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Denise Hill

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The fall issue of Brevity: A Concise Journal of Literary Nonfiction features three new craft essays: "Consider the Prompt" by Dinah Lenney; "When Writing Will Not Make You Free: Resistance Training for Writers" by Judith Pulman; and "On Riding and Writing Boldy" by Monica McFawn. Whle Brevity's nonfiction submissions are capped at 750 "brief" words, these craft essays go well beyond, allowing writers to freely share their advice and give us readers a great deal from which to glean.
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American Life in Poetry: Column 496
BY TED KOOSER, U.S. POET LAUREATE

One of Grant Wood’s earliest paintings is of a pair of old shoes, and it hangs in the art museum in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where Wood grew up. Here’s a different kind of still life, in words, from Jim Daniels, who lives in Pittsburgh. The shoes we put on our feet gradually become like the person wearing them.


Work Boots: Still Life

Next to the screen door
work boots dry in the sun.
Salt lines map the leather
and laces droop
like the arms of a new-hire
waiting to punch out.
The shoe hangs open like the sigh
of someone too tired to speak
a mouth that can almost breathe.
A tear in the leather reveals
a shiny steel toe
a glimpse of the promise of safety
the promise of steel and the years to come.


American Life in Poetry is made possible by The Poetry Foundation (www.poetryfoundation.org), publisher of Poetry magazine. It is also supported by the Department of English at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Poem reprinted from Show and Tell, Univ. of Wisconsin Press, 2003, courtesy of the University of Wisconsin Press. Copyright ©2003 by the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System. Jim Daniels’ most recent book of poems is Birth Marks, BOA Editions, Ltd., 2013. Introduction copyright © 2014 by The Poetry Foundation. The introduction's author, Ted Kooser, served as United States Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress from 2004-2006. We do not accept unsolicited manuscripts.
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Glimmer Train has just chosen the winning stories for their Very Short Fiction Award. This competition is held quarterly and is open to all writers for stories with a word count under 3000. The next Very Short Fiction competition will take place in October. Glimmer Train’s monthly submission calendar may be viewed here.

Luchette cred Kate Van BrocklinFirst place: Claire Luchette, of Brooklyn, NY, wins $1500 for “Full.” Her story will be published in Issue 95 of Glimmer Train Stories. [Pictured; Photo by Kate Van Brocklin]

Second place: Omid Fallahazad, of Framingham, MA, wins $500 for “Arrested.” His story will also be published in an upcoming issue, increasing his prize to $700.

Third place: Louise Blecher Rose, of New York, NY, wins $300 for “Deux Ex Machina.”

A PDF of the Top 25 winners can be found here.

Deadline coming up! Family Matters: September 30 Glimmer Train hosts this competition twice a year, and first place has been increased to $1500 plus publication in the journal. It’s open to all writers for stories about families of all configurations. Most submissions to this category run 1200-5000 words, but can go up to 12,000. Click here for complete guidelines.

New Book from Jesse Glass

September 30, 2014
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jesse glassBased on a widely celebrated case of senteenth century lycanthropy and embodying the Sadean idea of literature as a crime unlimited by time, space, and circumstance, The Life and Death of Peter Stubbe was From Knives Forks and Spoons Press comes Selections from The Life & Death of Peter Stubbe by Jesse Glass. From the publisher: "Based on a widely celebrated case of seventeenth century lycanthropy and embodying the Sadean idea of literature as a crime unlimed by time, space and circumstance, The Life and Death of Peter Stubbe was originally composed from 1980 to 1985 and published in a fine-press, limited edition by Birch Brook Press in 1995. . . In 2012, Glass returned to the manuscript, excerpted from it, and illuminated the redacted text using gouache, pencil, pen and ink, and the result. . . is a further added dimension to the original exploration of metaphysical violence, social chaos, night, and the autonomous nature of language."
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Zymbol magazine was started in 2012 as a publication which joined art and literature inspired by symbolism and surrealism. In the short time they have been publishing, they've shared the work of artists and writers from over 20 countries, some of whom have gone on to publish award-winning books, opened solo shows, and speak at various conferences and festivals.

Now Zymbol is fundraising to support printing their publication, including some full-color issues, distributing copies to students and contributors. releasing eBook versions and free content on their website, and hosting free literary events a various festivals.

If they exceed their fundraising goals, Zymbol will co-sponsor awards for young artists & writers to further their craft through education, artist residencies, and exhibitions/publications.

kimonoLike a lot of fundraisers, you get cool stuff for various levels of support, including this limited edition fine art poster print, "Kimono," by Susanne Iles - at just the $25 level. In addition to supporting a great literary/art organization, this seems a great bonus!
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American Life in Poetry: Column 495
BY TED KOOSER, U.S. POET LAUREATE

We’re at the end of the gardening season here on the Great Plains, and the garden described in this poem by Karina Borowicz, who lives in Massachusetts, is familiar to tomato fanciers all across the country.


September Tomatoes

The whiskey stink of rot has settled
in the garden, and a burst of fruit flies rises
when I touch the dying tomato plants.
Still, the claws of tiny yellow blossoms
flail in the air as I pull the vines up by the roots
and toss them in the compost.
It feels cruel. Something in me isn’t ready
to let go of summer so easily. To destroy
what I’ve carefully cultivated all these months.
Those pale flowers might still have time to fruit.
My great-grandmother sang with the girls of her village
as they pulled the flax. Songs so old
and so tied to the season that the very sound
seemed to turn the weather.


American Life in Poetry is made possible by The Poetry Foundation (www.poetryfoundation.org), publisher of Poetry magazine. It is also supported by the Department of English at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Poem copyright © 2013 by Karina Borowicz, whose most recent book of poems is Proof, (Codhill Press, 2014). Poem first appeared in the journal ECOTONE and is reprinted by permission of Karina Borowicz and the publisher. Introduction copyright © 2014 by The Poetry Foundation. The introduction's author, Ted Kooser, served as United States Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress from 2004-2006. We do not accept unsolicited manuscripts.

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Another commntary of interest from Psychology Today, this time from reporter and storyteller Greg O'Brien whose memoir ON PLUTO: Inside the Mind of Alzheimer's is out this September from Codfish Press. O'Brien uses the Black Dog from literature - engaging refrences to Robert Bly, Homer, Apollonius of Tyana, Robert Lewis Stevenson, Winston Churchill - as a means of exploring the "demons of depression." O'Brien writes about the misunderstandings of what depression means: "It is not a mood swing, a lack of coping skills, character flaws, or simply a sucky day, a month or a year; it’s a horrific, often deadly, disease. . . In depression, there is no off button."

O'Brien's book is also the subject of the short film, A Place Called Pluto, directed by award-winning filmmaker Steve James. In 2009, he was diagnosed with Early Onset Alzheimer's. His maternal grandfather and his mother died of the disease. O'Brien also carries a marker gene for Alzheimer's.
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meridian

Geogrpahic Tongues
is a photo series by Elisabeth Hogeman featured both on the cover and the inside of Issue 33 of Merdian. And yes, it's really tongues. And yes, they really are quite lovely.

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slipstream 34

Aptly entitled "Rust," this image by nyk fury sets the theme for issue 34 of Slipstream: Rust, Dust, Lust.
 
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room

Room
's cover art by mixed media artist Sandra Chevrier is a beautiful expression of this issue's theme "Geek Girls" (37.3). The piece is "La Cage aux fenêtres laissant entrées un soleil déja mort" (2013).
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Structo12coverPlainThe most recent issue of Structo features an interview with Margaret Atwood that took place in London after she gave the annual Sebald Lecture at the British Library. Interviewer Euan Monaghan follows up on the talk, entitled "Atwood in Translationland," in which Atwood spoke on the "many kinds of translations" she has lived through in her life as well as her work creating a challenge for translators. Atwood and Monaghan also discuss play writing, the use of genre labels on Atwood's writing (touching on LeGuin, Bruce Sterling, and slipstream), and of course, the process of writing. Twenty pages in all, this interview is no light fare.

Structo specializes in the true, conversation interview, and three months after publication, makes the interviews available on their web site. There now you can find interviews with Richard Adams, Iain Banks, David Constantine, Lindsey Davis, Stella Duffy, Steven Hall, Inez Lynn & Aimée Heuzenroeder, Ian R. MacLeod, Chris Meade, Kim Stanley Robinson, Sarah Thomas, Katie Waldegrave, and Evie Wyld.
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idaho-review-v14-2014Awards and recognitions abound for the Idaho Review: Nicole Cullen’s short story, “Long Tom Lookout,” which appeared in our 2013 issue, has been selected for reprint in The Best American Short Stories 2014, edited by Jennifer Egan. “How She Remembers It” by Rick Bass, also from the 2013 issue, will be appearing in The Pushcart Prize 2015.

The newest issue features the Idaho Review 2014 Editor's Prize, "Tough Love" by Janet Peery.
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