NewPages.com is news, information, and guides to literary magazines, independent publishers, creative writing programs, alternative periodicals, indie bookstores, writing contests, and more.

Denise Hill

Written by

siamak vossoughiGlimmer Train March 2019 Bulletin offers an interesting selection of craft essays, each just at a tipping point of controversy.

"Words, and Barry Hannah, the Guy Who Taught Me to Love Them" by Marian Palaia shares how Hannah's voice and vernacular influenced her early on, although now she comments, "if Barry were writing the same stuff now, I can't imagine how he'd get away with it."

Devin Murphy's "We All Do It! Don't We? The Art of Reading Like a Thief" examines the fine line of "Did I plagiarize the novel I'd read?" He comments on his own teaching and trying to help student writers "understand the value of actively reading for material that will help them deepen their own stories."

"What interests me about politics in fiction," writes Siamak Vossoughi [pictured], "is how it informs the lives of characters." In his essay, 'The Political Lives of Characters," he asserts, "A writer only runs the risk of being preachy or dogmatic if he or she makes a character of one political belief less three-dimensional and human than that of another."

 

Written by

rypaSubscribers to Rattle poetry magazine get bonus in their mailbox with each spring issue: Rattle Young Poets Anthology. If you're not a subscriber, RYPA can be ordered separately for just $6.

The 2019 issue is a 48-page chapbook of work by twenty poets age fifteen or under, but don't let the age line fool you. Rattle editors write that this "is not a collection just for kids—these are missives to adults from the next generation, confronting big topics with fresh eyes and a child-like spontaneity."

Contributors include Lucia Baca, Angélica Borrego, Olivia Bourke, April Chukwueke, Lexi Duarte, Josephina Green, C.A. Harper, Lily Hicks, Angelique Jean Lindberg, Rylee McNiff, Ethan Paulk, Lydia Phelps, McKenzie Renfrew, Ellie Shumaker, Emmy Song, Rowan Stephenson, Saoirse Stice, Zachary Tsokos, Layla Varty, and Simon Zuckert, with cover art by Noralyn Lucero.

Submission deadline for the next issue is October 15, 2019.

Written by

scholastic news kidsScholastic News Kids Press Corps, a team of Kid Reporters from across the country and around the world that covers “news for kids, by kids” is taking applications. Students ages 10–14 with a passion for telling great stories and discussing issues that matter most to kids are encouraged to apply for the 2019–2020 school year. All applications must be received by May 31, 2019.

Kid Reporters gain valuable writing and critical-thinking skills in addition to hands-on journalism experience through their work covering local and national current events, and interviewing news-makers. Their stories are published online at the Scholastic News Kids Press Corps website, as well as in issues of Scholastic Classroom Magazines, which reach more than 25 million students in the United States.

Past Kid Reporters have interviewed notable figures, including:

• Anderson Cooper, CNN news anchor
• Marian Wright Edelman, President and Founder of the Children’s Defense Fund
• Dav Pilkey, creator of the best-selling Dog Man and Captain Underpants series
• Sonia Sotomayor, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States
• James Corden, host of the Late Late Show on CBS

[From Royivia Ferguson, Publicist, Corporate Communications at Scholastic]

Written by

nationalpoetrymonthposter2019The Academy of American Poets offers a plethora of FREE resources for celebrating National Poetry Month!

Of course, there's the iconic poster, this year featuring artwork by Julia Wang, a high school student from San Jose California, who won the inaugural poster contest. You can download the poster as well as order a free paper copy while supplies last.

April 18 is Poem in Your Pocket Day - carry around a poem (or two or three) in your pocket to share by reading to people throughout the day. The Academy offers a selection of pocket-sized poems to download and carry.

Dear Poet is a multimedia education project for youth in grades five through twelve who can write letters in response to poems they read. Teachers are provided a full curriculum which aligns with Common Core.

In addition to all of this, Poets.org has a full page of programming resources for teachers, readers, writers, students, and librarians. That pretty much means for all of us! So check it out and get geared up!

Written by

copper nickel 28

I'm struck by patterns this week, starting with the unique pose in Xaviera Simmons' "Arie at the Wall" on the cover of Copper Nickel issue 28.

cimarron review fall 2018

The cover photo, "A Couch with a View," by Dallas Crow on the Fall 2018 issue of Cimarron Review is both subtle and inviting.

Issue 11 Cover

Less subtle and as equally intriguing is the cover art on issue 11.1 of Into the Void, "Stray" by Danielle Klebes.

 

 

Written by

Winners of The MacGuffin's 23rd Poet Hunt Contest along with commentary from guest judge Alberto Álvaro Ríos are featured in the Winter 2019 issue.

matthew spirengFirst Place
"Ed" by Matthew Spireng [pictured]

Honorable Mention
"Venetian Passageway" by Judith Rosenberg

This annual contest awards $500 and publication for first place and publication for up to two honorable mentions. 

Written by

alison lutermanSince there is always a lag time created between contemporary news issues and publications of poetry, Rattle has created a quick-streaming solution.

Poets Respond takes weekly submissions (before midnight on Fridays) for works "written within the last week about a public event that occurred within the last week."

The poems then appear every Sunday on the Rattle homepage. The only criteria for the poem, the editors assert, is quality, "all opinions and reactions are welcome."

Selected poets receive $50, with poems sent before midnight on Sunday and Tuesday considered for a "bonus" mid-week post.

This week's selection is "In Defense of Those Who Harbor Terrible Ideas at Tax Time" by Alison Luterman [pictured], in which, yes, she considers "the young black gay actor who orchestrated / a fake hate crime against himself. / It must have seemed like such a good idea to him / at the time," and later in the poem offers, "I have to forgive this young man his terrible / idea, I have to because, in my own way, I’ve been him." 

For more information about Poets Respond and an archive of past works, click here.

Written by

 The Art of Protest: Art and Scholarship as Political Resistance is the theme for the 2019 Mayapple & Sarah Lawrence Summer Workshop, June 13-22 in Bronxville, New York.

Mayapple Center for the Arts and Humanities will host workshops focused on participants choice of activist art, and the daily schedule will include restorative and affirmative yoga and mediation practices in nature.

Courses include:

  • mahagony l brownEngaging Civically through Collaborative Art: Developing a Working Aesthetics of Protest Art with Michelle Slater
  • Staging the Revolution: Protest, Performance, and Social Change with Dana Edell
  • Writing and Exploring Songs that Matter to Us and the World with Dar Williams
  • Writing and Social Action: The Power of the Personal Voice in a Polical World with Brian Morton
  • Ekphrastic Politics with Mahogany L. Brown [pictured]
  • Art and Activism: Creative Collaborations in the Public Sphere with David Birkin

Enrollment is limited and applicants must provide an explanation of their interest as well as a sample of their work. Some financial assistance is avaialable.

 

Written by

ecotone body issue"Oh, plastic, scourge of the Anthropocene, shaped into adorable shapes and dyed multifarious colors; plastic, who will be with us forever: it’s easy to forget about you, but when I remember you’re here, I’m annoyed and freaked out all at once."

The opening line of From the Editor: Material Life by Anna Lena Phillips Bell creates a link between the theme for the Fall/Winter 2018 issue of Ecotone: Body and our cultural abuse of plastics. Taking their own use to task, Ecotone announces with this issue they will no longer be shipping the magazines in 'polybags,' and the cover of the publication itself will now be an uncoated stock. Walking the talk!

And the contents of the publication focus on "The Body" including campus-carry laws, Indigenous students, the safety of women's bodies, queer identity, birth and postpartum depression, and much more.

See a full list of contributors and read partial content here.

Written by

main street rag

This lovely cover of The Main Street Rag Winter 2019 just about sums it up for us here in Michigan.

carve winter 2019

Keeping with the winter theme, work by Justin Burks of Birdhouse Branding captivates viewers with this Winter 2019 cover of Carve.

missouri review winter 2018

It took me a moment to get this one on the Winter 2018 cover of The Missouri Review, but LOL when I did. "Comet's Peeping Tom" comes from the Plastic Life  series by Vincent Bousserez.

newpages-footer-logo

We welcome any/all Feedback.