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Editor's Picks New Book Arrivals (320)

Published September 12, 2017

Reassurance in Negative Space

Written by

Elizabyth A. Hiscox's Reassurance in Negative Space is a debut collection with the seasoned deftness of a master in its keen intelligence, wit, innovative diction, unflinching handling of loss and grief, and deep lyricism. Hiscox muses with revelatory insights on such wide-ranging topics as multifarious netsuke, nuclear fallout, artichokes “coming into new brilliance,” the DMV line, the Zen of “the sublime [that] can spring from small things.” By turns ecstatic and somber, profane and sacred, wise and whimsical, Hiscox proves she is a poet of the first order with this memorable collection.

Read more... Published September 12, 2017
Published September 12, 2017

All My Heroes Are Broke

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All My Heroes Are Broke is a poetry collection written from the perspective of a first-generation American coming to terms with the implicit struggles and disillusionment of the “American Dream.” All My Heroes Are Broke primarily uses two forms: short, image driven poems inspired by the works of Robert Bly and Po Chu-I; and longer narrative poems that reveal more personal information about the speaker, in the manner of Li-Young Lee and Frank O’Hara, allowing the speaker to project his own life onto the surroundings and the people of those larger communities.

Read more... Published September 12, 2017
Published August 10, 2017

The Great Tower of Elfland

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Beginning in the mid-1950s, scholars proposed that the Inklings were a unified group centered on fantasy, imagination, and Christianity. This text overturns the misapplication of a divided worldview among two Inklings, J. R. R. Tolkien and C. S. Lewis, and their forerunners, G. K. Chesterton and George MacDonald. Analyzing their literary, scholarly, and interpersonal texts, Zachary A. Rhone’s The Great Tower of Elfland clarifies the unities of their thinking.

Read more... Published August 10, 2017
Published August 10, 2017

¡Manteca!

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Containing the work of more than 40 poets—equally divided between men and women—who self-identify as Afro-Latino, ¡Manteca! is the first poetry anthology to highlight writings by Latinos of African descent. The themes covered are as diverse as the authors themselves. Editor and scholar Melissa Castillo-Garsow writes in her introduction that “the experiences and poetic expression of Afro-Latinidad were so diverse” that she could not begin to categorize it. Some write in English, others in Spanish. They are Puerto Rican, Dominican, and almost every combination conceivable, including Afro-Mexican. Containing the work of well-known writers such as Pedro Pietri, Miguel Piñero and E. Ethelbert Miller, less well-known ones are ready to be discovered in these pages.

Read more... Published August 10, 2017
Published November 30, -0001

Marvels of the Invisible

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In this award-winning debut collection, the smallest things of the world bear enormous emotive weight. For Jenny Molberg, the invisible and barely visible are forms of memory, articulations of our place in the cosmos. Parsing the intersections between science and personal history, and contemplating archival letters from 17th- and 18th-century scientists along with new studies in biological phenomena, Molberg’s poems examine complexities of relationships with parents and the faultiness of certainty about earthly permanence. Marvels of the Invisible sounds the depths of both grief and amazement, two kinds of awareness inseparably entwined.

Read more... Published November 30, -0001
Published November 30, -0001

Everyone Was There

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"In so many of these stories, Anthony Varallo does something both rare and wonderful: he manages to be both funny and profound. Here you'll meet the life of the party who's secretly miserable and reconnect with the popular kids you knew in high school who now find themselves stalled out in melancholy middle age, their children and the world seemingly uninterested in them. Varallo is a master at characterization—his misfits and lonely divorced fathers, his vivid adolescents and tongue-in-cheek John Updike cameo—there is so much here that I admired and enjoyed." — Christine Sneed

Read more... Published November 30, -0001
Published August 10, 2017

Mean

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True crime, memoir, and ghost story, Mean is the bold and hilarious tale of Myriam Gurba’s coming of age as a queer, mixed-race Chicana. Blending radical formal fluidity and caustic humor, Gurba takes on sexual violence, small towns, and race, turning what might be tragic into piercing, revealing comedy. This is a confident, intoxicating, brassy book that takes the cost of sexual assault, racism, misogyny, and homophobia deadly seriously.

Read more... Published August 10, 2017
Published August 10, 2017

Just Passing Through

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“M. Scott Douglass’s Just Passing Through bristles with direct, honest, often humorous tales of the road. A sharp observer of human behavior—on motorcycles and in cars, in rest stops and motels, at red lights and roadsides—he doesn’t miss a thing. Reading these poems, I feel like he’s nudging me in the ribs, and pointing, saying, ‘Get a load of that,’ and I’m happily following his gaze, trusting him not to know where we’re going.” —Jim Daniels

Read more... Published August 10, 2017
Published July 12, 2017

Little Boxes

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What happens when television is part of your cultural DNA? Twelve writers talk about their influences, and they’re more Magnum, P.I. than Marcel Proust. This is cultural criticism from an enthusiast’s point of view—taking sitcoms and dramedies and very special episodes seriously, not because they’re art, but because they matter to us.

Read more... Published July 12, 2017
Published July 12, 2017

Hua Shi Hua

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In her debut collection Hua Shi Hua Jen Hyde examines how the mechanisms of language shape worlds. This four parts of the collection unfolds in a precise lyricism that never shies from confronting the stubbornness of translation while Hyde wields it as her own to claim literacies of heritage and art. Dividing the book’s sections with Mandarin Chinese characters (all of which sound the same to the Western ear) and drawing from both classic Chinese and English texts, Hyde synthesizes and bisects biracial identification to culture and belonging.

Read more... Published July 12, 2017
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