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Book Reviews by Title - R (40)

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  • Book Type Nonfiction
  • by Patricia Vigderman
  • Date Published January 2018
  • ISBN-13 978-0-8142-5458-5
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 200pp
  • Price $21.95
  • Review by Valerie Wieland

Patricia Vigderman’s book, The Real Life of the Parthenon, appealed to me because, like her, I’d walked up to the Acropolis in Athens, Greece. My walk was during a honeymoon, hers—for the most part—were more empirical.

  • Subtitle Stories of an American Childhood
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  • Book Type Nonfiction
  • by Paul Hertneky
  • Date Published May 2016
  • ISBN-13 978-0-87233-222-5
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 224pp
  • Price $21.95
  • Review by Allyson Hoffman

Rust Belt Boy: Stories of an American Childhood is an outstanding portrait of Ambridge, Pennsylvania, a steel town which, like so many similar communities, helped shape and build the working America we know today. Gentle and loving, Paul Hertneky pays homage to the hometown he desired to leave for greater, unknown places. Hertneky’s descriptions left me yearning to travel to a version of the city that only exists in history books and his memoir.

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  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Jesús Salvador Treviño
  • Date Published September 2015
  • ISBN-13 978-1-55885-819-0
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 160pp
  • Price $17.95
  • Review by David Morgan O'Connor

When filmmakers turn to fiction, plot is always king. Characters and their motivations take a back seat, and the subtle components—the way fiction can get deep inside your mind and play with your inner voice—are often forgotten.

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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Maria Garcia Teutsch
  • Date Published 2015
  • ISBN-13 978-0-9895745-8-7
  • Format Chapbook
  • Pages 23pp
  • Price $8.00
  • Review by Cheyanne Gustason
As I sat down with The Revolution Will Have Its Sky by Maria Garcia Teutsch, I was, in the longer term, in the midst of reading Tolstoy’s War and Peace. I could never have guessed Maria Garcia Teutsch’s Revolution would be a perfect pairing with that venerable epic, and yet, much to my delight, it is. The Revolution Will Have Its Sky is, of course, much shorter in length, but it explores and illuminates many of the same themes and dichotomies of Tolstoy’s epic novel, and to similar thought-provoking effect. While that may seem hefty praise, I challenge any reader of Teutsch’s work to disagree that its ideas, comparisons, and discoveries succinctly coincide with those long found in War and Peace. The Revolution Will Have Its Sky is in its own right an enticing, nuanced, and many-layered collection of poems that will keep you satisfied while you read, and deep in thought long after you have put it down.
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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Noel Sloboda
  • Date Published April 2015
  • ISBN-13 978­-1­-936715­-86­-2
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 21pp
  • Price $12.00
  • Review by Benjamin Champagne
Risk Management Studies is a very reasonable riot. Noel Sloboda is playful through and through, and it is refreshing to read an entire chapbook that stays consistently hilarious. While the collection has a modernist slant, it never strays into critical territory.
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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Chris Green
  • Date Published October 2014
  • ISBN-13 978-1-936419-44-9
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 74pp
  • Price $15.95
  • Review by Benjamin Champagne
In the dedication Chris Green states that there is “no straightforward compensation.” The rest of the poems follow Joseph Brodsky’s quote during his employment trial, “Everything was interesting to me. I changed jobs because I wanted to learn more about life, about people.” There is a Midwestern, blue collar motif to the language that runs through the poems. There is plenty of indirect and direct evidence of the observations of a poet from Chicago. Many times I thought of Nickel and Dimed, Barbara Ehrenreich’s exposé on living a low-wage lifestyle.
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  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Rusty Barnes
  • Date Published March 2014
  • ISBN-13 978-1934513453
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 240pp
  • Price $16.00
  • Review by Audrey Quinn
Reckoning by Rusty Barnes is the story of a Richard Logan, a fourteen-year-old boy in a small Appalachian town. Richard and Katie, the pretty new girl in town, find an unconscious woman in a lake one day while swimming. This woman, Misty, along with Katie’s mother and Lyle, Richard’s adult nemesis, lead the way down a path into debauchery and violence in their wooded hamlet. In the description on the back of the book, it is called “brutal and beautiful” which is true in parts. The brutality is clearly used as a selling point, unsurprising when shows like Breaking Bad and True Detective are being celebrated
  • Subtitle Poems 1998-2008
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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Hoa Nguyen
  • Date Published September 2014
  • ISBN-13 978-1-933517-92-6
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 272pp
  • Price $22.00
  • Review by Elizabeth O'Brien
Red Juice: Poems 1998-2008 is the first compilation of Hoa Nguyen’s work, gathering several of her previous small press chapbooks, including Red Juice from effing press, Your Ancient See Through from subpress, and Hecate Lochia from Hot Whiskey Press. Arranged chronologically, the book demonstrates the progressive development of some of Nguyen’s key interests—including the contradictions of popular culture; the visceral nature of childbirth, mothering, and womanhood; and a clashing sense of both culpability in and removal from impending environmental collapse.

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  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Emma Donoghue
  • Date Published September 2010
  • ISBN-13 978-0-316-09833-5
  • Format Hardcover
  • Pages 336pp
  • Price $24.99
  • Review by Sara C. Rauch
I was website hopping the other day, and came to the Brooklyn bookstore BookCourt's list of Top 10 fiction bestsellers. On their hardcover list, at #3, was Room by Emma Donoghue, which they call "a perfect example of that book (maybe Wolf Hall is also in this category) that's been a total success without being read by a single person under the age of 30." I am here to attest that I am a person under 30 (though not for long) who has read the book. Not only read it, couldn't put it down. While I was on vacation in Miami. It is that good.
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  • Book Type Novel
  • by T.M. Murphy & Seton Murphy
  • Date Published May 2010
  • ISBN-13 978-1-935557-55-5
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 272pp
  • Price $15.95
  • Review by Elizabeth Townsend
The Running Waves is a book about two brothers learning to come to terms with hard times in each of their lives. The younger of the two brothers, Colin, is a 19-year-old shoe store employee trying, unsuccessfully at first, to get past the accident that killed his two best friends the previous year. Dermot is the 23-year-old elder brother, home from college for the summer. He comes home to hide for awhile from the fact that his girlfriend, someone he thought might be “the one,” broke up with him. The pair lives in Silver Shores Cape Cod, a popular destination for tourists on their way to Martha’s Vineyard. Dermot can see that Colin is not doing well and wants to help his brother but must first figure himself out.
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