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Book Reviews by Title - E (33)

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  • Book Type Anthology Edited
  • by Laura Long and Doug Van Gundy
  • Date Published March 2017
  • ISBN-13 978-1-943665-54-9
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 336pp
  • Price $32.99
  • Review by Valerie Wieland

One should think of reading Eyes Glowing at the Edge of the Woods as a welcome to West Virginia. Sixty-three West Virginians fill this anthology with vivid poetry and fiction that serve to characterize their “wild and wonderful” state.

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  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Gleah Powers
  • Date Published September 2016
  • ISBN-13 978-1-925417-18-0
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 156pp
  • Price $13.99
  • Review by Valerie Wieland

Gleah Powers counts being an actor, model, bartender and teacher of alternative therapies among her many careers. Recently, she’s chosen to add fiction writer to the list with her first novella, Edna & Luna. Powers’s writing style is peppy and easily readable as she tells the story of two diverse women whose lives intersect in the American Southwest.

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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Kathryn Nuernberger
  • Date Published September 2016
  • ISBN-13 978-1-942683-14-8
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 96pp
  • Price $16.00
  • Review by Ryo Yamaguchi

There is an abiding anguish that swells like a tidal water through Kathryn Nuernberger’s new book, The End of Pink. It’s an emotional force that takes a little while to establish, not yet fully evident while reading through the table of contents or perusing the first few poems, which seem at first like relatively straightforward engagements with historic books of science and pseudoscience, poems that are the result of the purposeful taking of a subject of study.

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  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Maureen Millea Smith
  • Date Published July 2016
  • ISBN-13 978-1-60489-168-3
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 194pp
  • Price $17.95
  • Review by Allyson Hoffman

In twelve stories linked by the bonds of family and friendship, The Enigma of Iris Murphy captures the lives of those affected by the life and works of public defender, Iris Murphy. Characters across the United States—from Omaha to Cincinnati to the Rosebud Reservation—are forever changed by Iris Murphy, in big and small ways. Author Maureen Millea Smith carefully weaves narratives together so that tensions grow throughout the book, and the collection truly reads as a novel in stories.

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  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Cynan Jones
  • Date Published April 2016
  • ISBN-13 978-1-56689-436-4
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 248pp
  • Price $15.95
  • Review by Valerie Wieland

Everything I Found on the Beach, by Cynan Jones, begins with police finding a mutilated body on a Welsh beach. What comes next is an unnamed woman opening an envelope, the contents of which fill her with high emotion. I could hardly wait to find out whose body it is and what’s up with the woman.

  • Subtitle Short Fiction from a Small Planet
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  • Book Type Anthology Edited
  • by Clifford Garstang
  • Date Published October 2014
  • ISBN-13 978-1-941209-11-0
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 234pp
  • Price $19.95
  • Review by Kayla Grose
The world seems bigger than what it is. The twenty pieces of short fiction in Everywhere Stories reminds us of this as it closes the gap between countries and cultures, successfully condensing 24,901 miles into a 234 page book. Forget language barriers, plane tickets for the price of a new car, or time constraints—it’s possible to travel the world without ever leaving the comfort of your favorite reading nook.
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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Annelyse Gelman
  • Date Published April 2014
  • ISBN-13 978-1-938912-42-9
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 80pp
  • Price $15.00
  • Review by Katy Haas
The poetry in Everyone I Love is a Stranger to Someone by Annelyse Gelman is witty, comfortable, and contemporary. Nothing too heavy waits inside the bright blue cover, and even the heavier moments are lightened by Gelman’s sly humor, a welcome presence throughout the poems.
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  • Book Type Cross-Genre
  • by Alex Green
  • Date Published January 2015
  • ISBN-13 978-1-936767-37-3
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 84pp
  • Price $15.95
  • Review by Jason Hess
Alex Green's collection of short prose is aptly titled Emergency Anthems. Brooklyn Arts Press wisely bills the book as a collection of “Short Fiction/Prose Poems,” leaving elbow-patched professor types to duke it out over finer genre distinctions. Alas, I regularly cling to genre like it's a life-raft in wild waters. The stories/poems are presented as block paragraphs with justified left and right margins. The majority of these shorts don't feature any traditional narrative arc, no building and releasing of tension. Without the floatation device of genre, the word “Anthem” feels like an appropriate designation for Green's short bursts of prose.
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  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Arna Bontemps Hemenway
  • Date Published July 2014
  • ISBN-13 978-1-9396747-76-4
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 224pp
  • Price $15.95
  • Review by Trena Machado
Elegy on Kinderklavier is a debut collection of seven short stories. The driving force across the stories is violence. The characters are forced to the edge of the world, intruded upon by one form of violence or another: war, terminal illness, loss of loved ones before their time, death and mutilation by explosives. Violence, in all its forms, is the hovering, unpredictable specter and Hemenway handles it with innovative, effective techniques.
  • Subtitle Poems and Fragments
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  • Book Type Edited
  • by Tony Trigilio
  • Date Published April 2014
  • ISBN-13 978-1-934103-49-4
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 208pp
  • Price $28.00
  • Review by Patrick James Dunagan
Elise Cowen is a name unlikely to ring a bell for any readers unfamiliar with the now rather legendary American literary phenomenon of the Beat Generation. Yet her writing will likely intrigue and warrant interest to a readership well beyond that demographic. Cowen's brief life (1933-1962) proves rather remarkable for a young, unmarried woman of the era: she freely and openly explored her sexuality with multiple lovers of both sexes, including Allen Ginsberg, with whom she appears to have formed a deeper attachment, likely unreturned in kind; spent time living in both New York City and San Francisco, establishing relationships and friendships with artist communities in both cities; experimented habitually with drugs and alcohol; and dedicated herself to the pursuit of a poetic, intellectual life as much as possible all the while.
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