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Gulf Coast 2016 Prize Winners

Published August 15, 2017 Posted By Denise Hill
gulf coastThe newest issue of Gulf Coast (v29 n2) features winners from two of their annual contests. Established in 2008, the Barthelme Prize for Short Prose is open to pieces of prose poetry, flash fiction, and micro-essays of 500 words or fewer. One winner receives $1,000 + publication; two honorable mentions receive $250. All entries will be considered for paid publication on the Gulf Coast website as Online Exclusives.

2016 Barthelme Prize 
Judge: Jim Shepherd

Winner
Andrew Mitchell, "Going North"

Honorable Mentions - Both also received print publication
Molly Reid, "Fall from Grace"
Marya Hornbacher "A Peck of Beets"

The Gulf Coast Prize in Translation Contest is open to prose (fiction or nonfiction). The winner receives $1,000 and publication in the journal. Two honorable mentions receive $250.

2016 Gulf Coast Prize in Translation
Judge: Idra Novey

Winner
Carina del Valle Schorske for a translation of Marigloria Palma

Honorable Mentions
Ondrej Pazdirek
Tim DeMay

New Lit on the Block :: Arkana

Published August 11, 2017 Posted By Denise Hill
arkanaArkana is a new biannual online journal published by the Arkansas Writers MFA Program at the University of Central Arkansas. While the name may seem obviously connected to the place, “arcana” can also mean a secret or a mystery, or a powerful and secret remedy, some “great secret of nature that the alchemists sought to discover.” This definition, the editors explain, is what they want Arkana  to be all about: “discovering powerful voices that haven’t previously been heard, but speak to human nature and the human experience. Publishing every genre possible, and with the welcoming flexibility online offers, the editors want to “be the literary journal of mysteries and marginalized voices—to champion the arcane.”

Florida Review 2016 Editor's Award Winners

Published August 10, 2017 Posted By Denise Hill
The newest issue of The Florida Review (40.1, 2017) features winners of the 2016 Editor's Awards. This annual award accepts submissions in fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry. Winners receive $1000 upon publication in TFR  with finalists also being considered for publication.

florida reviewNonfiction
Winner: Rebekah Taussig, "I Called Mine Beautiful"
Finalist: Robert Stothart, "Nighthawks"

Poetry
Winner: Paige Lewis, "Angel, Overworked"
Finalist: Donna Coffey, "Sunset Cruise at Key West"
Finalist: Christina Hammerton, "Old Pricks"

Fiction
Winner: Derek Palacio, "Kisses"
Finalist: Nicholas Lepre, "Pretend You’re Really Here"
Finalist: Terrance Manning, Jr., "Vision House"

The Florida Review is avaiable for single issue purchase on the NewPages Magazine Webstore.

Willow Springs Celebrates 40

Published August 09, 2017 Posted By Denise Hill
willow springsHappy 40th Anniversary to Willow Springs magazine of poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and interviews published out of Spokane, Washington. Issue 80 features approriate celebratory cover art by Marta Berens ("Crystal Structure") of a small girl seeming to be caught in mid-dance, and inside this issue, the poem "Anniversary," by Elizabeth Austen includes these closing lines: "I twist as if I, like the jellyfishdress, / am suspended, still / thick with possibility, still buoyant."

May Willow Springs continue on another forty years - buoyant and thick with possibility!

Books :: 2017 PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize Winner

Published August 08, 2017 Posted By Katy Haas

insurrections rion amilcar scottEach year, PEN America grants one winner of the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction a $25,000 cash prize, given in memory of Robert W. Bingham. The 2017 winner, judged by Jami Attenberg, Tanwi Nandini Islam, Randall Kenan, Hanna Pylväinen, and Akhil Sharma, is Rion Amilcar Scott with Insurrections (University of Kentucky Press, August 2017).

In the debut collection, Rion Amilcar Scott gives life to residents of the fictional town of Cross River, Maryland, a largely black settlement founded in 1807. Written in lyrical prose, Scott presents characters who dare to make their own choices in the depths of darkness and hopelessness.

Stop by the University of Kentucky Press website to listen to interviews with the author, learn more about the award-winning collection, and order digital or print copies.

New Critical Art Writing Prize

Published August 08, 2017 Posted By Denise Hill
toni beauchampGulf Coast: A Journal of Literature and Fine Arts introduces The Toni Beauchamp Prize in Critical Art Writing to provide a venue and support for young and mid-career U.S. writers. "Grounded in both scholarship and journalism, critical art writing occupies a specific niche. The best examples appeal to a diverse readership through an accessible approach and maintain a unique voice and literary excellence. The Prize will consider submissions of work that has been written (or published) within the last year. A variety of creative approaches and formats to writing on the visual arts are encouraged, and can include thematic essays, exhibition reviews and scholarly essays."

There is no fee to enter this contest, prizes will be awarded for first ($3000) and two runners up ($1000) as well as print/online publication. Deadline: September 1, 2017.

Toni Beauchamp [pictured] was the president of Art Lies Board from 2002-2004. See the Gulf Coast website for more details.

Lit Mag Covers :: Picks of the Week

Published August 07, 2017 Posted By Denise Hill
malahat reviewI have to admit to being slightly creeped out by The Malahat Review cover art "Fly Face" by Aurel Schmidt - but at the same time, I can't bring myself to look away from the fine detail of this pencil and acrylic on paper.
missouri reviewSandy Skoglund's "Fox Games" is the perfect image for The Missouri Review  Summer 2017 theme "Mischief Makers."
able museI'm not sure if the cover images "Remote Lighthouse" by David Mark / "Delta Flyers" by Barry Jones was intentional - with the black and white lighthouse - given the special art feature in this Summer 2017 issue of Able Muse: A Zebra Theme - a photographic exhibit of zebra imagery from artists worldwide.

Glimmer Train Craft Essays

Published August 01, 2017 Posted By Denise Hill
Glimmer Train Bulletins are produced monthly with essays written by writers (published in GT) and creative writing teachers on topics related to craft and the industry.

silas dent zobalIn the most recent issue, #157 August 2017, Rowena Macdonald offers 10 tips for writing dialogue, offering this advice: ". . . remember, when it comes to writing dialogue in prose you need to convey the impression of reality rather than verbatim speech." Silas Dent Zobal [pictured] offers a meaningful exploration of finding the heart of the story and the difficulty of writing about what can't be written: "That's what I want to tell you. Here, right here, is where you can find the heart of the heart of your story. Not in a place but in no place. Not in clarity but in ambiguity." And Joshua Henkin provides commentary on developing character background: when Mia comes from Montreal instead of Maryland, it changes how her family got there and the impact of their choices on her character in story - and the writer's responsibility to the "seeds of a narrative."

Three excellent essays that would be great semester kick-off reading for any creative writing class, and some great basic craft conversation for all writers to consider. Signing up for the bulletins is free.

One :: Taking a Second Look at Poetry

Published July 31, 2017 Posted By Denise Hill
lucille cliftonSecond Look is a section in One online poetry journal in which various writers are asked "to take a second look at poems they admire and discuss informally what they admire about the work." Some of the poems include "Woman Falling" by Franz Wright, “homage to my hips” by Lucille Clifton, "A Refusal to Mourn the Death, by Fire, of a Child in London" by Dylan Thomas, "Looking for Songs of Papusza" by Bronisława Wajs, "Celebrating Childhood" by Adonis, "Looking for my Killer" by Thylias Moss, and "Requiem" by Anna Akhmatova.

MER VOX Craft Essays

Published July 25, 2017 Posted By Denise Hill
mom egg reviewThe Mom Egg Review print literary journal about motherhood also has an online quarterly component called the Mer Vox, featuring writing, artwork, craft essays, hybrid works, and interviews. Recent craft essays include: "Women Writers, Mothers And Friendships: How We Sustain Each Other," an Interview by J.P. Howard, MER VOX Editor-at-Large, of Mireya Perez-Bustillo and Patsie Alicia Ifill; several essays on "Poetry as a Reflection of Self on the Page" curated by J.P. Howard  – "Release the Dam: A Poem is a River" by Keisha-Gaye Anderson, "Writing the Narrative Poem" by Heather Archibald, "Poetry as a Reflection of Self on the Page!" by J.P. Howard, and "Poets and Performance" by Jacqueline Johnson; and a number of writing prompts from the editors as well as other writers (Janet Hamill, Cynthia Kraman, Tsaurah Litzky).

Alternatives :: American Forests

Published July 25, 2017 Posted By Denise Hill
NewPages Guide to Alternative Magazines features publications not typically found in local chain bookstores on topics including the arts, nature and ecology, health, human rights, LGBT, and more. Among these publications is American Forests, which invites writers to submit works on the topics of outdoor recreation, environmental issues and tree-related science, adventures, forest policy, community forest programs, benefits to trees, unique ecosystems, and "Earthkeepers" - "a person or group of people, current or historic, that has worked to protect or responsibly manage a forest." See complete writers guidelines here.

New Lit on the Block :: Cold Creek Review

Published July 20, 2017 Posted By Denise Hill
cold creek reviewEver stuck your foot or hand into ice cold water and held it there, feeling the numbness of the aftershock? How about the whacky idea of a polar plunge – your whole body into an icy lake – can you imagine what that must feel like? Believe it or not, that’s the exact sensation the editors of Cold Creek Review were going for when they named their online publication. “We wanted to focus on literature and art that makes you feel paralyzed,” Editor-in-Chief for Poetry and Nonfiction Amber D. Tran tells me. “We imagine reading and reviewing our featured pieces leaves you with a sense of frozen time, like you were being submerged in a body of ice-cold water.”

Misogyny and Sexism :: Let's Talk About It

Published July 19, 2017 Posted By Denise Hill
denise duhamelFrom The Florida Review interview with Denise Duhamel, focusing on her newest collection Blowout:

TFR:
Given the times we suddenly find ourselves living in, is there even more pressure to write in the moment?

Duhamel:
Yes, absolutely. I was thinking so much about how my next book, which is not out yet, is going to be called Scald. [The book came out in February 2017, after this interview.] It’s about feminism and it’s dedicated to three different great feminists. I was so in the zeitgeist of a Hillary Clinton presidency and women, and now I feel so unmoored. But I’m so glad I wrote it when I wrote it because, while I wasn’t thinking of Hillary necessarily when I was writing it, I felt this movement towards women and the feminization of power and saving the planet. Now, we really have to stay in the moment and not stick our heads in the sand. I mean you may have to stick your head in the sand for a week to survive, but then we have to come out strong.

TFR:
I felt like I often heard people say, “We are having more conversations about race during Barak Obama’s presidency and we will talk more about gender with a female president.” Do you feel like we will talk more or less about gender given the president we ended up with?

Duhamel:
He’ll talk a lot less about gender and even his wife will say less. I was reading something just this morning about how she wants to be more like Jackie O. It’s so retro and cultural regression to the max, right? She really wants to go back to the 1960s pillbox hat and not even say anything. We are in big trouble, but I also think because this election is so egregious and Clinton didn’t lose to a man who was moderate or even a Mitt Romney or John McCain, she lost to a misogynist who calls women the worst possible names, I think women are not going to give him a pass. We are going to come back strong, especially since we had a taste of what could have been. I can’t imagine women going, Oh well, we’ll let it go.

TFR:
No.

Duhamel:
I think we’ve been letting it go for decades and centuries and I don’t think we can let it go anymore.

TFR:
I think that’s also what I admired about your book. You didn’t let it go. You talked about it.

Read the full interview on Aquifer: The Florida Review Online.

Poetry Magazine :: Asian American Poets

Published July 18, 2017 Posted By Denise Hill
timothy yuThe July/August 2017 issue of Poetry Magazine "is the product of a new partnership between the magazine and the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center, and it launches as part of the Smithsonian Asian American Literature Festival, held July 27–29, 2017, in Washington, DC." In his section of the introduction, Timothy Yu writes, "'Asian American poetry' is itself a political category. Like the term 'Asian American,' it is a category constantly redefined by new contexts; yet it is also one that demands attention to the intersections of poetics and race, and that claims value for the act of placing poems within an unfolding Asian American literary tradition."

Authors whose works are featured in this special issue include: Ocean Vuong, Chen Chen, Rajiv Mohabir, Hoa Nguyen, Kazim Ali, Khaty Xiong, Aimee Nezhukumatathil, Zubair Ahmed, Cathy Linh Che, Kimiko Hahn, John Yau, Sarah Gambito, Li-Young Lee, among others. Read the full contents here.

Lit Mag Covers :: Picks of the Week

Published July 17, 2017 Posted By Denise Hill
kenyon review"Roaring Reading," the July/August 2017 cover illustration by José Luis Merino, is a perfect compliment to the slim format of The Kenyon Review.
oneAnother slim design, "Serenity Overflowing" by Chris Ogden is the cover photo for issue 12 of One, an online journal of poetry.
ragazineThe cover of Ragazine.CC, a global online magazine of arts, information & entertainment, is a photo of the German duo Shari Vari, whose music is featured in this issue's special section, "The Summer Seven: Listen to the Best Bands from Europe."

Paterson

Published July 14, 2017 Posted By Denise Hill
paterson movie 2Thanks to Hiram Poetry Review Editor Willard Greenwood for this rather nonchalent mention in the Spring 2017 Editor's Note: ". . . with the release of Paterson, a fine film by Ohio native Jim Jarmusch, poetry is as cool as ever." Released at the end of 2016, I hadn't heard boo about this film, so set out to find it.

The film is about a former Marine - named Paterson (played by Adam Driver) - who lives a quiet, static life, driving a bus in Paterson, NJ, and writing poetry in his "secret notebook." Lines of poetry Paterson thinks and then writes appear in his handwriting across the screen intermittently throughout the movie; the poems themselves were written by poet Ron Padgett. There are references to one of Paterson's favorite poets, William Carlos Williams, with Driver delivering a delightful on-screen reading of "This is Just To Say."

Well received by critics, The New Yorker's Richard Brody wrote: "Paterson is the man of all endurance. He does his dull job without complaining and finds charm and enlightenment in the conversations of passengers and pleasure in repeated viewing of the cityscape of his route. His poetry is imbued with the modest substance of his life."

paterson bookSome have described the movie as showing the creative process of poetry writing, but I'd say it more accurately reveals the kind of life poets live, with the process of writing poetry often inseparable from the day-to-day, moment-to-moment. And that is the beauty of what Jarmusch has created. He has absolutely nailed it in Paterson.

This past week, Maria Mazziotti Gillan's book of poetry, Paterson Light and Shadow, arrived in the mail. With photographs by Mark Hillinghouse, this beautifully packaged hardcover explores Paterson, NJ, "this once great industrial city, envisioned by Alexander Hamilton as the birthplace of manufacturing in a new nation, a city now home to countless immigrants who still struggle to build lives and survive." Fans of the film, fans of Williams and his own epic poem Paterson will appreciate the creative contributions of Gillan and HIllinghouse to this mystical yet wholly down to earth place.

Recommended Reading :: Facebook Silence

Published July 13, 2017 Posted By Denise Hill
carolyn kueblerAre we still talking about our addiction to Facebook despite its evils? Apparently, yes, we still are, with New England Review Editor Carolyn Kuebler contributing a new perspective to the conversation - especially for writers. In her editorial for Issue 38.2, she addresses some of the known issues with the social media platform, and comments that "Facebook seems to present a special kind of hell for writers" in that it "offers the possibility of an audience beyond one’s circle of friends (the real kind)—and even better, an audience that responds immediately, positively, and in great numbers."

But, alas, what about when there is NO response? What about the silence of a Facebook post? "Writers have always known that theirs is a lonely art," Kuebler comments, "but after spending time on Facebook it’s as if we have to learn this all over again. We have to remember that the audience for literature is largely silent; it takes its time."

Read the full editorial here, and Kuebler's closing comment of appreciation for writers, even if it is only ever offered in silence.

Ruminate 2017 VanderMey Nonfiction Prize Winner

Published July 12, 2017 Posted By Denise Hill

The Summer 2017 issue of Ruminate features 2017 VanderMey Nonfiction Prize winners with commentary from Judge Josh MacIvor-Andersen:
sonja livingston
First Place
"Like This We Begin: An Essay in Two Photographs"
Sonja Livingston [pictured]

Second Place
"The Seven Stages of Not Eating"
Anne Boyle

Third Place
"Oh, Hi"
M. Sophia Newman

Books :: Plato Poetica

Published July 12, 2017 Posted By Katy Haas

plato poetica daniel klawitter blogLoyal readers of NewPages book reviews may recognize a familiar name on the cover of Plato Poetica, the new poetry collection published by Kelsay Books in May 2017.

Author Daniel Klawitter has shared his thoughtful opinions on poetry books for NewPages for the past couple years, and now his own poetry collection Plato Poetica is out in in the world for readers. According to Carl Sharpe, founder and editor of VerseWrights, reading the collection causes Plato to become relevant, and also invites the philosopher to become “a friend, a confidante, an advisor, whispering in our ear in the 21st century language [ . . . ]. We are brought to realize that ancient philosophy and religion are only dry subjects if we allow them to be."

Pick up copies from Kelsay Books to invite Plato into your circle of friends and add this poetry collection to your bookshelf.

Broadsided Summer 2017

Published July 11, 2017 Posted By Denise Hill
pink

Visit the new Broadsided Press website to catch up on the most recent art and poetry collaborations available for free, full-color download to post and share. May: "Backyard" - words by Melissa Fite Johnson, art by Amy Meissner; June: "My Father's Hearing Aid" - words by Adam Chiles, art by Cheryl Gross; July: "Pink" - words by Terese Svoboda, art by Lisa Sette. Each artist and poet give a brief commentary on their work, which provides a great teaching tool for classroom use. Broadsided is looking to build a section of lesson plans for using broadsides in K-12, college, community centers, etc., so if you have some best practices to share, visit their website and click on TEACH.

Books :: Beautiful Flesh

Published July 11, 2017 Posted By Katy Haas

beautiful flesh ed stephanie gschwindIn May, the Center for Literary Publishing released Beautiful Flesh: A Body of Essays edited by Stephanie G’Schwind. I find the eye-catching cover reason alone to pick up the nonfiction collection, but readers who require a little more persuading will be won over by the writing found inside. Selected from the country’s leading journals and publications, the eighteen essays build “a multi-gender, multi-ethnic body out of essays, each concerning a different part of the body.”

Contributors include Dinty W. Moore with “The Aquatic Ape,” exploring the curious design of sinuses; Peggy Shinner with “Elective,” examining the author’s “Jewish Nose”; and Matt Roberts with “Vasectomy Instruction 7,” considering the various reasons for and implications of the titular surgery. The fifteen additional contributors are Wendy Call, Steven Church, Sarah Rose Etter, Matthew Ferrence, Hester Kaplan, Sarah K. Lenz, Lupe Linares, Jody Mace, Samantha Simpson, Floyd Skloot, Danielle R. Spencer, Katherine E. Standefer, Kaitlyn Teer, Sarah Viren, and Vicki Weiqi Yang.

 Learn more at the University Press at Colorado website, where readers can rent or purchase the collection.

Start Warming Up for Poetry Marathon 2017

Published July 10, 2017 Posted By Denise Hill
warm up 2The Poetry Marathon is an annual event that challenges participants to write 24 poems in 24 hour, posting the writing online via a shared Wordpress site. This year's marathon begins at 9 AM EDT on Saturday, August 5, 2017 and ends at 9 AM on Sunday, August 6, 2017 There is also a half marathon from 9 AM until 9 PM Saturday or 9 PM until 9 AM Sunday. Registration is open from July 20 - 27.

The Poetry Marathon is run (no pun intended) by Caitlin Jans (Thomson) and Jacob Jans, two writers and web publishers living in the Pacific Northwest. There is no charge to participate in the marathon, and in 2016, over 500 writers started the marathon, but many did not finish. Clearly, this is not an activity for the faint of heart.

Last year, I participated in the half marathon and found it to be demanding, frustrating (sometimes forgetting to write my poem!), but in the end immensely rewarding. I have run marathons and half marathons, and the feeling from finishing the Poetry Marathon was very similar. I felt a huge sense of accomplishment, and at the same time, a bit of sadness that it was over. I had posted poems, offered feedback to others, received comments on mine - just like cheering each other on in a foot race. It was sad to be a part of such an intense, similarly driven community of writers, and then, just be done with them. It's what makes a person want to come back and do it again!

The Poetry Marathon website has an FAQ that answers the burning questions, like: How do I prepare for the Marathon? What if I can't be at a computer all day? What happens to the poems once I post them? and more. The site also features blog posts from previous participants who offer commentary on their marathon experience. If you're not sure about the commitment, just try it for a day on your own. See what it takes to get to the computer once an hour and write a poem (or at least write a poem per hour, because you are allowed to "catch up" at the computer if you can't get to one every hour).

This year, like last year, the organizers plan to publish a Poetry Marathon Anthology of poems written during the marathon. Some writers included in the first anthology: Sheila Sondik, Teri Harroun, Marie Moser, Raven Kingsley, Joan Leotta, J.I. Klienberg, Liam Strong, Will Jackson, Anne McMaster, Ebony Larijani, and Seema Ka.

Lit Mag Covers :: Picks of the Week

Published July 10, 2017 Posted By Denise Hill
true story resurrectionI simply can't resist this chicken on Issue 9 of True Story, Creative Nonfiction's monthly, pocket-size publication of longform nonfiction narrative.This month's story is "Resurrection" by Rebeca Dunn-Krahn. I have no idea yet what a chicken has to do with it, but I plan to find out!
themaThis Thema cover photo by Eleanor Leonne Bennett made me smile, but then as I read the theme for this issue, it made me laugh out loud: "Second Thoughts." Yup. That's the look.
writing disorderDanny Ochoa's artwork is featured on the summer 2017 cover of Writing Disorder, an online literary journal. More of his illustrations and comics are included in this issue as well.

11th Annual Poetry Postcard Festival

Published July 08, 2017 Posted By Denise Hill
august po poThe eleventh annual August Poetry Postcard Festival is open for 2017 registration - closing July 18.

For you newbies, the August PoPo Fest goes like this: You sign up. You get a list of 31 names/addresses of other people who signed up. Starting late July, you write a poem a day on a postcard and mail it off to the next person on the list, so by the end of the month, you will have (hopefully) written and sent 31 poems and (hopefully) received 31 poems.

The poems are not supposed to be pre-written or something you've been working on for months. This is an exercise is the spontaneous, the demanding, the gut-driven, the postcard inspired - whatever it is that gets you to write once a day, each day, and send it off into the world.

Last year, poems from contributors were selected for publication in the 1st Poetry Postcard Fest Anthology, 56 Days of August, Poetry Postcards, to be published October 2017.

I've done this event since it began! I don't always keep to a poem a day; sometimes I get ahead one day, or catch up another, with several poems in one day. But I try my best. The event gets me thinking of poetry in my every day, when I rarely have time for it, and writing it down - something I have time for even more rarely.

I've received poems from across the state, the country and around the globe. I've gotten postcards made from cereal boxes, some with gorgeous original artwork, and lots of the lovely tacky tourist cards from travel destinations. I have cards from "famous" poets, and some who have since become more famous, and some never signed, so I'll never know, and it hardly matters. I've gotten poetry. Sent to me directly. From strangers. Lovely, strange, absurd, and funny. Poetry.

It's an amazing event, and I hope you will take the challenge and join in this year. There is a nominal fee for the event ($10). I can only imagine the amount of work it is to run this (with 300+ people participating), and keeping up virtual space to promote it. I'm not dissuaded by the fee, knowing the extraordinary event that it is, and knowing I've spent 100 times that on conferences from which I've gotten a great deal less inspiration...anyone else?

So, please writers, wanna-bes and needs-a-kick-in-the-arsers, poetry lovers, postcard lovers - this event is for you. Join us! Registration ends July 18!

NOR The African Literary Hustle

Published July 07, 2017 Posted By Denise Hill

nor african literary hustleIssue 43 of New Orleans Review is themed "The African Literary Hustle" and opens with the editorial by Mukoma Wa Ngugi and Laura T. Murphy, "This Hustle is Not Your Grandpa's African Lit." The two issue editors examine the historical 'presentation' of African literature published in Western culture as "all too often realist, in English, and in the spirit of Chinua Achebe. But romance, science fiction, fantasy, epic, experimental poetry, satire, and political allegory all find expression in Africa, though not necessarily publication." The editors confront this disparity, "Those who are called to write often have to hustle to get recognition by writing a coming-of-age colonial encounter tale or hustle even harder to have their unique voices heard. So the post-Achebe generation writer faces all sorts of firewalls."

Thus, the call went out for this issue, and writers responded with the editors hoping "to provoke some interesting and unpredictable writing and thinking that would reflect and respond to the spirit of the hustle." Oddly enough, the editors note, "eighty percent of the submissions were from white non-African-identifying writers who thought they could hustle their way into a volume of African literature and had no qualms about it." Seriously.

The editors close on the comment, "But what is African literature? Is there, can there be, was there ever and African literature? In asking you have answered your question. African literature is a question. It is an open question that invites, and has to keep on inviting, different geographies, languages and forms."

Thus, this issue of New Orleans Review: The African Literary Hustle.

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