NewPages.com is news, information, and guides to literary magazines, independent publishers, creative writing programs, alternative periodicals, indie bookstores, writing contests, and more.

Book Reviews by Title - L (89)

  • Image Image
  • Book Type Novel
  • by Ginnetta Correli
  • Date Published September 2008
  • ISBN-13 0615213847
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 238pp
  • Price $15.95
  • Review by Cynthia Reeser
In Ginnetta Correli’s debut novel, The Lost Episodes of Beatie Scareli, the reader, cast as an audience member, is no less a part of the script than the other offbeat characters. The only stipulation is that our participation is limited solely to watching the scenes play out from Beatie Scareli’s unfortunate life. Written as a pseudo-screenplay, the “cast” includes Beatie’s father, a neglectful man with a strong potential for danger; Beatie’s mother Frata, a schizophrenic who believes she is Lucy Ricardo; Beatie at age 12; Beatie as an adult commenting on scenes from her troubled youth; and the reader, identified simply as “You.”
  • Image Image
  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Robert Kelly
  • Date Published April 2010
  • ISBN-13 978-0-929701-89-9
  • Format Hardcover
  • Pages 223pp
  • Price $24.00
  • Review by Thomas Hubbard
Entering my neighborhood from a different direction for the first time, I became disoriented, unable to find my building right away. Then, there it was! And I suddenly had a new "feel" for the place. Experiencing the familiar from a new perspective can bring disorientation that, fading, leaves an enhanced understanding. In much the same way, Robert Kelly's fiction shows us our familiar world from a new perspective, and expands our understanding of this life we live.
  • Image Image
  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Jane Unrue
  • Date Published April 2010
  • ISBN-13 978-1-886224-96-4
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 112pp
  • Price $14.00
  • Review by Elizabeth Townsend
Life of a Star presents itself as a series of short ramblings of the narrator, who is also the main character. The ramblings could even be called diary entries as they are the thoughts and desires of the narrator. The main character is a woman who imagines herself to be an actress, something that is evident throughout the book.
  • Image Image
  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Molly Brodak
  • Date Published March 2010
  • ISBN-13 978-1-58729-858-5
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 64pp
  • Price $17.00
  • Review by Kristin Abraham
Of all of the Iowa Poetry Prize winners I have read, Molly Brodak’s A Little Middle of the Night may be the most stunning, the most complete and beautiful package; every poem in the book is a gem and they all fit together to form a simple and elegant volume that I am pleased to have in my collection.
  • Image Image
  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Lisa Olstein
  • Date Published June 2009
  • ISBN-13 978-1-55659-301-7
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 91pp
  • Price $15.00
  • Review by Christine Kanownik
Lisa Olstein's Lost Alphabet is a serious meditation. All 90 pages of poetry have the same short paragraph form with a bracketed title that informs and sometimes subverts the poems. The setting seems post-apocalyptic in a quiet sort of way. There are no Mad Max renegades, but there is an unnamed narrator who moves to the edge of some pre-industrial village of horse traders where people dance to music made with a “dull spoon on the side of a pig.” The narrator is obsessed with the study of moths. The goal of this study is at first unclear, but as the narrator focuses more on the project, more questions arise.
  • Image Image
  • Book Type Stories
  • by Felisberto Hernández
  • Translated From Spanish
  • by Esther Allen
  • Date Published July 2008
  • ISBN-13 978-0811217538
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 212pp
  • Price $14.95
  • Review by Josh Maday
Even if most English readers don’t know it, the influence of Felisberto Hernández’s writing can still be seen today in the work of Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Julio Cortazar, and Italo Calvino. Despite the recent trend of rediscovered Latin American writers, such as Roberto Bolaño, and their torrents of translated work, it is unsurprising that the foundations of Latin American literature are still being unearthed. Luckily, with this collection of two novellas and four short stories by Felisberto Hernández, one more influential Latin American writer’s work is finally available to English readers.
  • Image Image
  • Book Type Novel
  • by Michael Joyce
  • Date Published July 2008
  • ISBN-13 978-0929701882
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 207pp
  • Price $15.00
  • Review by Rav Grewal-Kök
Almost nothing happens in Liam’s Going, a novel by Michael Joyce now out in paperback six years after its hardcover release. Joyce has written a number of hypertext fictions, and there is something of the feel of hypertext to this novel too, both in its swirling temporality – it loops continually from the present to the recent and more distant past – and in its occasional lack of momentum.
  • Image Image
  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Annemarie Schwarzenbach
  • Translated From German
  • by Lucy Renner Jones
  • Date Published October 2011
  • ISBN-13 978-0-85742-016-9
  • Format Hardcover
  • Pages 140pp
  • Price $15.00
  • Review by Wendy Breuer
Lyric Novella, by Swiss writer Annemarie Schwarzenbach, was published in 1933. The novella is slim. This edition, translated by Lucy Renner Jones, adds more weight with a translator’s introduction and an afterword that examines Schwarzenbach’s life and literary influences. I wanted, first, to let this lyric of youth and obsessive love stand on its own, to be convinced by the writing rather than be influenced by all the interpretation.
  • Image Image
  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Julia Bloch
  • Date Published April 2012
  • ISBN-13 9780981497563
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 81pp
  • Price $15.00
  • Review by Aimee Nicole
Letters to Kelly Clarkson is full of short letters written from the narrator to American Idol winner Kelly Clarkson, beginning with “Dear Kelly.” Although there were certainly thoughts and points that stuck out as interesting to me, the majority of the letters were ungrounded and rambling. A letter at the beginning of the book opens with: “You know, sitting here, eating my microwaved tomatoes on somewhat tough toast, I think I could give myself another chance.” And I started silently cheering, we all deserve a second chance! Good for you! But then the next lines were: “Seriously, can you tell me why I keep dreaming of a chipped white truck? Could it be the swerve of it, the handle? A rush of blood to the hand.” I was so intrigued by the second chance that I wanted to know all the details of how she messed up and with whom and how she was planning to fix it. Yet there was no resolution for me and I felt like the writer had left me high and dry, though perhaps this was her intention.
  • Image Image
  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Diana Salier
  • Date Published March 2012
  • ISBN-13 9780984084227
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 61pp
  • Price $12.00
  • Review by Aimee Nicole
After reading the title, I wasn’t really sure what to expect from this book. It gave me the strange feeling I’d be reading letters, or advice, from the future. Ironically, Salier focuses tremendously on the current so-called Mayan threat of the end of the world. Since we have already lived through a few apocalyptic threats within the last decade or so, it’s refreshing to contemplate the future through the lens of someone who admits that “every friday at 2pm i feel strongly / that i should’ve been an astronaut.”
Page 5 of 7
newpages-footer-logo

We welcome any/all Feedback.