay says she started The Cossack Review as a way to continue this tradition: “As a reader of literary journals and magazines who has often known the unique joy of discovering a poem or short story that reveals something I never knew about the world, I wanted to build a journal that could focus on just that – showcasing exceptional new writing that delights, and that uncovers truths about our shared experience. Issue 1 showcases beautiful, surprising poetry and fiction that is rich with imagery, pathos, humor, and psychological understanding. Stories that you wouldn’t believe, that make you read twice. Nonfiction that understands you, that can relate and teach, and is enhanced by stunning photography to accompany the writing.”

The inaugural issue of The Cossack Review features poetry by Paul David Adkins, Maureen Alsop, Jacob Cribbs, Adam Crittenden, Oliver de la Paz, William Doreski, Teneice Durrant Delgado, Brian Gatz, Anne Haines, T.R. Hummer, Russell Jaffe, Lindsey Lewis Smithson, Linda Martin, Charles McCrory, Kristina Moriconi, John Palen, John Phillips, Tim Suermondt, José-Flore Tappy, and Eric M.R. Webb; fiction by Soren Gauger, Kimberly Hatfield, Bryan Jones, Olive Mullet, Patty Somlo, and David Swykert; and nonfiction by Robert Boucheron, Valery Petrovskiy, Phillip Polefrone, and Apryl Sniffen.

Gosnay and Quesada have great plans for the journal, which will go into print on October 1, 2012 with the launch of Issue 2. It will be featured in bookstores around the San Francisco Bay Area and beyond. On off-months, they will be featuring an online supplement. The Cossack Review staff is also looking forward to attending the AWP 2013 Conference in Boston and starting a reading series as well in the new year.

Submissions are accepted year-round for print editions of the journal as well as the online supplements. The editors encourage you to send in your best unpublished poetry, fiction, and nonfiction via Submittable. Simultaneous submissions are welcome.

The Cossack Review is also looking to bring on a fiction editor soon and welcomes inquiries if you are interested in becoming a submissions reader for their journal.
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