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Editor's Picks New Book Arrivals (298)

Published May 23, 2017

Our Sudden Museum - Editor's Pick

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With elegies to a brother, sister and father at the core, Robert Fanning’s third collection examines what sustains in us in spite of loss. In richly sonic and poignant lyrics, we witness the wilder forces beyond our houses and families and bastions of safety—of birds and wind, field and sea—of the beauty and devastation that we cannot contain and to which we eventually succumb. In poems alternately harrowing and humorous, bright and bittersweet, Fanning looks beyond grief to his children and the world to come, in a tenacious celebration of both impermanence and of what endures. 

Read more... Published May 23, 2017
Published May 23, 2017

Tómas Jónsson, Bestseller

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A retired, senile bank clerk confined to his basement apartment, Tómas Jónsson decides that, since memoirs are all the rage, he’s going to write his own—a sure bestseller—that will also right the wrongs of contemporary Icelandic society. Egoistic, cranky, and digressive, Tómas blasts away while relating pick-up techniques, meditations on chamber pot use, ways to assign monetary value to noise pollution, and much more. His rants parody and subvert the idea of the memoir—something that’s as relevant today in our memoir-obsessed society as it was when the novel was first published.

Read more... Published May 23, 2017
Published May 23, 2017

Ordinary Trauma

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Through spare yet lyrical prose, Jennifer Sinor threads together the story of how she learned to carry the bucket she was born into and reclaim all that was tossed away. In short, almost telegraphic, linked pieces, Ordinary Trauma reveals moments in life that are made to appear unremarkable but harm deeply. Set against the late Cold War and a military childhood spent amid fast-attack submarines and long-range nuclear missiles, this memoir delivers a revelatory look at how moments that typically pass unnoticed form the very basis for our perceptions of both love and loss.

Read more... Published May 23, 2017
Published May 23, 2017

The Dangerous Book of Poetry for Planes

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Subversive, erotic, and sublime, The Dangerous Book of Poetry for Planes challenges the conventions of airplane reading. Family, faith, technology, celebrity—yes, they are here. But so too is sex as philanthropy, flight as weltschmerz, and grammar as the ultimate loneliness. In a world that often seems to have lost its affinity for wonder, The Dangerous Book of Poetry for Planes reminds us that our greatest sense is our sense of wordplay.

Read more... Published May 23, 2017
Published May 23, 2017

In the Language of My Captor

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Acclaimed poet Shane McCrae’s latest collection is a book about freedom told through stories of captivity. Historical persona poems and a prose memoir at the center of the book address the illusory freedom of both black and white Americans. In the book’s three sequences, McCrae explores the role mass entertainment plays in oppression, he confronts the myth that freedom can be based upon the power to dominate others, and, in poems about the mixed-race child adopted by Jefferson Davis in the last year of the Civil War, he interrogates the infrequently examined connections between racism and love.

Read more... Published May 23, 2017
Published May 23, 2017

The World Is One Place

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The World Is One Place explores how the Middle East has captured the imaginations of a significant group of Native American poets, most of whom have traveled to the Middle East (broadly defined to include the Arab world, Israel, Turkey, Afghanistan). What qualities of the region drew them there? What did they see? How did their cultural perspectives as Native Americans inform their reactions and insights? Three thematic sections—Place, People, Spirit—feature poems and notes inspired by the poets experiences of Middle Eastern cultures.

Read more... Published May 23, 2017
Published April 20, 2017

A Woman Walked into the Bar

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From a Caribbean resort for the generously-figured to rivers and bayous that hold secrets or become escape routes into and out of relationships. The characters in these stories worm their way into your psyche. They don't always do the right (or legal) thing, but they act for the right reasons.

Read more... Published April 20, 2017
Published April 20, 2017

Marlena

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Everything about fifteen-year-old Cat’s new town in rural Michigan is lonely and off-kilter until she meets her neighbor, the manic, beautiful, pill-popping Marlena. But within the year, Marlena is dead, drowned in six inches of icy water in the woods nearby. Now, decades later, when a ghost from that year surfaces, Cat must try again to move on. Told in a haunting dialogue between past and present, Marlena is an unforgettable story of the friendships that shape us beyond reason and the ways it might be possible to pull oneself back from the brink.

Read more... Published April 20, 2017
Published April 20, 2017

Letters Like the Day

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Georgia O’Keeffe mistrusted words. She claimed color as her language. Nevertheless, in the course of her long life, the great American painter wrote thousands of letters―more than two thousand survive between her and her husband, Alfred Stieglitz, alone. Jennifer Sinor’s Letters Like the Day honors O’Keeffe, her modernist landscapes, and, crucially, the value of letter writing. In the painter’s correspondence, we find an intimacy with words that is all her own. Taking her letters as a touchstone, Sinor experiments with the limits of language using the same aesthetic that drove O’Keeffe’s art.

Read more... Published April 20, 2017
Published April 20, 2017

Inside My Pencil

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As a teaching artist with Detroit's longest enduring literary non-profit—InsideOut Literary Arts Project—fiction writer and novelist Peter Markus has inspired thousands of students to become believers in the power of words, armed with nothing but an ordinary pencil—the same beat-up, unsharpened pencil Markus has carried with him, story has it, since he was in the third grade. He invites children to explore the dreamscapes of their imaginary worlds, encouraging even the most resistant students to see what magic and wonder awaits them.

Read more... Published April 20, 2017
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