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Published January 28, 2013
ARDOR Literary Magazine is a new triannual digital magazine the publishes short fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, and short-shorts alongside visual art. Founding and Managing Editor Joseph Hessert says that he launched ARDOR “to fill a niche in the market—offering writers a rapid turn-around time on their submissions and the guarantee of payment for accepted work.” He is very interested in making sure that each writer gets the attention they deserving; he reads each submission through twice so that mood of an editor on a particular day does not sway the decision. “At present I'm the only one reading submissions,” he says, “and despite this fact I managed to respond to over 90% of the work submitted during our first reading period within two weeks, writing many personal replies and notes of thanks to the writers and artists who sent their work to ARDOR.”

Hessert explains the name of the magazine as such: “ARDOR is defined as "a great warmth of feeling; fervor or passion" and can alternatively be defined as "an intense devotion or eagerness." This word seemed a fitting name for our publication as all meaningful writing stands as an example of a writer's burning passion —his or her need to offer a unique vision of the world. As a literary magazine this is the type of work we strive to find, feature and promote: writing that matters.”

Currently, ARDOR can be read online in a digital publishing format that creates links through the magazine and on mobile devices (offers the option of a convenient text-only reading option to eliminate the need to zoom). Hessert says that in the future, they may offer a print version of the digital copy.

Each issue of the magazine features one prose writer and one poet. Personal interviews are included with both authors. “This interview with the writer offers readers additional insight and (we hope) deepens their enjoyment of and engagement with the featured pieces in the magazine,” says Hessert. “These interviews close with craft-advice for new writers and we think this is a nice tribute to our featured writers and a nice thing to offer our readers (many of our readers are writers after all).”

Already, ARDOR is increasing its reputation, first with a short story contest that will offer writers at $500 prize as well as an interview and publication in Issue 3. Veteran story writer Chris Offutt will be the guest judge. In the future, Hessert says he hopes to offer more contests and increase the pay the writers receive. “My hope is that as more people become aware of ARDOR word will get out that we're a professional independent publication that values and respects writers and consistently offers readers stories, essays and poems which matter,” Hessert explains.

Issue One includes fiction by Meagan Cass and Andrew Dutton (our featured prose writer), nonfiction by Heather Price-Wright, Anastasia Selby and Sean Finucane Toner, poetry by Phillip Barron, Ellen Wade Beals, John S. Blake, Nancy Dobson, Nidhi Zakaria Eipe, Howie Good, Peter McNamara (our featured poet), Laurelyn Whitt and David Zaza and artwork by Eleanor Leonne Bennett, Rachel Carbonell, Ines Franco Fatzinger, MJ Forster (cover artist) and Ann Tracy.

ARDOR is open to submissions year-round, and the open reading period of the Short Story Contest goes until the end of March 2013. Guidelines for both can be viewed on ARDOR’s website.

For a review of ARDOR on Screen Reading, click here.
Published December 10, 2012
NewPages is happy to welcome yet another new, online magazine—The Golden Key. Publishing fiction and poetry twice a year, the magazines is available online and in PDF form for free. The magazine publishes speculative and literary writing, stories and poems that “grip,” “enchant,” and “enthrall” the editors.

The name of the magazine is inspired by the Grimm's fairy tale by the same name. Co-Editor Susan Anspach says that the story “concludes with a boy lifting the lid of a little iron chest before revealing to readers what the chest contains. The Grimms,” she continues, “chose to end their collection of fairy tales with this story as a reminder that there exists an endless reserve of stories still yet untold. In the same spirit, our journal seeks to publish work that is open to strange and marvelous possibilities.”

During her MFA program at University of Maryland, Anspach met Co-Editors Carlea Holl-Jensen and LiAnn Yim. They were all reading a lot of speculative and strange work. “We were excited to share our fascination with the weird and the oft magical, and we knew we wanted more of it,” Anspach says. Thus, the magazine was born.

But compared to some other online magazines, this magazine will remain digital. The editors don’t have hopes of eventually turning it to a print publication because they wish to make “the best digital imprint [they] can.” Anspach says that this will help keep the costs low so that they can eventually pay their contributors.

The poems in the first issue include "Let's Hurt" by Cat Richardson, "My Son to His Therapist:" and "Daughters of the Spindle" by Mary Elzabeth Lee, "Song of Solomon" by Maya K Lowy, "You tell me" by M.S. Rooney, and "dream, tiger" by Nancy Chen Long. The fiction includes "Bones" by Sylvia Linsteadt, "Fetching Whiskey Bill" by Lily Bruzas, "The Wooden Frame" by Alexander Gifford Howard, "Trail of Stones" by Adam Smith, and "Duplicator" by James D. Reed.

Every issue of the magazine is themed. The magazine accepts submissions via email starting Jan. 1 and running through March 31 for the next issue. You can follow The Golden Key on Facebook and Twitter (@GoldenKeyLit) for announcements on submissions, issue themes, and release dates.
Published December 03, 2012
We are happy to welcome the museum of americana to our guide to literary magazines. Born from the desire to “revive and repurpose our cultural heritage” and pass it on to the next generation, the magazine publishes nonfiction, fiction, poetry, reviews, interviews, photography, and artwork. Editor Justin Hamm says that this quarterly online magazine's name contains the word “museum” because it is what they’d like to accomplish. “One of the best parts of a museum experience is the juxtaposition,“ he says. “Dozens of periods exist under the same roof, which can create a pretty interesting mixture. We want our readers to have that kind of experience with each issue, to move from, say, Thomas Jefferson to Doo-Wop in one mouse click. At the same time, ‘museum’ is not meant to imply ‘retired’ artifacts under glass. We're especially interested in work that makes Americana new, that experiments with or repurposes it in unexpected ways.”

Hamm says that beyond excellent reading and art, you can expect to experience “something akin to running into an old high school friend after twenty years, a simultaneous mixture of familiarity and foreignness.” Hamm says that the editors woud like to restore the cultural heritage’s vitality by “publishing work that uses the old as construction material for something new. Americans are down in a lot ways right now. We're divided. Now seems like a good time to revisit our shared past.”

The first issue of the museum of americana includes poetry from Tony Barnstone, Scott Beal, Jenn Blair, Jeff Kass, Kathleen Kirk, Norbert Krapf, Christopher Martin, Kevin Millar, Dale Patterson, Pepper Trail, David Walsh, and Karen Weyant; fiction by Sean Conaway, Joyce Goldenstern, Paul Jaskunas, and Dan Mancilla; and nonfiction by Chelsey Clammer.

In the near future, the editors hope to add music and short films to the website as well as develop a team of regular reviewers to “spotlight Americana-themed books.” Eventually, they would like to become a print publication, perhaps even publishing some chapbooks and books.

Other editors include Poetry Editors Karrie Waarala and Tim Hunt, Prose Editors Lauren Alwan and Lindsey Griffin, and Photography/Art Editor Jennifer Joy Jameson.

The next reading period is the month of December. Submissions can be sent via email with full guidelines on their website. “We hope you’ll add submitting to us to your holiday to-do lists,” Hamm says.
Published November 28, 2012
Peer edited and drawing on an editorial presence that includes students from the Centre for American Studies, the Centre for the Study of Theory and Criticism, Modern Languages and Literatures, Comparative Literature, Women’s Studies & Feminist Research, and the Department of English, Word Hoard is a new community journal supported by Western University's Graduate English Society.

Word Hoard is currently soliciting articles, essays, and interviews for their second issue. They invite submissions between 3000-5000 words related to the provocation and concept of “The Unrecyclable.” Article and interview submissions are due 15 January, 2013. Accepted submissions can expect online and print publication in the summer of 2013.


Current Issue: Volume 1, Issue 1 (2012)
Community and Dissent


Articles available full-text (PDF) online:

Editors' Introduction: Leif Schenstead-Harris, Nina Budabin McQuown, and Kevin Godbout

“Prometheus Queer: An Interview With Daniel Allen Cox” by Matthew Halse and Dock Currie

“The Progeny of Prometheus: Solidarity as Gift” by Mary Eileen Wennekers

“Identity, Memory and Place” by Kelly Baker

“Queer Spaces and Strategic Social Constructions in Rao’s The Boyfriend” by Frederick D. King

“Embracing Identity Politics as a Way of Dealing with a Self in Crisis in Edmund White’s The Married Man” by Zied Khemakhem

“Nationalism, Community, Literature” by Christopher Langlois

“Leadership, Authenticity, and the Arendtian World” by Rita A. Gardiner

“Leadership and Pedagogy in the Arts and Humanities: An Interview with Alison Conway and Joel Faflak” by Diana Samu-Visser and Nina Budabin McQuown

“Patricia Grace’s Potiki: A Case Study for the Adaptability of Postcolonial Theory to Indigenous Literature” by Karim Abuawad

“Publishing and Reading as Dissent: Resistance, Literary Tourism and Arsenal Pulp Press” by Casey Stepaniuk

“1984, Genesis Upside Down” by Jamie Rooney

“A Walking Tour of Light” by Leif Schenstead-Harris

“’& Then’: Word Hoard’s Closing Remarks” by Leif Schenstead-Harris, Nina Budabin McQuown, and Kevin Godbout
Published November 14, 2012
"What if a phoenix were to ignite in a Jacuzzi? Would anyone notice? Would the phoenix be reborn?" These are the questions that Editor Nicholas Wilsey asks. “I like to think the phoenix would reenter the world in a state of relaxation: a cool drink in its beak; a warm, bubbly feeling climbing up its wings,” he says. And thus, the name of his new literary magazine was born.

Phoenix in the Jacuzzi Journal is a print magazine that publishes at least twice a year in the spring in the fall. There is a possibility of having multiple issues in the spring and fall or a special issue in the winter and summer. They publish poems and short prose pieces.

“I am beginning to talk with other journals about doing a joint reading on the poetry-focused radio show I DJ, The Eggshell Parade,” Wilsey says. “I also intend to do an issue that includes a CD of musical adaptations of the issue’s pieces. I am going to have a lot of fun with PJJ. I invite readers and contributors to have a lof of fun with PJJ, Joe (Weil, Consigliere), and me.”

The inaugural issue features new writing from Grace Bauer, Adam Fitzgerald, Howie Good, Michael Homolka, Paul Hostovsky, Bridget Lowe, Andrew Nurkin, K.M.A. Sullivan, and Anne Valente.

PJJ accepts submissions through email. Authors whose work is accepted are invited to read on The Eggshell Parade.
Published November 13, 2012
Sundog Lit is a brand new online magazine (which I recently reviewed on Screen Reading) that quarterly publishes literary fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, and hybrid works as well as occasional video, photography, and art. “We started this magazine because we were tired of quiet lit, stories where nothing happens and people stand around, idle, wondering about life instead of living it,” says Managing/Founding Editor Justin Lawrence Daugherty. “Our mission is to publish literature that scorches the earth. We don’t want quiet. We want it loud and incendiary.”

The name comes from an atmospheric phenomenon in which bright spots of light appear in the sky near the sun, sometimes making it seem as if the sun were wearing a halo. Daugherty says that this dual-sun image was perfect to describe their magazine, one in which was about both serious literature and about being “active, destructive, generating, and explosive.”

The editors aim to leave an imprint on their readers, allowing the literature to stick with them even after the internet browser is closed. Daugherty also expresses that readers will find a community of writers. “We promote work through our Friday Rex series, book-promotions such as in our current Texts Inspired by Robert Kloss' The Alligators of Abraham series.” In time, they hope to bring in more hybrid works and experimental essays, photography and art, contests, and themed issues.

The first issue includes fiction from Lindsay Hunter, Casey Hannan, Aaron Teel, Ryan Werner, Edward Hagelstein, Helen McClory, and Jesse Hertz; nonfiction from Matthew Gavin Frank, Laura Zak, and Will Kaufman; and poetry from Bianca Diaz, Sarah Wynn, Donald Parker, Jenna Lynch, Cameron Witbeck, Daniel Romo, Charles Rafferty, and Valentina Cano.

The deadline for the next issue is mid-January, and Sundog Lit accepts submissions through Submittable. The other editors of the magazine include Fiction Editor Mensah Demary, Nonfiction Editor Richard Hackler, Poetry Editors Zarah Moeggenberg and Amy Pajewski, and Website Design and Nonfiction Editor Cynthia Brandon Slocum.
Published October 29, 2012
Roger Williams University—situated on the shore of Mount Hope Bay in Rhode Island—is putting out a new biannual magazine called Mount Hope. It is available as a print issue as well as online via Issuu. They are looking for “good, literary, readable stories and poems” as well as essays and memoir. “Beyond writing,” says Editor Edward J. Delaney, “we like to run photography and graphic storytelling—a segment of a graphic novel or a stand-alone—with an emphasis on storytelling and literary merit.

Delaney says that Mount Hope is “the latest iteration of the literary magazine published for four decades at RWU, which has one of the first BFA Creative Writing Programs in the U.S., recently celebrating its 40th anniversary. Our mission is to give students hands-on experience and to support writers and the writing community.” Alongside Delaney is Poetry Editor Shelley Puhak and Adam Braver, writer-in-residence.

Within the magazine, readers will enjoy realistic, quality writing. “We favor stories in which something happens, and poetry that is not for insiders only,” says Delaney. They hope to “be a venue for lively work of interest to a general readership.”

The first issue features Steve Almond (nonfiction), Michael Cirelli, Christopher Hennessey (poetry), Denis Darzacq (photography), Matthew Hall (graphic novel), and interviews with Rick Moody and Lynne Sharon Schwartz.

They take submissions via email year-round with a three to six month cycle turn-around response. They accept simultaneous submissions.
Published October 23, 2012
Paradise Review is a brand new online quarterly magazine featuring fiction, poetry, and visual art. Editor Joseph Han says that, along with his co-editor Joseph D. Lewis and poetry editor Lindsey Appleton, they want “to join the various online literary community already fostering across the globe, highlighting the hard work of writers who dare to put themselves out there with the hope of having their voices read and heard.”

The name refers to the location of the publication and also means “to communicate the idea that as an online mag, with work coming from absolutely anywhere, paradise is relative as a sense of accomplishment, state of mind/being, or physical space.” Han says that readers can expect to find “stories and poems that have moved and startled the staff as readers themselves, those that have begged to be shared and featured.”

The first issue features fiction from John Abbott, Nicholas T. Brown, Keith Rebec, and Stephanie Wilson; poetry from Daniel Wilcox, James Robinson, James Piatt, Michelle Matthees, Stan Galloway, Yevgeniy Levitskiy, Yvette A. Schnoeker-Shorb, and Zvi A. Sesling; and visual art from Jenean McBrearty, Karim Hetherington, and Sarah Edwards.

Han says that they hope to eventually become a monthly publication that features local and national writers. “We want to see a writer’s best,” he says. “By that, we mean writing that is believed in despite the preferences of other publications and the need to emulate different styles, literary figures, or contemporaries.” Submissions are accepted through Submittable.


Published October 22, 2012
The book publishing company Two Dollar Radio is starting a new project: a biannual print magazine called Frequencies. “We never set out to duplicate what others are doing and already doing well,” says Editor Eric Obenauf. “Artful essays cover an area that we felt wasn't being sufficiently represented. With some inspiration from Occupy Wall Street, we wanted to champion work that celebrated the individual through both voice and vision. We're billing Frequencies as a grungier, less self-righteous Harper's.”

Obenauf says that readers can expect to find artful essays that “challenge the current nonfiction prescription.” Each issue has cover art and illustrations by John Gagliano. “The idea was to create a really taut arena,” says Obenauf, “so there are no empty calories in the form of music or book reviews, no random filler just to increase page count, which ideally totals an attractive space for writers to showcase their work.”

Alongside Obenauf is the interviews editor, Emily Pullen who, in the first issue, interviews poet Anne Carson. Other writers in the first issue include Blake Butler, Joshua Cohen, Tracy Rose Keaton, and Scott McClanahan with photography by Morgan Kendall.

The second issue "will feature Sara Finnerty on ghosts, Roxane Gay on issues of belonging in middle class black America, Alex Jung on the gay sex tourist trade in Thailand, Kate Zambreno on actress/director Barbara Loden, and more."

Frequencies accepts submissions on a rolling basis; completed submissions can be sent via email as attachments. Frequencies does pay for published work. Please see the website for submission information.
Published October 16, 2012
Lunch Ticket is a new online biannual magazine that evokes “school, hanging with friends, having interesting discussions over bologna sandwiches.” The name comes from a program Antioch University Los Angeles used to have in which a new student would be paired with an experienced student for lunch and given a “lunch ticket.” Current Editor-in-Chief Lise Quintana says that since Antioch is one of the top 5 low-residency MFA programs in the country and didn’t have its own literary magazine, there was a clear need to start Lunch Ticket. “[It] exists both to showcase great literary talent and to support Antioch University Los Angeles’s mission of social justice,” Quintana says.

She says that you can expect to find “interviews with interesting and important authors (our premier issue had an interview with Natasha Trethewey, poet laureate of the United States), essays on social justice issues, and great writing by authors from all over.”

The staff are all current MFA students at Antioch. “We know what it’s like putting yourself out there,” says Quintana, “and we appreciate the support we’ve been shown.” The editors vary per issue, but currently the editor-in-chief is Quintana, the fiction editor is Kathleen Rohr, the Writing for Young People editor is Kristen Schroer, the creative nonfiction editor is Wendy Fontaine, the poetry editor is Janice Luo, and the art editor is Audrey Mandelbaum.

The first issue features interviews by Natasha Trethewey, Gregory Boyle, Rick Moody, and Francesca Lia Block; essays by Naomi Benaron and Nancy L. Conyers; fiction by Jennifer A. Orth-Veillon, Jessica Pitchford, Diana Payne, Kyle Hemmings, Jenny Dunning, Terry Sanville, and LaToya Watkins; creative nonfiction by Andy Johnson (nominated for a Pushcart Prize), Mark Brazaitis, Sion Dayson, and John Calderazzo; Writing for Young People by G. Neri; and poetry by Andrei Guruianu, Hugh Behm-Steinberg, James Valdis, Nate Pritts, Martin Ott and John F. Buckley, Sheila Black, George Bishop, Yim Tang Wong, R L Swihart, Derek Pollard, Eleanor Levine, Lois Marie Harrod, Dina Hardy, Ricky Garni, Valentina Cano, and Gabriel Cabrera.

In the future, the staff would like “a more ambitious art section, incorporating more writing about art.” The would also like to create a best-of anthology as a print-on-demand hardcopy book.

The current reading period ends at the end of this month and is reopened in March, although writers and artists can send their submissions at any time. Submissions can be sent through Submittable.

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