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Denise Hill

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hannah ambrosePrime Number is a quarterly online publication of "distinctive poetry and short fiction that takes readers to new places, introducing them to interesting characters, situations, and observations." A publication of Press 53, the editors enjoy engaging writers in two monthly contests: the Prime Number Magazine Flash Fiction Contest, which is a low-cost ($7 - a prime number) reading fee with a prime number first prize of $251, and the 53-Word Story Contest, which is free (is 0 a prime number?) and comes with a prompt.

Both winners are published in future issues of the publication.

Winners currently featured are Flash Fiction “Interrogation” by Michael Chin and 53-Word Story "Dance on my Grave" by Hannah Ambrose [pictured].

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Winners of the Terrain.org 8th Annual Contest in Fiction, Nonfiction, and Poetry each receive $500 in addition to publication. Finalists are awarded $100 and publication.

jennie goodePoetry Winner
Judge Robert Wrigley
“Tying a Tie” and “Airborne”, two poems by Edward Harkness
Finalists: Poems by Ellery Akers, Deborah Fass, and John Pass.

Nonfiction Winner
Judge Nicole Walker
“Ghost Trees” by Jennie Goode [pictured]
Finalists: “What Remained” by Kristina Moriconi and “Northern Wardens” by Alisa Slaughter

Fiction Winner
Judge Padma Viswanathan
“N-Place Exiting” by Thomas Ausa
Finalist: “The Stilled Ring” by Luther Allen

Read more about the winning works here. The contest re-opens in January 2018.

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The Editors at Broadsided Press write:

Broadsided

We have, according to the constitution, the right “to keep and bear arms” in the United States. But how, in the wake of Las Vegas, Pulse, Sandy Hook, Trayvon Martin, and other abuses of firearms—by citizens and in some cases by those trained to protect and serve—do we bear that right? How do we bear it?

At Broadsided, we believe that art and literature belong in our daily lives. They inspire and demonstrate the vitality and depth of our connection with the world. We had to speak out—we had to make a space for you to speak out—on this issue as part of our ongoing "Broadsided Responds" feature.

We put out a call to visual artists asking for submissions. Work came from all over the country, in all media. Powerful, provocative, dynamic work. Guest Arts Editor Stacy Isenbarger selected six pieces that offer a range of attitudes, aesthetics, and opportunities. Of her decision, Stacy has this to say:

How do we confront that of which we already hold tightly? Collectively, these chosen works offer a dimensional conversation of this weighted issue. Some may suggest a boundary of societal judgement, but they don’t necessarily reveal what side they are one. Instead these pieces offer evolving space. They welcome an opportunity for viewers to discuss how we bear that which touches our lives.

We now ask you to respond with words to six works of visual art by Sandra Cohen, Jonathan Frey, David Kamm, Osceola Refetoff, Dixie Salazar, and Kristen Woodward.

See full images and guidelines here.

When you submit your writing, be sure to be clear as to which piece you are responding.

DEADLINE: December 27, 2017.

 

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into the void"The Cowards" by French photographer Iva Iova on the cover of Into the Void #6 is from her series, The Remains , of which she writes, "The last decade held a concentration of questionable political and social events. [. . . ] A population raised and educated to be Deaf, Cowards and Heartless."

salamanderKikki Ghezzi's oil on linen entitled "Snow Flake" is featured on the cover of Salamander #45 with a full-color portfolio of more of her works inside the issue. She writes, "My paintings are increments of time and increments of marks and strokes in a meditative moment. They are the time of a walk, the time of process. The kind of 'glow”' time in my paintings is infinite in both directions, outward in accumulated, immeasurable brush strokes and inward towards a glow point."

oneOil on canvas "21 August 2017" by Lynn Boggess invites readers into the December issue One  online poetry magazine, which features a "Second Look" section in which writers discuss poems they admire. This issue's Second Look is Patrick Kavanagh discussing The Great Hunger.

 

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sophie chen kellerThe December 2017 Glimmer Train Bulletin is a fun read this time around, with an eclectic mix of craft essay written from teachers and authors, some of whose works have recently been published in Glimmer Train Stories.

Author of the novel The Luster of Lost Things , Sophie Chen Keller's [pictured] essay, "On Writing from a Child's Perspective for Adults," is a topic I have often tried to better understand as a reviewer assessing others' writing;. This was an instructive perspective to read, as Keller asks, "But how to manage that voice while keeping the novel from becoming a book for younger readers - especially when my inspiration for plot and tone was  those books for younger readers?"

For essays on writing and revision, University of Chicago Professor Will Boast offers his advice on "Cutting Out the Bad Bits," while Andrew Porter, Associate Professor of Creative Writing  at Trinity University in San Antonio writes on "The Long First Draft."

And, in these volatile times, Iranian-American writer Siamak Vossoughi comments on "The Political Lives of Characters," noting the decision writers face: "Political beliefs can matter a lot, in stories and in life, and they can not matter at all. [. . . ] A writer only runs the risk of being preachy or dogmatic if he or she makes a character of one political belief less three-dimensional and human than that of another."

The Glimmer Train Bulletin  is free to read online each month here, or have it delivered monthly to your inbox.

 

 

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leaping clearOne of the cover images, "Lotus Buddha" by Christine DeCamp, for the online publication Leaping Clear is reflective of its mission, to promote "accomplished artists whose work is informed by dedicated meditative and contemplative practices." There is more from DeCamp and other visual artists and writers in the Fall 2017 issue.

river teethThe cover image of the fall 2017 issue of River Teeth: A Journal of Nonfiction Narrative is a gorgeous waterfall photo from White Mountains, N.H. by David FitzSimmons.

concho river reviewTim L. Vasquez of Untamed Photography offers a seemingly surreal image for the cover of the fall/winter 2017 Concho River Review.

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Ruminate Winter 2017 features the 2018 Janet B. McCabe Poetry Prize recipients awarded by judge Shane McCrae:

maggie blake baileyFirst Place
"Elizabeth Asks" by Maggie Blake Bailey
[pictured]

Second Place
"Bookend Quote from Bro. Yao" by Amanda Hawkins

Honorable Mention
'"All These Months Since Your Diagnosis" by Emily Ransdell

Finalists whose works are also included in the issue: Jen Stewart Fueston, Dante Di Stefano, Janine Certo, Mason Henderson, Jake Crist, Jehanne Dubrow, Kerri Vinson Snell, Charity Gingerich, John Sibley Williams, Berwyn Moore, and Mark Wagenaar.

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georgia reviewIt's hard to get the full effect of the Fall 2017 The Georgia Review cover art, which features work by poet and photographer Rachel Eliza Griffiths printed on mirror metallic stock.  A portfolio of her work and essay, "What Has Changed," is included in the issue, with an introduction by Jenny Gropp.

field

An untitled enamel on plywood by Mose " Mose T" Tolliver attracts readers to the Fall 2017 issue of Field: Contemporary Poetry and Poetics.

cincinnati reviewLove love love Mary Jo Karimnia's work, which she describes in her Artist's Statement, "I draw in the backgrounds and enhance certain areas with glass beads. Cropped purposefully to omit faces, the images - such as teenagers in costumes at cosplay conventions, dancers in Bolivia, and Catrina icons at a Day of the Dead festival - emphasize how costumes can allow us to explore alternative personae in an anonymous way, which helps us to learn about our past or to imagine a future in which the acceptance of eccentricities is the norm." The Cincinnati Review Winter 2018 includes her work on the cover as well as a portfolio inside.

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the boiler"Dying of the Already Dead" by Gloria Ceren is featured on the cover of the online fall 2017 issue of The Boiler along with additional works within the publication.

zone threeBilly Renkl's "Watching the Sky #2" collage of antique British chromoolithographs is the cover art for v32 n2 of Zone 3 literary journal. Renkl says of his work, "Vintage and antique paper can be surprisingly beautiful, and I find the way that it carries its history with it moving."

poet loreThe front cover of Fall/Winter 2017 Poet Lore features a photograph of Coyote Bluffs, Arizona by Ariel Body of Live Laugh Design.

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rachel s cordascoSpeculative Fiction in Translation (SFT) "often flies under the radar, despite the fact that it is an important part of the speculative fiction universe," writes author and editor Rachel Cordasco in her introduction to a special section of "Speculative Fiction in Translation By Women" in Anomaly 25. While "SFT has been growing in popularity over the last few years," Cordasco notes that, "like the publishing world as a whole, the world of SFT is often dominated by male authors."

Her selection of included works highlights some of what she feels are the best female authors writing speculative fiction in languages other than English, offering readers a variety of stories and styles. In addition to this, Cordasco started SFinTranslation.com, a site on which she indexes SFT, reviews works, and posts news and interviews relative to SFT. Cordasco herself is working on translating Italian SF.

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