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NewPages Book Reviews

Reviews of newly published and forthcoming independent and university press titles.

Posted April 03, 2018

  • Image Image
  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Phillip Sterling
  • Date Published May 2017
  • ISBN-13 978-1-59948-627-7
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 80pp
  • Price $14.00
  • Review by Natalie Tomlin
By some stroke of luck, I had Philip Sterling’s new book with me as I laid in bed, sick from the change in altitude after arriving in Bogota, Colombia. As I choked down saltines and felt sorry for myself, these self-effacing, wise, and often revelatory poems delivered me from myself for a few hours.
  • Subtitle Poems of the Manhattan Project
  • Image Image
  • Book Type Poetry
  • by John Canaday
  • Date Published September 2017
  • ISBN-13 978-0-8263-5883-7
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 216pp
  • Price $19.95
  • Review by Valerie Wieland

John Canaday’s newest book of poetry, Critical Assembly: Poems of the Manhattan Project, easily reads like a story about an era of American history that impacted the entire world. The Manhattan Project, code name for creation of atomic bombs during World War II, referred to the New York City borough where the project’s headquarters were located. The bombs, however, were assembled in New Mexico at the Los Alamos Laboratory and tested in a desert near Alamogordo, New Mexico, in 1945.

  • Image Image
  • Book Type Poetry
  • by EJ Koh
  • Date Published October 2017
  • ISBN-13 978-0-807167779
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 78pp
  • Price $17.95
  • Review by DM O'Connor
If I can own anyone
I ask for none

unlike orchids that cannot
grow unless paired.

I don’t know.
I remember you loved

to swim. Everything I am
become water
                            —“Madrona”
  • Image Image
  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Dong Xi
  • Translated From the Chinese
  • by Dylan Levi King
  • Date Published March 2018
  • ISBN-13 978-0-8061-6000-9
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 240pp
  • Price $24.95
  • Review by Valerie Wieland

Dong Xi, author of the novel Record of Regret, began submitting writing to Chinese magazines when he was fifteen, according to the novel’s translator Dylan Levi King. Since then, Dong Xi, the pen name of Tian Dailin, has written four novels and is a writer in residence at Guangxi University for Nationalities, China.

  • Subtitle Stories
  • Image Image
  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Ryan Habermeyer
  • Date Published May 2018
  • ISBN-13 978-1-942683-60-5
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 216pp
  • Price $16.00
  • Review by Evgeniya Monico

When first opening The Science of Lost Futures, I was already familiar with some of Ryan Habermeyer’s works, so I knew what to expect. Or so I thought. Habermeyer’s mysterious fiction defied all my expectations. This collection of stories pulled me into the strange world where a woman can turn into a snow leopard, people admire a giant foot, and turkeys take over a house. These strange occurrences, however, become fantastic circumstances for Habermeyer to explore human relationships. In this collection of witty stories, Ryan Habermeyer places humans in bizarre and sometimes absurd conditions which creates a rich world with relationships at its center.

  • Subtitle Surviving the Titanic
  • Image Image
  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Anna M. Evans
  • Date Published May 2018
  • ISBN-13 978-1-77349-012-0
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 82pp
  • Price $17.95
  • Review by Katy Haas

I still remember being in awe as I first learned about the RMS Titanic in grade school. I pored over books with clear pages I could peel away to reveal the layers of the giant ship, I unsuccessfully tried to imagine the wonder the public felt at the size of the ship with its pool and gym and cargo and grand staircase, and I repeatedly played through the 1996 PC game, Titanic: Adventure Out of Time, that takes place onboard. Despite all of this, there was still always an incomprehensible aspect to it—the ship, accident, and amount of lives lost. With years between its existence and my own and with games and movies made about the tragic event, there was something “unreal” about the Titanic. That’s where Anna M. Evans comes in.

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