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Book Reviews by Title - T (87)

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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Heather Christle
  • Date Published July 2011
  • ISBN-13 978-0980193879
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 72pp
  • Price $12.00
  • Review by J. A. Tyler
The Trees The Trees, the second poetry collection from Heather Christle, is a loosely-knit collection of poems that sometimes has to do with trees, that often has to do with the dichotomy of relationships, and that always has an overwhelmingly and wonderfully infectious use of rhythm:
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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Michael Teig
  • Date Published November 2013
  • ISBN-13 978-1-938160-20-2
  • Format Paperback
  • Price $16.00
  • Review by Elizabeth O'Brien
Michael Teig’s second poetry collection, There’s a Box in the Garage You Can Beat with a Stick, is a romping book, full of syntactic (and synaptic) leaps. Organized in three parts, two of which begin with meditations on the possibilities of boxes, these poems hint at a diverse poetic lineage, possibly including James Tate, the New York School poets, and Sombrero Fallout-era Richard Brautigan. Teig finds occasion for poetry in chickens and waltzes and monkeys and hats, and the speaker addresses readers in a casual, friendly mode. The diction of the poems ranges from officious to fanciful, sometimes in the same intake of breath, which is at times both confusing and exhilarating.
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  • Book Type Nonfiction
  • by Mark Stephen Meadows
  • Date Published May 2010
  • ISBN-13 978-1-59376-275-9
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 304pp
  • Price $14.95
  • Review by Ann Beman
I recently became aware of the term personal watermelon. This is a smaller melon than your picnic-for-ten variety, weighing in at 5 lbs or less. Briefly, I entertained the false notion that the term meant the sweet, quenching fruit was mine mine mine and no one’s but. “Personal Watermelons. Get them here.” I’ve been reading about the seedless orbs a lot lately. They seem to be in season; it’s their time. Much like terrorism and terrorist were – and continue to be – ripe terms following September 11, 2001. On that date, artist, software designer, and global hitchhiker Mark Stephen Meadows found himself stranded in Paris, unable to fly home to California as planned on September 12.
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  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Goldie Goldbloom
  • Date Published February 2010
  • ISBN-13 9781930974883
  • Format Hardcover
  • Pages 321pp
  • Price $26.00
  • Review by Alex Myers
An albino woman, a dwarf named Toad, and two Italian prisoners of war on a rabbit-ridden farm in the nether reaches of Australia: what could be a better premise for a novel? Setting such a bizarre and unique concept at the center of a piece of fiction is a bold strategy, but Goldie Goldbloom’s debut novel, Toad’s Museum of Freaks and Wonders, never falls short of the mark. The winner of the 2008 AWP Award for the novel, it is apparent from the first few pages that you are in the hands of a master; Goldbloom writes with clarity and complexity, balancing abstract questions of identity, love, and value with a tensely developed plot and rich characters.
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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Joshua Beckman
  • Date Published April 2009
  • ISBN-13 978-1-933517-37-7
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 62pp
  • Price $14.00
  • Review by Jason Tandon
Joshua Beckman's fifth collection of poetry Take It, a title suggesting both offer and imperative, is the product of a big heart and a far-ranging imagination. Published without titles, the poems read like non-sequiturs, each one unfolding with peculiar associations of imagery and thought. The language can move from high-flowing rhetoric to obscenity in a matter of lines, and the personas are a varied cast of characters. This epistolary piece, for example, could be the satirical jottings of Vasco da Gama:
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  • Book Type Edited
  • by Gill Paul
  • Date Published April 2009
  • ISBN-13 978-1564785480
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 68pp
  • Price $13.95
  • Review by John Madera
Motoko Rich in “Translation Is Foreign to U.S. Publishers,” in the New York Times last year, claimed that U.S. editors “are generally more likely to bid on other hyped American or British titles than to look for new literature in the international halls.” There are exceptions of course, like Graywolf Press and Archipelago Books, as well as university presses like Open Letter at the University of Rochester. And there’s Dalkey Archive Press, an avatar of publishing works-in-translation, boasting titles from many sorely underrepresented countries. And with their new book Translation in Practice: A Symposium, Dalkey is the trailblazer once again.
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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Rick Reid
  • Date Published April 2009
  • ISBN-13 978-1-933354-76-7
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 100pp
  • Price $15.95
  • Review by Cynthia Reeser
Rick Reid’s full-length book of poetry, to be hung from the ceiling by strings of varying length, reads like a flip book in which lines have been inverted and language turned on its head. When read through quickly without too deep an analysis, the language evokes the impression of a fractured scene. Not only the imagery, but also the language is fragmented, the poet’s linguistic ear sometimes approximating that of an ESL speaker.
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  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Geoffrey Clark
  • Date Published September 2012
  • ISBN-13 978-1-59709-227-2
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 144pp
  • Price $16.95
  • Review by Ryan Wilson
Nostalgia, a common pitfall for many fiction writers, works purposefully in Geoffrey Clark’s Two, Two, Lily-White Boys, a risky, old-fashioned themed novel that takes aim at the usual sentimental tropes: adolescence, sex, innocence, apathy.
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  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Katharine Haake
  • Date Published March 2012
  • ISBN-13 978-0-9845782-1-4
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 294pp
  • Price $15.00
  • Review by H. V. Cramond
With increasing frequency, well-meaning friends have been sending me articles that encourage me to stop worrying about the next generation and just have fun. It’s not that they think everything will turn out OK, but rather, that we’re so far gone, there’s nothing to be done. It seems that groups of climate scientists are predicting our demise with a specificity and immediacy that would make an old-timey cult leader blush. The Water Wars are coming: look busy.
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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Sarah Eaton
  • Date Published January 2010
  • ISBN-13 978-1935402619
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 93pp
  • Price $16.00
  • Review by Michael Flatt
Sarah Eaton’s Tough Skin is a fun, scary book of prose-y poetry. Most people would probably agree that “scary” is an unusual quality to find in poetry. I can explain, I promise. While a lack of attachment to extended narrative prohibits the contemporary poem from creating the aspects of story necessary to truly feel fear – empathize-able characters, anticipation/suspense, etc. – Eaton’s poems make gestures toward horror in narrative microbursts. Think of the campy, shrewdly written episodes of Alfred Hitchcock Presents, which don’t give the viewer time to truly care whether the main character is murdered, but give pleasure of fright in their 30-minute mime shows of horror-film dialogue, melodrama and plot twists.
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