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The Antioch Review – Winter 2007

Antioch Review celebrates its 65th year of publication with this fine issue’s eclectic collection of essays, fiction, poetry, book reviews, and et cetera, which includes Editor Robert S. Fogarty’s thoughtful editorial, “Nolan Miller (1907 – 2006),” on the last of the journal’s founding editors, and John Taylor’s “Poetry Today.” Thomas Washington’s “A Quarterly Reader (and Writer),” laments the absence of editorials in many quarterlies, as do I. If you enjoy sophisticated spy stories, you’ll love “Tunis and Time” by Peter LaSalle; Stephen Taylor’s “Bloomsbury Nights: Being, Food and Love” will bring you closer, perhaps (to a dictionary); “Odessa” by Rick DeMarinis will remind you of those among us who cannot sort things out.

Antioch Review celebrates its 65th year of publication with this fine issue’s eclectic collection of essays, fiction, poetry, book reviews, and et cetera, which includes Editor Robert S. Fogarty’s thoughtful editorial, “Nolan Miller (1907 – 2006),” on the last of the journal’s founding editors, and John Taylor’s “Poetry Today.” Thomas Washington’s “A Quarterly Reader (and Writer),” laments the absence of editorials in many quarterlies, as do I. If you enjoy sophisticated spy stories, you’ll love “Tunis and Time” by Peter LaSalle; Stephen Taylor’s “Bloomsbury Nights: Being, Food and Love” will bring you closer, perhaps (to a dictionary); “Odessa” by Rick DeMarinis will remind you of those among us who cannot sort things out. The contents also contain these wonderful evocations: “Reflections, Observations, Memories” by Richard Stern; Jeffrey Meyers’s “Samuel Demands the Muse: Johnson’s Stamp on Imaginative Literature,” and just how pervasive a stamp Meyers shows by examining the work of Hawthorne, Austen, Housman, Woolf, Beckett (and everyone who has used a dictionary); these lines worth note from Jacqueline Osherow’s 56-verse “Snow in Umbria”: “But those tracts and tracts of black diminished trees, / bore all the hallmarks of a fire’s path. / Is that where Petrarch got I burn and freeze? / He’d witnessed such a snow or, rather, its aftermath?” And a memorable understatement from Lawrence Rosenwald’s “Notes on Pacifism”: “Some people believe, wrote William James, that war ‘is a sort of sacrament . . . an absolute good . . . human nature at its highest dynamic . . . the essential form of the State, and the only function in which peoples can employ all their powers at once and convergently.’ People who hold these beliefs aren’t open to pacifism. [Italics mine.]
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