NewPages.com is news, information, and guides to literary magazines, independent publishers, creative writing programs, alternative periodicals, indie bookstores, writing contests, and more.

Book Reviews by Title - T (87)

  • Image Image
  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Mark Statman
  • Date Published April 2015
  • ISBN-13 978-1-935084-81-5
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 126pp
  • Price $16.00
  • Review by Valerie Wieland
At first I was baffled by Mark Statman’s style—succinct, clipped verses, and scant punctuation. But as I progressed through the pages of his new poetry book That Train Again, his poems took on more meaning. Having published numerous books of poetry and now teaching literary studies at Eugene Lang College, The New School for Liberal Arts, Statman’s skill and experience shows throughout this collection.
  • Image Image
  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Jen Beagin
  • Date Published October 2015
  • ISBN-13 978-0-8101-3207-8
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 208pp
  • Price $17.95
  • Review by Rhonda Browning White
Loneliness: it’s the one thing, above all things, that twenty-three-year-old Mona knows all about. That, and the proper way to clean house. In the first chapter of Jen Beagin’s Pretend I’m Dead, “Hole,” Mona is hard at work in Lowell, Massachusetts, splitting her lonesome hours between work as a self-employed housekeeper and a volunteer who provides clean needles to drug addicts. She’s particularly fond of one junkie, whom she dubs “Mr. Disgusting,” eventually falling headlong for his hopelessly fatalistic charm.
  • Image Image
  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Rod Smith
  • Date Published April 2015
  • ISBN-13 978-1-940696089
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 92pp
  • Price $18.00
  • Review by Benjamin Champagne
I’ve become more accustomed to seeing flarf poems performed via YouTube. I was beginning to believe that it was a medium designed for the internet purely, a meta commentary on how commentary works in this day. In Touché, Rod Smith weaves the internet generation together with Robert Creeley and William Carlos Williams. The old Yeat’s nugget, “Poetry makes nothing happen” is contorted and refracted through all of Smith’s lines to discuss how the great nothing is happening all around us.
  • Subtitle Poems in Conversation & a Conversation
  • Image Image
  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Molly Peacock and Amy M. Clark
  • Date Published October 2014
  • ISBN-13 978-1-940646-00-8
  • Format Chapbook
  • Pages 34pp
  • Price $20.00
  • Review by Valerie Wieland
A Turn Around the Mansion Grounds: Poems in Conversation & a Conversation is the third chapbook in a series that pairs two female poets, one well-known and the other a rising talent. Molly Peacock is widely anthologized and published in leading literary magazines in addition to her six volumes of poetry. She also helped create New York’s Poetry in Motion program. A decade ago, Peacock mentored Amy M. Clark. Meanwhile Clark’s poetry book won the 2009 Vassar Miller Prize in Poetry.
  • Image Image
  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Hoa Nguyen
  • Date Published July 2015
  • ISBN-13 N/A
  • Format Chapbook
  • Price $12.00
  • Review by Ryo Yamaguchi
I have always found Hoa Nguyen’s poems surprisingly comfortable to inhabit, considering the challenges they can offer, and Tells of the Crackling, a lovely little hand-stitched chapbook from Ugly Duckling Presse, is no different. Spare, elliptical—not exactly breezy, but roomy—these poems are a bit like walking over a brick path gone uneven from the undergrowth, fresh and tentative vegetal shoots sending trajectories of thought this way and that. Indeed, there is a dual “crackling” of both spring and autumn that characterize the poems, a light and almost sickly feel, a mind not quite right, the sound of tea being made in the background.
  • Image Image
  • Book Type Poetry
  • by G. C. Waldrep
  • Date Published May 2015
  • ISBN-13 978-1-938160-63-9
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 144pp
  • Price $16.00
  • Review by Ryo Yamaguchi
“The body as sculpture,” Testament—G. C. Waldrep’s book-length poem—begins, and with it we feel the steadying gesture that prefaces any great feat—fingers at one’s temples, eyes closed, the breath held.
  • Subtitle A Memoir
  • Image Image
  • Book Type Nonfiction
  • by Michael White
  • Date Published March 2015
  • ISBN-13 978-0892554379
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 192pp
  • Price $17.95
  • Review by Scott Russell Morris
A little bit travelogue, a little bit art history, and a little bit heartbreaking memoir, Michael White’s Travels in Vermeer explores the author’s fascination with the paintings of Johannes Vermeer, a fascination that takes him around Europe and America. Traveling to Amsterdam, The Hague, Delft, Washington D.C., New York, and London in the course of a year—while at the same time dealing with a painful divorce and custody battle, remembering the difficulties of his childhood and the alcoholism of his early adulthood, trying to get back into the dating scene, and remembering the brief, passionate romance with his first wife, who died of cancer—White gives long meditations on Vermeer’s paintings in lyric detail, becoming an intense eye through which we the readers also get to see them.
  • Image Image
  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Ken Mikolowski
  • Date Published April 2015
  • ISBN-13 978-0-8143-4065-3
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 71pp
  • Price $14.99
  • Review by Benjamin Champagne
Haiku is excessive. What luxury. In five mere words, Ken Mikolowski can do what the ancients needed seventeen syllables to accomplish in his book That That. Take the poem “No more / and / no less.” This says it all. It says everything that is needed to be said. It is a commentary on the state of the art and on the personal lives that we all carry in ourselves. Math uses simplification to produce elegant equations. In this same vein, Mikolowski uses reduction to get to the heart of the issue. These poems take on enormous universal equations by mimicking tiny proverbs. It is a great read for the age of Tweets. It reaches hearts and minds with the wisdom of Solomon using the tactics of a Facebook advertisement.
  • Image Image
  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Nicole Maruo
  • Date Published July 2014
  • ISBN-13 978-0-9850837-3-1
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 63pp
  • Price $15.00
  • Review by Benjamin Champagne
This is a found poetry book . . . of sorts. William Shatner did Palin on the “Tonight Show.” He took Sarah Palin’s farewell speech and delivered verbatim in a beatnik style with an accompaniment of bongos and stand-up bass. Hart Seely, Syracuse Post-Standard columnist, seemed to hit gold with Pieces of Intelligence, his collections of poems that he ripped from Donald Rumsfeld. Nicole Mauro takes the idea to the next logical level in Tax-Dollar Super Sonnet, working with the fervor of a mash-up DJ. The borrowed speeches span the history of America and bristle with the newness of the modern age. These poems have a real political edge added back to them, the words reorganizing themselves to fortify new points.
  • Image Image
  • Book Type Poetry
  • by elena minor
  • Date Published March 2014
  • ISBN-13 978-1-934819-31-9
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 75pp
  • Price $15.00
  • Review by Elizabeth O'Brien
Titulada is, without question, one of the best books of poetry I’ve read this year. Formally exploratory, sonically interesting, and rich with meaning, this book offers exactly what I’m hoping to find every time I pick up a new poetry collection: a challenge that rewards the effort put into reading it.
Page 2 of 7
newpages-footer-logo

We welcome any/all Feedback.