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Book Reviews by Title - A (74)

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  • Book Type Nonfiction
  • by Laura Raicovich
  • Date Published April 2017
  • ISBN-13 978-1-56689-466-1
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 104pp
  • Price $12.95
  • Review by Valerie Wieland

You may not have heard of conceptual artist Walter De Maria, but if you’re curious like me, you’ll want to know more about him and his career after reading Laura Raicovich’s book-length essay, At the Lightning Field.

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  • Book Type Nonfiction Edited
  • by Christopher Schaberg & Mark Yakich
  • Date Published July 2016
  • ISBN-13 978-1-78279-818-7
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 219pp
  • Price $22.95
  • Review by Valerie Wieland

If you’ve ever flown anywhere, you’ll identify with many of the short essays in Airplane Reading, edited by Christopher Schaberg and Mark Yakich. Even if you’ve never flown, it’s still worth reading for sentences like this: “A flying problem is the opposite of a drinking problem: it starts when you lose interest in the free booze.” So writes Ian Bogost in his essay “Frequent Flight.” Bogost is indeed a frequent flyer at more than 200,000 miles in a year. His piece is joined by essays from fellow travelers, including several doctors who take to the sky.

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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Molly Peacock
  • Date Published January 2017
  • ISBN-13 978-0-393-25471-6
  • Format Hardcover
  • Pages 128pp
  • Price $25.95
  • Review by Valerie Wieland

The person referenced in the title and pages of Molly Peacock’s book of poetry The Analyst is Joan Workman Stein, a New York practitioner who had a stroke in 2012 and later was able to resume her love of painting. Over a span of close to 40 years, the initial therapist-patient relationship between Peacock and Stein became a close and enduring friendship.

  • Subtitle Philip Booth and the Gift of Place
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  • Book Type Nonfiction
  • by Jeanne Braham
  • Date Published November 2015
  • ISBN-13 978-0-87233-206-5
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 145pp
  • Price $23.95
  • Review by Valerie Wieland

Available Light: Philip Booth and the Gift of Place is as much a travelogue of picturesque Maine, and especially the town of Castine, as it is a biography of the late poet Philip Booth. In Jeanne Braham’s tidy book, the town and the poet are pretty much inseparable.

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  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Brian Booker
  • Date Published May 2016
  • ISBN-13 978-1-942658-12-2
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 256pp
  • Price $16.95
  • Review by Allyson Hoffman

Tinged with mystery and magical realism, Brian Booker’s Are You Here for What I’m Here For? is an outstanding collection of self-contained short stories with themes of sleeplessness, sadness, and sickness. The characters, setting, and point of view vary from each story, which demonstrates the wide range of Booker’s fiction writing skills. Furthermore, the stories occur in different, sometimes undeterminable time periods, adding flavor and movement to the reading experience.

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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Marsha de la O
  • Date Published September 2015
  • ISBN-13 978-1-938160-81-3
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 104pp
  • Price $16.00
  • Review by Elizabeth O'Brien

Marsha de la O situates her poem “Crossing Over” in time and space as follows:

This time of year, gold lingers
                    in thin autumn air
         ether-light shining
crossing over [.]
  • Subtitle Finding a Place in the World from Kashmir to New York
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  • Book Type Nonfiction
  • by Githa Hariharan
  • Date Published March 2016
  • ISBN-13 978-1632060617
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 304pp
  • Price $16.99
  • Review by Nichole L. Reber
“Stories, like real life, can strip you of the prettier features of illusion.” This is exactly the kind of line that ensures us we are in capable hands with Githa Hariharan, who narrates her travelogue Almost Home: Finding a Place in the World from Kashmir to New York more as a travel guide, less as the star of her own world. To read this book is to venture on a rigorous journey around the globe and through pockets of time. As a fellow travel writer and having also lived a peripatetic life that crosses continents and hemispheres, this is the best travel book I have ever read.
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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Jennifer Nelson
  • Date Published Fall 2015
  • ISBN-13 978-1-937027-51-3
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 88pp
  • Price $14.00
  • Review by Benjamin Champagne
Aim At The Centaur Stealing Your Wife amalgamates the slang of the centuries. Jennifer Nelson is an art historian with a Twitter feed and some resolve. The title is apt to produce a complex thought system about the nature of relationships. Philosophy majors may recall Heracles shooting the poison arrow at Nessus, the centaur trying to force himself upon his wife. Nessus lies to the woman and deceives her into killing her own husband. Whether the extrapolation is made unto interpersonal living, it can certainly be seen intrapersonally. 
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  • Book Type Poetry
  • by Tony Hoagland
  • Date Published September 2015
  • ISBN-13 978-1-55597-718-4
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 96pp
  • Price $16.00
  • Review by Valerie Wieland
Tony Hoagland has been high on the list of established poets for years. The great thing about his poetry is the way he takes simple vocabulary and channels it into something amazing or disquieting or droll. He frequently writes what the rest of us might be thinking. In his latest book, Application for Release from the Dream, he demonstrates this in the poem “His Majesty.”
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  • Book Type Fiction
  • by Susan McCarty
  • Date Published June 2015
  • ISBN-13 978-1-941143-03-2
  • Format Paperback
  • Pages 268pp
  • Price $16.50
  • Review by Katy Haas
If bodies are temples, Susan McCarty is an expert demolitionist. In Anatomies, McCarty breaks these temples down, rips through drywall and flesh, tears sexuality and humanity from their hinges, and leaves behind the barebones, the nervous system, the warm, buzzing electrical impulses buried beneath the exteriors of the temples housing her characters.
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