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Denise Hill

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iron cityIf this data shared by Iron City Magazine doesn’t startle or sadden you, then you need to get woke: "The U.S., with less than 5% of the world’s population, has more than 20% of its prisoners, more people by raw number than any other nation in the world, regardless of size. Given that 1 in 135 Americans lives behind bars, U.S. prison complexes are like vast cities. If they were made into a state, it would be the 36th most populated."

Iron City Magazine: Creative Expressions By and For the Incarcerated  is an annual online and print journal devoted entirely to writing and art from the prison world, and one that we should all be reading. The name, Iron City Magazine ’s Marketing Editor Jacqueline Aguilar tells me, comes from the image the word "prison" conjures in most of us: "Even though most prisons are chiefly nowadays made of concrete more than iron, it’s still the iron doors, iron bars, and razor wire that most resonate with our image of prison life."
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The Spring/Summer 2018 issue of Black Warrior Review features the winners of their annual writing contest:

black warrior reviewNonfiction Contest Winner
Judge: Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib
"The Best Lighting for My Body Was at the White Horse Inn and Bar, Oakland, California" by Tony Wei Ling

Flash Prose Contest Winner
Judge: Joyelle McSweeney
"Auto-Da-Fé: Confession And Camouflauge" by M.J. Gette

Fiction Contest Winner
Judge: Nicola Griffith
"The World Holds What It Remembers Most" by Tess Allard

Poetry Contest Winner
Judge: Rachel McKibbens
"From a Poet to her Rumbero" by Sarah María Medina

Cover Art: "Undomesticated Interior No. 7" by Lisa Krannichfeld

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new england review

Monolith by Jeanne Borofsky on the cover of Volume 29 Number 1 2018 welcomes readers to the party celebrating New England Review's forty years of publication.

hotel amerika

Kourtney Roy's pouting princess portrait entitled "Mythology" from autopotraits I is an intriguing cover choice for Hotel Amerika's Spring 2018 issue.

ndr

Croatian-born artist Moondrusannah's artwork, featured in the online 8.1 issue of New Delta Review, is from her Illustrated Dreams Diary, of which she says, "Any clue to What Girls Really Dream About? I’m just starting to find that out myself, and I like what I see."

 

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Works by winners of the Ruminate 2018 Kalos Visual Art Prize can be viewed in the Spring 2018 issue, with a still from Eloisa Guanlao's digital documentary Noli Me Tangere featured on the publication's cover.ruminate

First Place
Eloisa Guanlao

Second Place
Janet McKenzie

Honorable Mention
Joseph Di Bella

Information about each of these selected artists and a full list of finalists can be found here.

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creative nonfictionPittsburgh-based literary magazine Creative Nonfiction is the winner of the 2018 Association of Writers and Writing Programs (AWP) Small Press Publisher Award. The prize was announced in Tampa, Florida, at an opening ceremony at AWP’s annual conference and bookfair, which brings together 11,000+ writers, teachers, and small-press publishers. The other finalists were Fence, the Normal School, and Terrain.org.

AWP’s Small Press Publisher Award is an annual prize for nonprofit presses and literary journals that recognizes the important role such organizations play in publishing creative works and introducing new authors to the reading public. The award acknowledges the hard work, creativity, and innovation of these presses and journals, and honors their contributions to the literary landscape through their publication of consistently excellent work. The award includes a $2,000 honorarium and a complimentary exhibit booth at the AWP Conference & Bookfair in the year following the recipient’s recognition. The prize is given to literary magazines in even years; Creative Nonfiction was a finalist in both 2014 and 2016.

Creative Nonfiction founder and editor Lee Gutkind said, “It’s really nice to be recognized in this way. Creative Nonfiction’s small staff is incredibly dedicated, and does so much with so little. And thanks go to our contributors—the writers and artists whose work makes the magazine possible. Twenty-four years ago, we brought the very first issue of Creative Nonfiction to this conference, and I was so nervous … but we sold every copy. So, thanks go to AWP, too, for all their support over the years.”

Creative Nonfiction is true stories, well told. Each issue of the quarterly features original essays and illustrations; writing that pushes traditional boundaries of the genre; notes on craft; micro-essays; conversations with writers and editors; and more. Almost every issue includes a writer’s first publication, and the editorial team emphasizes a thoughtful editorial process and rigorous fact-checking as vital elements of the organization’s overall educational mission. Visit creativenonfiction.org to learn more.
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thema spring 2018

Thema's cover photo for their Spring 2018 issue is "Question the Answer" by Kathleen Gunton, appropriately fitting for the theme: "Is There a Word for That?" Perhaps not a word, but a beautiful image instead. Upcoming themes in search of submissions: "Where's the food truck?" (July 1) and "The critter in the attic" (November 1).

georgia review

 The cover and internal art portfolio of Georgia Review's Winter 2017 issue features a very different kind of garden life by sculptor Toshihiko Mitsuya: Aluminum. "Far from static," Mitsuya says of his medium, "it takes on the feelings of its surroundings - the wind, the light an the hands that touch it.As a material, aluminum starts in a huge factory and ends in something precious yet transitive: the installation reclaims an industrial material back to nature."

kaleidoscope

As unique as the vision through the cylindrical optic toy, Kaleidoscope is a publication "exploring the experiene of disability through literature and the arts." Kristin Gehrmann's "The Vial Keeper" reflects the Winter/Spring 2018 theme: Life's Unpredicatbiilty. Now available open access online, readers unfamilar with this journal should defnitely check it out.

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hitchlit reviewThe HitchLit Review: A Secular Literary-Arts Journal publishes online twice per year, poetry, fiction, and non-fiction, and would consider short, stand-alone scenes from plays and screen plays as well as visual art and cover design. “There are many literary magazines,” The HitchLit Review  Founder and Editor Daniel Ruefman tells me, “but in a growing community of secular voices, few publications are focused on giveing them a platform. In addition to that, there are a lot of misunderstandings about what it means to be secular today (atheist, agnostic, freethinker, skeptic, etc.). By highlighting secular voices through literature and art, HitchLit  hopes to confront stereotypes and demonstrate just how diverse the secular community is.”

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new orleans reviewThe Editor's Note in New Orleans Review Issue 43 (Themed: "This Hustle Is Not Your Grandpa’s African Lit") contained the following announcement:

"Since its founding in 1968, New Orleans Review  has had the pleasure of including in its pages the work of hundreds of writers, poets, essayists, critics, celebrities, and artists from around the world. We take particular delight in having published numerous 'first-time-in-print' authors as well as offering eclectic volumes on a range of topics and forms – from Alexander Pope’s 'The Rape of the Lock' to Post-Structuralism, from Spanish-language film to Czech writing in translation, and from Science Fiction to a set of seven chapbooks enclosed in a slipcase. As the journal enters its 50th year, this special issue on contemporary writing from Africa celebrates our final printed volume. Both honoring its past and embracing its future, New Orleans Review  will continue to publish new work in an expanded digital venue, which will also include free access to all 50 years of print issues."

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The most recent issue of Cold Mountain Review (v45 n2) features winners of the 2017 R.T. Smith Prize for Narrative Poetry:

jeff burtWinner
"We will Never Mend This" by Jeff Burt [pictured]
Read the beautifully heart-wrenching poem and hear it read by the author here.

Honorable Mention
"A Sestina for Traveling Season" by Geetha Iyer
"To Shadow" by Matthew Winberley

Finalist
"Prologue" by Jude Whelchel

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louisville review

Gerald Plain's photo "Spider Rock, Canyon DeChelly, Arizona" dizzying perspective draws readers into the newest issue of The Louisville Review (#82, Fall 2017). Inside, The Children's Corner features high school sophomore Haemaru Chung's poem "Waking Up."

cherry tree

Looking forward to summer, I enjoy this cover image (also a bit dizzying) on issue four of Cherry Tree national literary journal published out of Washington College: "Children Running in Backlight (Dozza, Italy)" by Claudio Cricca.

writing disorder

The Art of Miss Fluff is featured in the Winter 2017-2018 issue of The Writing Disorder, and online quarterly of new and emerging writers and artists. Fluff is "an enchanting design brand created by artist, Claudette Barjoud."

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