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NewPages Lit Mag Reviews

Posted December 15, 2015

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  • Issue Number Volume 15 Number 2
  • Published Date Fall 2015
  • Publication Cycle Biannual
The Fall 2015 Bellevue Literary Review from NYU’s Langone Medical Center operates under the subtitle “Embattled: Ramifications of War.” Self-described as a “journal of humanity and human experience” this issue focuses specifically on narratives surrounding not only war, but war’s varying and often heartbreaking effects on the human experience. The short fiction, poetry, and nonfiction explore delicate topics such as PTSD, death on the frontlines, and post-deployment readjustments with an unflinching matter-of-factness paired with beautiful language.
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  • Issue Number Volume 21, Number 2
  • Published Date Autumn 2015
  • Publication Cycle Biannual
The Bitter Oleander’s autumn issue is a motherlode of bold interpretations softened with poems like the delightfully introspective, “I Don’t Want to Write” by Simon Anton Nino Diego Raena. “Leave me alone, please. / All I want is to enjoy the solitude of being / a nonentity in this lightless balcony.”
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  • Issue Number Issue 94
  • Published Date Fall 2015
  • Publication Cycle Triannual
The Fall 2015 issue of Glimmer Train Stories is a delightful showcase of short fiction from both new and established writers, packing twelve short stories, an interview, and a short essay in its 200+ pages. Whether there is an explicit theme is unknown, but the majority of the pieces have a couple of common threads, primarily youth and family.
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  • Issue Number Issue 47
  • Published Date 2015
  • Publication Cycle Biannual
Harvard Review began life in 1986 as a four-page quarterly called Erato. Today it’s a 200+ page, perfect-bound semi-annual. Many Pulitzer Prize writers have been featured over the years, and this issue contains two Pulitzer nominees: Martín Espada, a 2006 finalist, who writes a tribute to his father in “The Shamrock,” and Cornelius Eady, a 1992 nominee. His poem “The Death of Robert Johnson” has these skilled, telling lines: “That that gal I kissed, / And her husband seeing that, / Was the fine print, / The way things get / Paid off.”
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  • Issue Number Issue 2
  • Published Date 2015
  • Publication Cycle Biannual
Paralleling the instructions in the publication’s opening “Salutations from the Staff”—where the reader is told to gather a variety of ingredients to let simmer—the editors of Meat for Tea have compiled a diverse selection of genres and writing styles in the “Fond” issue. The unifying thread among the pieces is experimentation, either in structure or content. This issue is a collection of permissions, inviting readers to explore the new directions of contemporary creative writing.
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  • Issue Number Issue 8
  • Published Date Autumn 2015
  • Publication Cycle Quarterly
Created by three women in Vancouver—Melanie Anastasiou, Jennifer Landels and Susan Pieters—the hybrid PULP Literature “publish[es] writing that breaks out of the bookshelf boundaries, defies genre, surprises, and delights,” according to their website. “Think of it as a wine-tasting . . .  or a pub crawl . . . where you’ll experience new flavours and rediscover old favourites.”
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  • Issue Number Volume 4 Number 3
  • Published Date Summer/Fall 2015
  • Publication Cycle Biannual
Storm Cellar is a slim little lit mag, just the right size to slip into my already-near-bursting tote bag. It’s the perfect magazine to keep on hand when readers have a few moments to spare before bed or while drinking their morning coffee.
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  • Issue Number Issue 2
  • Published Date 2015
  • Publication Cycle Biannual
Story publishes pieces following a particular theme, and the Monsters issue is as haunting as the title suggests. Stephen T. Asma writes in his essay, “Monsters and the Moral Imagination,” “Good monster stories can transmit moral truths to us by showing us examples of dignity and depravity without preaching or proselytizing.” The pieces chosen for this issue do exactly that, ranging from things that go bump in the night to memories that haunt individuals each day.
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  • Issue Number Number 11
  • Published Date 2015
  • Publication Cycle Annual
Upstreet 11 contains seven fiction pieces, six creative nonfiction pieces, forty-five poems, and an interview. That’s over 200 pages of engaging entertainment from a broad variety of accomplished authors.
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