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Katy Haas

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A (mostly) children's bookstore. Your local connection for hand-picked books, unique gifts and community events.

Omaha - Next Chapter

October 29, 2019
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the Next Chapter is a small, independent bookstore located in mid-town Omaha, selling new books, gifts, greeting cards and more.

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Porter House Review. Editor's Prize. Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, Art. Entry Fee. [mag] 12/1

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2019 october prize winnersToday we’re bringing you a tall stack of award-winning fiction and poetry books published this past month. Click Read More to find the full list.

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glimmer train i106 fall 2019It’s never easy to say good-bye, but readers should still take the time to say their farewells to the fiction monolith Glimmer Train. The Fall 2019 issue is here, marking the end of an era for the literary magazine.

The final issue features stories by Stanley Delgado, Rachael Uwada Clifford, Marian Palaia, Douglas Kiklowicz, Erika Krouse, Victoria Alejandra Garayalde, Arthur Russell, Robin Halevy, Peter Parsons, Christa Romanosky, Sindya Bhanoo, Alex Stein, Karen Malley, Ed Allen, Emily Lackey, Ashley Alliano, Aleyna Rentz, Kevin Canty, and Arthur Klepchukov. Also in the final issue: interviews with Matthew Lansburgh and Danielle Lazarin.

Stop by the Glimmer Train website to give them a proper send-off. Grab a copy of the last two issues, check out story excerpts, and pick up copies of available back issues.

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laux millar prize blogIn the Fall 2019 issue of Raleigh Review, readers can find the winners and finalists of the 2019 Laux/Millar Poetry Prize, selected by Dorianne Laux & Joseph Millar. Readers can easily find these pieces in the current issue as they're outlined in gradient blue (winner) and pink (finalists).

Winner
Iguana Iguana” by Caylin Capra-Thomas

Finalists:
"At the Bar" by Cameron McGill
"The Land in Both Our Names" by Suzanne Grove
"After Watching The Quiet Man" by Hannah Dow
"Sertraline" by Emily Nason

Submissions to the 2020 Laux/Millar Poetry Prize will reopen in April and run through May.​​

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april sopkin blogThe Fall 2019 issue of Carve Magazine features the winners of the 2019 Raymond Carver Contest, guest-judged by Claire Fuller. These can be found online, as well as in the print issue. An interview with each writer can be found after their stories in the print edition.

First Place
“Private Lives” by April Sopkin

Second Place
“Gravity House” by Carolyn Bishop

Third Place
“The Enchanted Forest” by Brian Crawford

Editor’s Choice
“The Ghost Rider” by Erica Plouffe Lazure

The Raymond Carver Contest reopens for submissions in April. The Carve Magazine Prose & Poetry Contest is currently open until November 15.

Two Poems by ko ko thett

November 01, 2019
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tiger moth reviewThe Tiger Moth Review publishes art and literature that “engages with nature, culture, the environment, and ecology” from Singapore and beyond.

In Issue 2, ko ko thett drew me in by writing about one of my favorite animals: elephants. “Funeral of an elephant” speculates on what is needed to mourn the death of the creature: the amount of men needed to carry the casket, how the casket should be made, what traditions to apply to this funeral, whether or not it weighs more dead than alive. thett prompts readers to hold this death in as great esteem as a human’s. I feel this is especially relevant after recent reports of eleven elephants dying as they attempted to save one another at a waterfall in Thailand. With their actions, as in thett’s poem, we see the humanity in the lives of these creatures.

thett also dedicates a poem to “The Chindwin,” a river in Burma. thett humanizes the river, comparing it to a “soon-to-be single mother,” a dominatrix, a woman puking, pissing, bleeding. There are no gentle verses here, just the ripping force of a river tearing away the landscape and the humans who have wronged her.

In both pieces, thett makes readers consider the humanness of nature, a nice selection to usher in the rest of this issue of The Tiger Moth Review.

 

Review by Katy Haas

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MA in Creative Writing
fiction, nonfiction, poetry, screenwriting

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