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Tuesday; An Art Project – Fall 2007

Tuesday; An Art Project may technically be a literary journal; however, ‘art project’ describes it so much better. It arrives as a series of postcard-like cards, printed on one or both sides, with poems, photographs or prints, well wrapped in sturdy, folded, thick, almost cardboard-like paper. The title and subtitle are neatly printed on one side of the wrapper, the names of the authors and artists on the other, plus the subscription price. It unfolds to display a table of contents inside, plus a list of editors, advisory board, detailed background description of the artists and authors, a featured poem, and, the cards themselves. There are eighteen sturdy, pure-white, five-by-seven-inch cards; fourteen contain poems, four display photographs.

Tuesday; An Art Project may technically be a literary journal; however, ‘art project’ describes it so much better. It arrives as a series of postcard-like cards, printed on one or both sides, with poems, photographs or prints, well wrapped in sturdy, folded, thick, almost cardboard-like paper. The title and subtitle are neatly printed on one side of the wrapper, the names of the authors and artists on the other, plus the subscription price. It unfolds to display a table of contents inside, plus a list of editors, advisory board, detailed background description of the artists and authors, a featured poem, and, the cards themselves. There are eighteen sturdy, pure-white, five-by-seven-inch cards; fourteen contain poems, four display photographs.

The poetry is basic, and good. One gem, “For Mr. Grimes Who Tried to Teach Me Physics After My Father Died” by John Hodgen, gracefully draws parallels between physics’ and life’s lessons: “He spoke of gravity, of the earth that draws us to itself.” Noelle Kocot’s “The Peace That So Lovingly Descends” tugs effectively at my heart with, “I sleep without you, / And the letters that you sent / Are now faded into failed lessons.” She evocatively puts loss into physical perspective. My favorite is “Symbiosis” by Don Share: “The maimed coyote in the wetland / beyond our sunken fence / croaks all night alone.”

There may have been any number of reasons for putting art in this form rather than a traditional journal format – you can mail the cards as gifts, put them up on the refrigerator or wall, frame them, put them in a mobile or collage, or keep it as is, like a packet of treasures. Any way, it is unique, worth taking a look.
[www.tuesdayjournal.org

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