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Book Reviews by Title - T (87)

  • Subtitle Histories
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  • Book Type Stories
  • by Jo Carson
  • Date Published April 2007
  • ISBN-13 978-0821417546
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 138pp
  • Price $29.95
  • Review by Donna J. Essner
In the tradition of Southern oral storytelling style, Jo Carson writes her stories for telling aloud. Teller Tales: Histories, her newest book, carries on this almost lost art of speaking and of handing down the history created by previous generations. According to Carson, both stories, “What Sweet Lips Can Do,” and “Men of Their Time,” were originally written to be performed. Unlike many other traditional texts that recount American historical events, Teller Tales is a narration, a performance of two stories wrapped around the American Revolutionary War. Neither monotonous nor mundane, Teller Tales reads as if the narrators are standing on a stage, talking, reminiscing, throwing laughable tidbits, and handing down what they know about the events that helped shape the America we know today.
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  • Book Type Nonfiction
  • by Deborah J. Swiss
  • Date Published November 2011
  • ISBN-13 978-0425243077
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 384pp
  • Price $16.00
  • Review by Lydia Pyne
In the late eighteenth- through mid-nineteenth centuries, the British Empire exiled close to 162,000 men, women, and children under the Transportation Act to serve their prison sentences in Australia—simultaneously ridding Britain of an overcrowded prison population and providing the Empire with expendable colonists.
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  • Book Type Nonfiction Anthology Edited
  • by J.L. Powers
  • Date Published September 2012
  • ISBN-13 978-1-935955-22-1
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 300pp
  • Price $16.95
  • Review by Denise Hill
That Mad Game: Growing Up in a Warzone is a collection of personal essays from adults who survived childhood in various warzones around the globe. As much as this is a collection of stories about the atrocities of war, it is also, and maybe even more so, a collection of stories of hope for peace. Alia Yunis, in his examination of the Israel-Palestine conflict, comments: “A child can flee the war . . . or the war can stop. But in most cases, children become the adult voices in the background soundtrack of a new generation’s war.”
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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Mary Ruefle
  • Date Published October 2013
  • ISBN-13 978-1-933517-73-5
  • Format Hardcover
  • Pages 136pp
  • Price $22.00
  • Review by Elizabeth O'Brien
“What is the code for happiness?” Mary Ruefle asks in “Trances of the Blast,” a poem that comes midway through her book of the same title, but is as good a place as any to begin:
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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Albert Mobilio
  • Date Published January 2011
  • ISBN-13 978-1-934029-16-9
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 88pp
  • Price $14.00
  • Review by Sima Rabinowitz
onlineropositions written broken-english wise,” the poet writes in “Average Reader,” a phrase that embodies this book’s essence and which characterizes what is most appealing about it, original syntax, a unique sense of what can be “english-wise.” Perhaps the poet imagines that this unique language is precisely what we need to survive: “you want to be saved,” Mobilio insists in the collection’s opening poem, “Touch Wood.” And how could we not be saved by such lines as “we lay down housed,” reminding us of the human capacity for invention, for creativity.
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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by LaTasha N. Nevada Diggs
  • Date Published April 2013
  • ISBN-13 978-0-9885399-0-7
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 98pp
  • Price $15.00
  • Review by Aimee Nicole
Latasha Diggs is a writer you have to experience, not read. Twerk isn’t a book to toss into the back seat of your car “for later” or a read-a-poem-here-and-there collection. With each verse, she sparks your curiosity and lures you deeper and deeper with her unique craft.
  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Jon Pineda
  • Date Published March 2008
  • ISBN-13 978-1930974753
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 57pp
  • Price $14.00
  • Review by Laura Eve Engel
The cover of Jon Pineda’s second collection, The Translator’s Diary, which depicts a graceful and nebulous spiral, is eerily reflective of the poems it obscures. Pineda’s poems turn in on themselves, each a pointed and intimate introspection sheathed in the gauze of the lyric, accruing momentum in a sort of ripple effect as the book progresses.
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  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Milen Ruskov
  • Translated From Bulgarian
  • by Angela Rodel
  • Date Published November 2011
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 294pp
  • Price $15.95
  • Review by Wendy Breuer
Novels that focus on contemporary foibles are often flattened in time by the ephemeral. In Thrown into Nature, Bulgarian writer Milen Ruskov sidesteps the obsolescence problem by giving us a picaresque novel set in sixteenth century Spain. Guimarães da Silva, acolyte and student, narrates his adventures with his mentor, Dr. Monardes, a true figure out of history, the "discoverer" and promoter of tobacco as the cure for whatever ails you.
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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Sabrina Orah Mark
  • Date Published October 2009
  • ISBN-13 978-0-9818591-2-5
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 65pp
  • Price $14.00
  • Review by Roy Wang
Tsim Tsum derives its title from an idea in Kabbalah that a being cannot truly exist unless the creator departs from his creation. This must refer to the fact that the two main characters, Walter B. and Beatrice, seem like abandoned children left to find their way through a fairy-tale landscape of allegorical friends and props. Rather, the spirit must have left them and their world midway through creation, as both characters have just enough intelligence to be confused. This is the central dilemma of Tsim Tsum.
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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Farid Matuk
  • Date Published November 2010
  • ISBN-13 978-0-9815-2275-3
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 138pp
  • Price $14.00
  • Review by C.J. Opperthauser
Farid Matuk's long book of poems from Letter Machine Editions is memorable and unique. Many of the poems deal with Matuk's status as an immigrant from Peru, and the life that accompanies it. But it is not done with any agenda. It's a beautiful, oddly paced look at this world which non-immigrants may not understand. One clear look at this is in a poem aptly titled “Immigrants”:
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