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Denise Hill

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kerry kletterThere's still a lot of summer left and many books titles to enjoy from Sync Audiobooks for Teens free summer program.

Each week, Sync provides two paired titles for free download using Overdrive. The titles include both non-fiction and a wide genre range of fiction. Once the week is over, the titles can no longer be downloaded, but the site has the previous books listed with descriptions so listeners can find the titles via their local library or other audio venue. [Pictured: The First Time She Drowned by Kerry Kletter, one of the titles this week.]

A great way to encourage summer reading for teens, for reluctant readers, and for adults who aren't afraid to cross over! 

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Having served as editor of Kenyon Review since 1994, David Lynn will be stepping down next spring. The publication board, staff and college will be setting a timeline for the application process to consider candidates this upcoming fall or winter. The submission period for this year will be limited as a result of this transition. "In anticipation of a new editor’s arrival, we must maintain space in upcoming issues, so we will be limiting our open period of submissions to September 15-October 1, 2019," writes Alicia Misarti, The Kenyon Review Director of Operations.

Fortunately, Lynn plans to remain active at Kenyon College, as the college president Sean M. Decatur notes, "We’ve already been in conversations on some ideas about other initiatives involving writing and literature for the College."

Our thanks to David Lynn for his years of commitment to the literary community as editor, and our best to all at Kenyon Review during this time of change.

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Creative Nonfiction invites writers to follow @cnfonline on Twitter, then tell a true story in the length of a tweet with #cnftweet to have that writing considered for publication in the "Tiny Truths" section of the print magazine.

karen zeyThe Spring 2019 issue includes fourteen tiny essays on a range of topics including 'caregiving for a parent with dementia' (ChrisGNguyen), finding a single cigarette butt in the driveway every day (GitaCBrown), a family's welcome back "as if no time had passed" (MPMcCune2), going home "in my dreams" (sevans_writer), 'a musician explaining his song title' (ZippyZey aka Karen Zey - pictured), doing the hokey pokey so as not to look a fool (by ridiculoustimes) and memories stirred by listening to the news (mjlevan).

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nina riggsAs previously announced, Cave Wall is fundraising to establish the Nina Riggs Poetry Award. They are sooooo  close to their target amount and are now offering a sweet GIANT RAFFLE to help them reach their goal.

Check out the HUGE list of prizes here. Everyone who donates any amount will be entered in the raffle. A win no matter what!

In discussing the award with me, Cave Wall Editor Rhett Trull offered this beautiful reminiscence:

When Nina got pregnant, she was told by a poetry colleague, "Oh no, here come the motherhood poems." Years later, when I got pregnant, a different colleague told me, "Whatever you do, just don't start writing motherhood poems." We knew they were teasing, but it bothered us. And of course, we ignored it and wrote whatever we wanted to write, whatever we were moved to write. Because that's what we do as poets, all of us: we write toward the heart. I used to hear, all the time, "Don't write poems about grandmothers and dead pets." Well, that's ridiculous. You can write about ANYTHING. Just write it well, write beyond subject and self, toward the greater truths to which all subjects lead us if we let them. At Cave Wall, we've published some beautiful poems about grandmothers and dead pets, once in the same poem and wow, is it a knockout. Anyway, Nina believed all subjects worthy of poetry. And I hope with this award, we can encourage and celebrate writing that mines the everyday for its beauty and truth, as well as writing about relationships and family and, yes, motherhood, too. All of it. All the small and big and wondrous things that connect us, that shine a light on the ordinary revealing that everything is extraordinary if we take a moment to see it.

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American Life in Poetry: Column 739
BY TED KOOSER, U.S. POET LAUREATE

I don't suppose there are many of our younger readers who have started to worry about the possibility of memory loss, but I'd guess almost everybody over fifty does. Peter Schneider lives in Massachusetts and this is from his book Line Fence, from Amherst Writers and Artists Press.

Lost in Plain Sight

Somewhere recently
I lost my short-term memory.
It was there and then it moved
like the flash of a red fox
along a line fence.

My short-term memory
has no address but here
no time but now.
It is a straight-man, waiting to speak
to fill in empty space
with name, date, trivia, punch line.
And then it fails to show.

It is lost, hiding somewhere out back
a dried ragweed stalk on the Kansas Prairie
holding the shadow of its life
against a January wind.

How am I to go on?
I wake up a hundred times a day.
Who am I waiting for
what am I looking for
why do I have this empty cup
on the porch or in the yard?
I greet my neighbor, who smiles.
I turn a slow, lazy Susan
in my mind, looking for
some clue, anything to break the spell
of being lost in plain sight.

We do not accept unsolicited manuscripts. American Life in Poetry is made possible by The Poetry Foundation (www.poetryfoundation.org), publisher of Poetry  magazine. It is also supported by the Department of English at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. Poem copyright ©2006 by Peter Schneider, "Lost in Plain Sight," from Line Fence (Amherst Writers and Artists Press, 2006). Poem reprinted by permission of Peter Schneider and the publisher. Introduction copyright ©2019 by The Poetry Foundation. The introduction’s author, Ted Kooser, served as United States Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress from 2004-2006.

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Each year, The Briar Cliff Review holds a contest for poetry, fiction, and nonfiction with the winners receiving $1000 and publication. The following 2018 winners appear in the most recent issue (31, 2019):

beverly tan murrayPoetry Winner
"I'd hoped to finish this poem before it came true" by Kateri Kosek

Fiction Winner
"Drink It Dry" by Rachel E. Hicks

Nonfiction Winner
"Trauma in Our Country" by Beverly Tan Murray [pictured]

The Briar Cliff Contest is open annually from August 1 - November 1.

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The Spring 2019 issue of The Malahat Review features winning entries from two of their annual contests:

rowanmccandless2018 Constance Rooke Creative Nonfiction Prize
Judge Lynne Van Luven
"Found Objects" by Rowan McCandless [pictured]

2019 Open Season Awards

Poetry
Judge Shane Book
"Timepiece" by Rami Schandall

Fiction
Judge Carmelinda Scian
"Exile" by Janika Oza

Creative Nonfiction
Judge Kyo Maclear
"Letters To My Mother" by Lishai Peel

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scott douglassIn his Spring 2019 "Welcome Readers" section, founder and editor M. Scott Douglass explains his plan to "retire from editing" Main Street Rag.

In making such a proclamation, Douglass comments, "the assumption is that you (I) are/am going out of business. That's not the plan." Having already sold off the production equipment for the publishing arm of MSR, Douglass is moving to the next step: "find a suitable replacement to edit the journal (and possibly books). I'd like to be able to bring this person along slowly, train them in the use of software, deadlines, scheduling, etc., but as soon as you hang a sign that says, 'Looking for new leadership,' again, everyone thinks you're on your deathbed and avoids you."

"We're not dying. I'm not dying. We have no debt, so we're not in financial difficulty." Instead, Douglass notes, after nearly twenty-five years, it's just time for him to focus on his own "muse" and get out from behind the desk to travel more.

"So, if you know someone looking to take over a literary house who's willing to put in some training time, send them my way. There may be a place for them here."

 

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The newest issue of Gulf Coast (31.2) is chock-full of award winning writing!

2018 Barthelme Prize
Judge Laura van den Berg

sarah minorWinner
"Something Clear" by Sarah Minor [pictured]

Honorable Mentions
"Hunger" by Yi Jiang
"Some Weather" by Aliceanna Stopher

2018 Translation Prize in Poetry
Judge Ilya Kaminsky

Co-Winners
"Air Raid" by Polina Barskova, Transl. by Valzhyna Mort
"Colonies of Paradise" by Matthias Göritz, Transl. by Mary Jo Bang

Honorable Mention
"Nobility" by Álvaro Lasso Transl. by Kelsi Vanada

2018 Beauchamp Prize in Critical Art Writing
Judge Wendy Vogel

Winner
“A Long, Dull Shadow: Georg Baselitz’s Legacy of Misogyny” by Maura Callahan, originally published on Momus

Honorable Mentions
“Playing in the Institute: On Tag at the ICA Philadelphia” by C. Klockner
“Intimate Structures: Dorothea Rockburne at Dia: Beacon” Chloe Wyma

For a full list of entries, finalists, links to work, and information about these annual contests, visit Gulf Coast.

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peter stittIn 2016, Peter Stitt, founding editor of The Gettysburg Review, retired as editor-in-chief and Mark Drew stepped into the role. In May 2018, Stitt passed away at age 77.

The Winter 2018 issue features a tribute to Stitt, with contributions from Floyd Collins, Sidney Wade, Philip Schultz, Linda Pastan, Albert Goldbarth, Christopher Howell, Hope Maxwell Snyder, Michael Waters, Rebecca McClanahan, and a closing poem by Peter Stitt, “Winter Search.”

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