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Book Reviews by Title - T (86)

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  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Stu Krieger
  • Date Published November 2017
  • ISBN-13 978-1941861-44-8
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 361pp
  • Price $22.95
  • Review by DM O'Connor

What if Lee Harvey Oswald’s assassination of JFK was thwarted? What if a hardworking FBI agent discovered the 9/11 plot and arrested the terrorists before they boarded planes? What if an 80-year-old Martin Luther King swore Barak Obama into office as the 44th president? What if a California screenwriter and professor, Stu Krieger, followed four families through these what-ifs from 1963 to 2009? Well, that would be That One Cigarette.

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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by David Rigsbee
  • Date Published August 2017
  • ISBN-13 978-1-62557-967-6
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 67pp
  • Price $15.95
  • Review by Benjamin J. Chase

Winner of two NEA fellowships, a Pushcart Prize, and an award from the Academy of American Poets, David Rigsbee is a seasoned American poet who has published ten books of poetry, multiple chapbooks, and a few translations over the past forty years. The poems in Rigsbee’s newest collection, This Much I Can Tell You, are as circumspect in language as they are in dispensing an immediate and experiential wisdom, as the book’s title implies.

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  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Matthew Pitt
  • Date Published August 2017
  • ISBN-13 978-1-938126-37-6
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 200pp
  • Price $16.95
  • Review by MacKenzie Hamilton

The twelve stories in These Are Our Demands dip their toes into potential futures and alternate realities. The characters in Matthew Pitt’s stories are vivid and sassy, and the writing is otherworldly. This collection lures you in with the promise of comfort, and then pulls down the straps and sends you on an unexpected wild ride. The stories have an unrivaled originality that is bound to keep you reading till the las page.

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  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Lois Ann Abraham
  • Date Published October 2016
  • ISBN-13 978-0-9911895-8-8
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 346pp
  • Price $16.95
  • Review by Jordana Landsman
If I told you the quick plot summary of Tina Goes to Heaven, by Lois Ann Abraham, you might visualize a familiar movie reel of hooker-with-a-heart-of-gold stories, and then you might yawn and ask me what else I was reading. But you’d have it wrong, and I’d have done you a grave disservice.
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  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Susan Jackson Rodgers
  • Date Published August 2017
  • ISBN-13 978-0-87580-768-3
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 180pp
  • Price $16.95
  • Review by Jordana Landsman

At times in life, we dive in, ready for action. At other times, often in transitional phases, we hang back and observe, browsing through possible lives and paths we might pursue.

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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Bao Phi
  • Date Published July 2017
  • ISBN-13 978-1-56689-470-8
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 112pp
  • Price $16.95
  • Review by DM O'Connor

The other day a seemingly nice older man whom I don’t know exclaimed, “I really don’t care for this hot weather—are you from Japan?” Hell yeah, I should have said. In fact, you know that movie Godzilla? That’s based on my life. It makes me want to vomit radioactively and commit zombie homicide, except in my version there is more than one Asian who survives. Our real conversation was not nearly as fun, but at least it didn’t end in violence. Our daughter overheard this and admonished me: “Don’t talk to strangers, Daddy.” – from “Greek Triptych”

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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Juliet Patterson
  • Date Published November 2016
  • ISBN-13 978-1-937658-55-7
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 80pp
  • Price $15.95
  • Review by Ryo Yamaguchi

“Toward a flower- / ing I came // lowly lupine raised / wrist,” Juliet Patterson begins in “Toward,” the opening poem of her latest collection, Threnody, out last fall from Nightboat Books. And with these few lines, she deftly establishes the themes and sensibilities of her project: nature raised up into inspection, and with it, inspection itself (the wrist). Quiet, patient, yet often with a swarming force, these poems worry the fraught intersection between humanity and nature, where, as we quickly see, threat abides. If nature is a flowering, it is a flowering against the edges of nothingness.

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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Gillian Wegener
  • Date Published April 2017
  • ISBN-13 978-1-939639-13-4
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 96pp
  • Price $16.00
  • Review by Daniel Klawitter

In the poem “16 Reasons You Shouldn’t Like Me (And I Don’t Like Me Either),” Gillian Wegener writes: “I mine the cupboards of memory / And all I come up with is / A treasury of embarrassments.” But there is nothing embarrassing about this new full-length collection of poems, This Sweet Haphazard.

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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Craig Morgan Teicher
  • Date Published April 2017
  • ISBN-13 978-1-942683-31-5
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 80pp
  • Price $16.00
  • Review by Kimberly Ann Priest

“I was made // to be good like this, a father / before I was done being my father’s / son.” -from “Tracheotomy”

While most of the nation is wrangling over politics, some poets, like Craig Morgan Teicher, are reminding us of our human fragility in this pandemonium of voices. Poets like Teicher are forced by circumstance to cultivate a stillness of spirit for fear of inhaling or exhaling too carelessly and thereby breaking the already frayed cord of life struggling to hold itself together—that frayed cord being the speaker’s son so consciously observed in this 88-page manuscript of poems, The Trembling Answers.

 

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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Catherine Pierce
  • Date Published December 2016
  • ISBN-13 978-0-996-22066-8
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 88pp
  • Price $16.00
  • Review by Kimberly Ann Priest
Once, a hundred years ago, the tornado
was a young man being pulled along
by the Missouri River while his friends
laughed, then called, then screamed, then
went silent . . . .  — “On the Origins of the Tornado”
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