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Book Reviews by Title - T (80)

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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Juliet Patterson
  • Date Published November 2016
  • ISBN-13 978-1-937658-55-7
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 80pp
  • Price $15.95
  • Review by Ryo Yamaguchi

“Toward a flower- / ing I came // lowly lupine raised / wrist,” Juliet Patterson begins in “Toward,” the opening poem of her latest collection, Threnody, out last fall from Nightboat Books. And with these few lines, she deftly establishes the themes and sensibilities of her project: nature raised up into inspection, and with it, inspection itself (the wrist). Quiet, patient, yet often with a swarming force, these poems worry the fraught intersection between humanity and nature, where, as we quickly see, threat abides. If nature is a flowering, it is a flowering against the edges of nothingness.

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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Gillian Wegener
  • Date Published April 2017
  • ISBN-13 978-1-939639-13-4
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 96pp
  • Price $16.00
  • Review by Daniel Klawitter

In the poem “16 Reasons You Shouldn’t Like Me (And I Don’t Like Me Either),” Gillian Wegener writes: “I mine the cupboards of memory / And all I come up with is / A treasury of embarrassments.” But there is nothing embarrassing about this new full-length collection of poems, This Sweet Haphazard.

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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Craig Morgan Teicher
  • Date Published April 2017
  • ISBN-13 978-1-942683-31-5
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 80pp
  • Price $16.00
  • Review by Kimberly Ann Priest

“I was made // to be good like this, a father / before I was done being my father’s / son.” -from “Tracheotomy”

While most of the nation is wrangling over politics, some poets, like Craig Morgan Teicher, are reminding us of our human fragility in this pandemonium of voices. Poets like Teicher are forced by circumstance to cultivate a stillness of spirit for fear of inhaling or exhaling too carelessly and thereby breaking the already frayed cord of life struggling to hold itself together—that frayed cord being the speaker’s son so consciously observed in this 88-page manuscript of poems, The Trembling Answers.

 

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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Catherine Pierce
  • Date Published December 2016
  • ISBN-13 978-0-996-22066-8
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 88pp
  • Price $16.00
  • Review by Kimberly Ann Priest
Once, a hundred years ago, the tornado
was a young man being pulled along
by the Missouri River while his friends
laughed, then called, then screamed, then
went silent . . . .  — “On the Origins of the Tornado”
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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Anaïs Duplan
  • Date Published June 2016
  • ISBN-13 978-1-936767-45-8
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 80pp
  • Price $9.00
  • Review by DM O'Connor
You and I are filthy but it is / our filth" — “The Flying Phalangers”

Popping with pop culture. Zinging with Net slang. Formless yet formed. Slick and rough. Dating-sites and Netflix and Martha Stewart and Kendrick Lamar and Kim Kardashian and TMZ and ENVY and funerals and coke and religion and love and names become algebra and no one knows where they stand except on the cusp of a new paradigm, a new aesthetic—Take This Stallion is a force of poetic nature.

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  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Jodi Paloni
  • Date Published May 2016
  • ISBN-13 978-1-941209-38-7
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 204pp
  • Price $17.95
  • Review by Allyson Hoffman

They Could Live with Themselves by Jodi Paloni is a strong collection of short stories linked by the rural town of Stark Run, Vermont. The stories range in point of view and voice, from first-person perspectives of children to third-person point of view closely following a grandfather. Each story is self-contained yet enhanced by the others so that the collection ends with a clear picture of the New England town. Full of quiet tensions and unforgettable characters, Paloni’s collection presses into the daily conflicts and triumphs of the characters in ways that are both familiar and new.

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  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Mark Brazaitis
  • Date Published January 2015
  • ISBN-13 978-1-938769-03-0
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 180pp
  • Price $17.95
  • Review by Rhonda Browning White
“Katherine’s son was about to wrestle a blind boy. . . .” So begins “The Blind Wrestler,” the first short story in Mark Brazaitis’s collection Truth Poker.­ Surprising, intriguing, declarative sentences like this sink teeth into you and don’t let go, until you’ve reached each story’s satisfying ending. In “The Blind Wrestler,” Katherine has an affair with her son’s high-school-wrestling opponent. She regularly meets the handsome young man in a vacant house, “a den of mild iniquity,” where she confronts not only the loneliness in her marriage to a man eighteen years her senior, but also the way she blindly trudges through motherhood toward old age, without enjoying the journey or considering her destination.
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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Mark Statman
  • Date Published April 2015
  • ISBN-13 978-1-935084-81-5
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 126pp
  • Price $16.00
  • Review by Valerie Wieland
At first I was baffled by Mark Statman’s style—succinct, clipped verses, and scant punctuation. But as I progressed through the pages of his new poetry book That Train Again, his poems took on more meaning. Having published numerous books of poetry and now teaching literary studies at Eugene Lang College, The New School for Liberal Arts, Statman’s skill and experience shows throughout this collection.
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  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Jen Beagin
  • Date Published October 2015
  • ISBN-13 978-0-8101-3207-8
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 208pp
  • Price $17.95
  • Review by Rhonda Browning White
Loneliness: it’s the one thing, above all things, that twenty-three-year-old Mona knows all about. That, and the proper way to clean house. In the first chapter of Jen Beagin’s Pretend I’m Dead, “Hole,” Mona is hard at work in Lowell, Massachusetts, splitting her lonesome hours between work as a self-employed housekeeper and a volunteer who provides clean needles to drug addicts. She’s particularly fond of one junkie, whom she dubs “Mr. Disgusting,” eventually falling headlong for his hopelessly fatalistic charm.
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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Rod Smith
  • Date Published April 2015
  • ISBN-13 978-1-940696089
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 92pp
  • Price $18.00
  • Review by Benjamin Champagne
I’ve become more accustomed to seeing flarf poems performed via YouTube. I was beginning to believe that it was a medium designed for the internet purely, a meta commentary on how commentary works in this day. In Touché, Rod Smith weaves the internet generation together with Robert Creeley and William Carlos Williams. The old Yeat’s nugget, “Poetry makes nothing happen” is contorted and refracted through all of Smith’s lines to discuss how the great nothing is happening all around us.
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