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Book Reviews by Title - W (81)

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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by George Bilgere
  • Date Published January 2010
  • ISBN-13 978-1932870350
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 80pp
  • Price $14.95
  • Review by Renee Emerson
The White Museum is written in the casual, chatty style similar to that of Billy Collins. Bilgere has a dry sense of humor that simultaneously pokes fun and is hyper-aware of his standing as a white, middle-aged man. Like Collins, his humor often takes a turn into the dirty-old-man realm, referring to “the girls” “trying out their newfangled breasts” in “Solstice,” and his “star[ing] at the breasts / of that sixteen-year-old girl / in the sky-colored bikini. Touching them / would mean the electric chair, / but still…” in “Americana.”
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  • Book Type Novel
  • by Ami Sands Brodoff
  • Date Published October 2008
  • ISBN-13 978-1897187494
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 302pp
  • Price $18.95
  • Review by Christina Hall
You could say this is a novel about the Holocaust. You could say this is a story about secrets and the past, control and acceptance, love and emptiness. And The White Space Between is all these things, but, above all else, Ami Sands Brodoff has crafted a tale of ancestry and the familial bond.
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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by David Brennan
  • Date Published February 2010
  • ISBN-13 978-1935402756
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 87pp
  • Price $16.00
  • Review by Jeremy Benson
I was reading The White Visitation in the Detroit International Airport, waiting for my flight to Charleston, when the Iraqi gentleman on my left nudged my arm. “Is that the bible?” he asked.
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  • Book Type Ed.
  • by Owen King and John McNally
  • Date Published July 2008
  • ISBN-13 978-1416566441
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 432pp
  • Price $16.00
  • Review by Matt Bell
Who Can Save Us Now? is a collection of twenty-two short stories that each provide a new take on superhero lore, twisting and turning genre conventions on their head in the hopes of providing a new experience within the framework of the short story. Editors Owen King and John McNally use the book's introduction to reflect on the difference between our world and the one that provided the more black-and-white conflicts of the Golden Age of comic books, setting the stage for tales of new superheroes "whose amazing abilities reflect and address our strange and confusing new conditions," specifically the more modern terrors of "suicide bombers, dwindling oil reserves, global warming, and an international community in complete disrepair."
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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by David Lazar
  • Date Published May 2016
  • ISBN-13 978-0-9903221-1-5
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 72pp
  • Price $15.00
  • Review by Valerie Wieland
Check out your favorite bookstore in May. That’s when Who’s Afraid of Helen of Troy: An Essay on Love by David Lazar will be available, and it’s one fun book. Though it’s subtitled an essay, his ninth book is written in a series of short prose poems that mesh bits of autobiography with strong portions of mythology and dreams, accented with songs and movies.
  • Subtitle Essays Mostly About Poetry
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  • Book Type Nonfiction
  • by Lawrence Raab
  • Date Published December 2016
  • ISBN-13 978-1-936797-76-9
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 188pp
  • Price $16.95
  • Review by Valerie Wieland

Lawrence Raab poses the question Why Don’t We Say What We Mean? as the title of his newest book. To answer the question, he dissects various poems and comments on their authors. The title was pulled from a 1931 essay by Robert Frost called “Education by Poetry: A Meditative Monologue.” Frost wrote: “People say, ‘Why don’t you say what you mean?’ We never do that, do we, being all of us too much poets.”

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  • Book Type Stories
  • by Ron MacLean
  • Date Published August 2008
  • ISBN-13 978-0974428857
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 210pp
  • Price $15.00
  • Review by Cynthia Reeser
Ron MacLean, author of the 2004 novel Blue Winnetka Skies, surges forward with his new collection of short stories, Why the Long Face? The collection’s witty, and at times wry, take on the ordinary stuff of life works to subtly reveal the extraordinary nature hidden in even the most common events.
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  • Book Type Nonfiction
  • by Andy Singer
  • Date Published August 2013
  • ISBN-13 978-1-62106-486-2
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 160pp
  • Price $13.95
  • Review by Elizabeth O'Brien
Microcosm Publishing’s Why We Drive: The Past, Present, and Future of Automobiles in America is an image-rich examination of the dominance of car culture in the United States. “I am an advocate for car-free cities, car-free city sections, and car-free living,” author/illustrator Andy Singer states within the first few introductory pages. The text proceeds from there, detailing the disadvantages of arranging urban and suburban life around cars rather than people. This is followed by a succinct history of highway politics in the United States, and Singer concludes with a call to action, offering suggestions for individuals who wish to live car-free and strategies for funneling more money into public transportation at the state level.
  • Subtitle (& Other Poems)
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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Jeanne Larsen
  • Date Published October 2010
  • ISBN-13 978-0932412-959
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 74pp
  • Price $14.95
  • Review by Renee Emerson
Why We Make Gardens, Jeanne Larsen’s second book of poetry, is divided into five sections: “Elementals,” “Generations,” “That Green Expiring Close,” “Annihilating All That’s Made,” and “Pleasance.” Each poem incorporates the word “garden” in the title in some way—some are more metaphysical, such as “Garden of Bitterness,” and some are more literal, such as “Garden After Winter’s First Storm.” The book is unified through this theme of gardens, yet Larsen’s finely tuned sensibilities never allow the poems to fall into redundancy.
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  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Janet Lewis
  • Date Published August 2013
  • ISBN-13 9780804011433
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 112pp
  • Price $9.95
  • Review by Patricia Contino
Life choices were nonexistent for Bertrande Guerre (née Rols) in sixteenth century France. Her marriage to Martin was arranged between their wealthy peasant families when they both reached puberty. A distant husband, Martin grudgingly comes to respect Bertrande when she sides with him against his cruel father. To prove her love, she covers for Martin when he runs away. “Eight days” turns into eight years, and Martin returns a changed man . . . that is, if it really is him . . .
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