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Denise Hill

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The Spring 2019 issue of The Malahat Review features winning entries from two of their annual contests:

rowanmccandless2018 Constance Rooke Creative Nonfiction Prize
Judge Lynne Van Luven
"Found Objects" by Rowan McCandless [pictured]

2019 Open Season Awards

Poetry
Judge Shane Book
"Timepiece" by Rami Schandall

Fiction
Judge Carmelinda Scian
"Exile" by Janika Oza

Creative Nonfiction
Judge Kyo Maclear
"Letters To My Mother" by Lishai Peel

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scott douglassIn his Spring 2019 "Welcome Readers" section, founder and editor M. Scott Douglass explains his plan to "retire from editing" Main Street Rag.

In making such a proclamation, Douglass comments, "the assumption is that you (I) are/am going out of business. That's not the plan." Having already sold off the production equipment for the publishing arm of MSR, Douglass is moving to the next step: "find a suitable replacement to edit the journal (and possibly books). I'd like to be able to bring this person along slowly, train them in the use of software, deadlines, scheduling, etc., but as soon as you hang a sign that says, 'Looking for new leadership,' again, everyone thinks you're on your deathbed and avoids you."

"We're not dying. I'm not dying. We have no debt, so we're not in financial difficulty." Instead, Douglass notes, after nearly twenty-five years, it's just time for him to focus on his own "muse" and get out from behind the desk to travel more.

"So, if you know someone looking to take over a literary house who's willing to put in some training time, send them my way. There may be a place for them here."

 

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The newest issue of Gulf Coast (31.2) is chock-full of award winning writing!

2018 Barthelme Prize
Judge Laura van den Berg

sarah minorWinner
"Something Clear" by Sarah Minor [pictured]

Honorable Mentions
"Hunger" by Yi Jiang
"Some Weather" by Aliceanna Stopher

2018 Translation Prize in Poetry
Judge Ilya Kaminsky

Co-Winners
"Air Raid" by Polina Barskova, Transl. by Valzhyna Mort
"Colonies of Paradise" by Matthias Göritz, Transl. by Mary Jo Bang

Honorable Mention
"Nobility" by Álvaro Lasso Transl. by Kelsi Vanada

2018 Beauchamp Prize in Critical Art Writing
Judge Wendy Vogel

Winner
“A Long, Dull Shadow: Georg Baselitz’s Legacy of Misogyny” by Maura Callahan, originally published on Momus

Honorable Mentions
“Playing in the Institute: On Tag at the ICA Philadelphia” by C. Klockner
“Intimate Structures: Dorothea Rockburne at Dia: Beacon” Chloe Wyma

For a full list of entries, finalists, links to work, and information about these annual contests, visit Gulf Coast.

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peter stittIn 2016, Peter Stitt, founding editor of The Gettysburg Review, retired as editor-in-chief and Mark Drew stepped into the role. In May 2018, Stitt passed away at age 77.

The Winter 2018 issue features a tribute to Stitt, with contributions from Floyd Collins, Sidney Wade, Philip Schultz, Linda Pastan, Albert Goldbarth, Christopher Howell, Hope Maxwell Snyder, Michael Waters, Rebecca McClanahan, and a closing poem by Peter Stitt, “Winter Search.”

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commonIssue No. 17 of The Common includes a special portfolio of stories from Syria, with works by Luqman Derki (Trans. Jonathan Wright), Shahla Al-Ujayli (Trans. Alice Guthrie), Mohammad Ibrahim Nawaya (Trans. Robin Moger), Raw’a Sunbul (Trans. Alice Guthrie), Haidar Haidar (Trans. Jonathan Wright), Odai Al Zoubi (Trans. Robin Moger), Colette Bahna (Trans. Robin Moger), and Ibrahim Samuel (Trans. Maia Tabet), as well as artwork from Syria, courtesy of the Hindiyeh Museum of Art.

The Common website features full content online as well as a supercool interactive map [pictured] of the issue - click on the geographical marker and get a photo and link to the content.

For teachers: The Common offers supplementary teaching materials for each issue. A classroom subscription includes two issues for every student and an in-person or Skype visit from Editor in Chief Jennifer Acker or a participating author.

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kenyon reviewKenyon Review Editor David Baker opens the May/June 2019 issue with his commentary on the annual "Nature's Nature" theme. In response to our having witnessed "the Trump administration take further steps to release two hundred thousand more acres of public land—this time in Utah along the Canyonlands and the Green River—to 'development,'" Baker notes that "Greed, stupidity, and fever for power are not new to our country or even our species—read Shakespeare, Dante, Homer—but the velocity of unfixable damages and the extent of losses are without precedent."

Baker asks, "Are we one or two generations away from the point of no return for environmental stability? Is ours the last generation with hope of preventing or slowing a massive disaster? Is it too late? The calculations come every week, with variables, but the constant alarm is the same."

This is what compelled him, he recounts, "to curate a special feature on ecology and poetry . . . I wanted to showcase new poems that resisted such forms of power and that named one by one the spectacular, beautiful, and often endangered citizens of the natural world."

Now an annual issue, the writers featured each year are purposefully diverse in that the publication does not choose the same authors to appear more than once. The compilation features twenty-seven new poems, one essay, and two portfolios of artwork. For a full list of content with some selections available to read online, visit the Kenyon Review.

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Winning entries for the 2018 Ginsberg Poetry Award are featured in the 2019 issue of Patterson Literary Review.

jim reeseFirst Prize $1000
“Dancing Room Only”
Jim Reese [pictured], Yankton, SD

Second Prize $200
“Cu Tantu Si Cala ‘U Culu Si Para”
Maria Fama, Philadelphia, PA

Third Prize $100
“New Suit”
Lorraine Conlin, Wantagh, NY

A full list of Honorable Mention and Editor's Choice recipients can be seen here.

The Alan Ginsberg Poetry Award for 2019 has closed, but submissions are open for the 2020 award.

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gabe montesantiWinner of Boulevard's 2018 Nonfiction Contest for Emerging Writers, Gabe Montesanti's essay "The Worldwide Roller Derby Convention" is featured in the Spring 2019 issue (#101/102). Montesanti lives in St. Louis where she skates for the local team, Arch Rival, under the name Joan of Spark.

In a commentary about her work, she says, "'The Worldwide Roller Derby Convention' became the final chapter of my MFA thesis at Washington University in St. Louis, and is now the final chapter of my full-length memoir about derby. This essay unlocked the whole project for me, in a way. Recognizing the themes of physicality and queerness led me to draw new parallels between roller derby and my unconventional and often violent upbringing. Having a vision of the end also gave me direction—a place I could write toward."

The 2019 Nonfiction Contest for Emerging Writers opens June 2, 2019. The winner receives $1000 and publication.

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waltA great idea to celebrate the 200th birthday of Walt Whitman,The Poetry Motel Foundation and the Hudson Valley Writers Guild will hold a public reading of "Song of Myself" on May 31 at the Robert Burns Statue, Washington Park, Albany, NY. 

If you're in the area, they are looking for readers to help manage some of the 1300 lines in 52 sections. For those not nearby - perhaps arranging a public reading in your own town would be a wonderful commemoration of the poet in keeping with "most of Whitman’s work . . . [a] celebration of the individual, of the nation, and of the spiritual possibility within us all."

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zone 3“Mixed Drinks” in Zone 3 Spring 2019 is one of many collaborative works by Brenda Miller and Julie Marie Wade, erasing their cross country divide to create a memoir which blends (no pun intended) a list of drinks with associated memories from childhood (Shirley Temple) through adolescence (Bloody Mary), college years (Old Fashioned) to adulthood (Cosmopolitan). Recipes included.

Told in the second person, each vignette contains vivid pop culture details of the time, relatable to many, as well as a conflicting set of feelings the speaker must overcome – between what is expected by others, what is expected of ourselves, and what we are able to finally experience and deliver. “You know that the beer and the hamburger will provide you at least five minutes of purpose in this bar where you don’t belong, and that you’ll walk home afterward in the dwindling light of autumn, along the river, to your sparsely furnished studio apartment, where you’ll feel both lonely and relieved.”

The end of the piece didn't feel finished, but rather the start of something larger, yet unattached. This might seem a fault if it didn’t at the same time feel so polished. An interview with the two writers cleared this up. Wade comments on their collaborative style, “We don’t really know what’s going to happen or emerge, in terms of the content or the final form, until we reach an ending – and even these endings feel more like stopping points or plateaus in our momentum rather than definitive conclusions.”

For more on collaborative writing, including another by Miller and Wade, Jet Fuel Review #17 (Spring 2019) features a Collaborative Works Special Section: “These selections embody the magic that arises out of collaboration and the bringing together of separate voices and identities to craft a singular, resonant body of work.”

Review by Denise Hill

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