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Published October 22, 2012
The book publishing company Two Dollar Radio is starting a new project: a biannual print magazine called Frequencies. “We never set out to duplicate what others are doing and already doing well,” says Editor Eric Obenauf. “Artful essays cover an area that we felt wasn't being sufficiently represented. With some inspiration from Occupy Wall Street, we wanted to champion work that celebrated the individual through both voice and vision. We're billing Frequencies as a grungier, less self-righteous Harper's.”

Obenauf says that readers can expect to find artful essays that “challenge the current nonfiction prescription.” Each issue has cover art and illustrations by John Gagliano. “The idea was to create a really taut arena,” says Obenauf, “so there are no empty calories in the form of music or book reviews, no random filler just to increase page count, which ideally totals an attractive space for writers to showcase their work.”

Alongside Obenauf is the interviews editor, Emily Pullen who, in the first issue, interviews poet Anne Carson. Other writers in the first issue include Blake Butler, Joshua Cohen, Tracy Rose Keaton, and Scott McClanahan with photography by Morgan Kendall.

The second issue "will feature Sara Finnerty on ghosts, Roxane Gay on issues of belonging in middle class black America, Alex Jung on the gay sex tourist trade in Thailand, Kate Zambreno on actress/director Barbara Loden, and more."

Frequencies accepts submissions on a rolling basis; completed submissions can be sent via email as attachments. Frequencies does pay for published work. Please see the website for submission information.
Published October 16, 2012
Lunch Ticket is a new online biannual magazine that evokes “school, hanging with friends, having interesting discussions over bologna sandwiches.” The name comes from a program Antioch University Los Angeles used to have in which a new student would be paired with an experienced student for lunch and given a “lunch ticket.” Current Editor-in-Chief Lise Quintana says that since Antioch is one of the top 5 low-residency MFA programs in the country and didn’t have its own literary magazine, there was a clear need to start Lunch Ticket. “[It] exists both to showcase great literary talent and to support Antioch University Los Angeles’s mission of social justice,” Quintana says.

She says that you can expect to find “interviews with interesting and important authors (our premier issue had an interview with Natasha Trethewey, poet laureate of the United States), essays on social justice issues, and great writing by authors from all over.”

The staff are all current MFA students at Antioch. “We know what it’s like putting yourself out there,” says Quintana, “and we appreciate the support we’ve been shown.” The editors vary per issue, but currently the editor-in-chief is Quintana, the fiction editor is Kathleen Rohr, the Writing for Young People editor is Kristen Schroer, the creative nonfiction editor is Wendy Fontaine, the poetry editor is Janice Luo, and the art editor is Audrey Mandelbaum.

The first issue features interviews by Natasha Trethewey, Gregory Boyle, Rick Moody, and Francesca Lia Block; essays by Naomi Benaron and Nancy L. Conyers; fiction by Jennifer A. Orth-Veillon, Jessica Pitchford, Diana Payne, Kyle Hemmings, Jenny Dunning, Terry Sanville, and LaToya Watkins; creative nonfiction by Andy Johnson (nominated for a Pushcart Prize), Mark Brazaitis, Sion Dayson, and John Calderazzo; Writing for Young People by G. Neri; and poetry by Andrei Guruianu, Hugh Behm-Steinberg, James Valdis, Nate Pritts, Martin Ott and John F. Buckley, Sheila Black, George Bishop, Yim Tang Wong, R L Swihart, Derek Pollard, Eleanor Levine, Lois Marie Harrod, Dina Hardy, Ricky Garni, Valentina Cano, and Gabriel Cabrera.

In the future, the staff would like “a more ambitious art section, incorporating more writing about art.” The would also like to create a best-of anthology as a print-on-demand hardcopy book.

The current reading period ends at the end of this month and is reopened in March, although writers and artists can send their submissions at any time. Submissions can be sent through Submittable.

Published October 15, 2012
Blue Lyra Review is a new online venture that publishes poetry, nonfiction, translations, and artistic imagery three times a year, with a print issue at the end of December (beginning in 2013). “Our aim,” says M. E. Silverman, poetry and art editor, “is to bring together the voices of writers and artists from a diverse array of backgrounds, paying special homage to Jewish writers and other communities that are historically underrepresented in literary magazines.”

Silverman tells the story of the origin of the magazine’s name: “One of the most difficult decisions was coming up with a name that was not already taken, and had a free domain available! So after inquiring with some acquaintances and colleagues, I finally stumbled onto an idea while watching my daughter play Rocket Girl. I have always loved blues and jazz and the color blue. I loved the echo of sound in ‘review’ and 'blue', but I also liked the color for the connection to Israel. But Blue Review? Then I remembered the story of Lyra. The Greeks believed after Orpheus died, Zeus sent an eagle to get his lyre and then Zeus placed both in the sky. Now it is one of the 88 constellations (according to International Astronomical Union) with the second brightest star in the northern hemisphere. One can only hope to strive for so much, and I wish all of our acceptances soar so high!”

Silverman—along with Adrienne Ross Scanlan, nonfiction editor; Nancy Naomi Carlson, translation editor; B. Kari Moore, fiction editor; Lenore Weiss, copy editor; and Laura Hong, web editor—will present “a beautiful array of diverse voices” within the publication.

The first issue includes poetry from Marge Piercy, Lyn Lifshin, John Wood, Jeff Friedman, Gene Doty, Peter Serchuk, Jeannie Hall Gailey, and others; essays from Terry Persun, Neil Mathison, Sarah Corbett Morgan, Sue Eisenfeld, and Louis Bourgeois; and artistic work by Robin Grotke and Ginn Conn.

Blue Lyra Review accepts submissions through Submittable but is not looking for horror, westerns, anything offensive, or mixed media art. Currently, they are considering book reviews of Jewish poets; should you be interested, contact the editors through the website.
Published September 10, 2012
Swamp Biscuits and Tea, a new quarterly online magazine, publishes magic realism, literary fiction, slipstream, noir, surrealist, bizarre, weird tale, experimental, science fiction, absurdist, mystery, hard-boiled, quirky, fantasy, and cross-genre. Editor Henry Sane says, “there’s no deep or exciting story behind the name.” He and Co-Editor Joseph German tried to come up with something that “would capture a certain style—a certain mental image, something that would get people interested and get their imaginations flowing while at the same time exuding our aesthetic of strangeness and wonder.”

Sane says that readers can expect to find “good, imaginative fiction.” He says, “Nearly every story we publish will offer some speculative element, whether subtle or outlandish. So if you like weird—whether it's hidden comfortably in the shadows of a familiar environment, or springing at you like a tentacle-haired wildebeest robot—we think we'll have something to satisfy your cravings. One of our goals is also to offer readers a series of unforgettable tales, which may be because they are either strange, beautiful, or just too damn engrossing to put down.”

“Joseph and I have always liked the same kind of stuff,” says Sane, “whether it be in art, music, film or literature. Naturally, after many years of profoundly weird conversations, we decided it was time to collaborate on some kind of creative project. As to the nature of the project, that was still uncertain. That is, until one day when inspiration struck me, telling me to create a fiction magazine. ‘We'll get to name it, design it, and read stories to create our own style,’ I said. ‘Brilliant,’ said Joseph. Since that fateful day, the idea hasn't lost even an ounce of momentum.”

And if that momentum continues, Sane says that they will consider an annual print issue, cataloguing the best stories of the past year’s worth of issues. “One hope is that we’ll eventually be able to move into full print publication, with eBook, Kindle, etc. as additional options for readers,” he says. “If things go swimmingly, we hope we can one day pay our contributors, and (fingers crossed) make this our livelihood.”

The first issue of Swamp Biscuits and Tea features Alex Aro, C. E. Hyun, Beth Spencer, Marc Lowe, and Adam C. Richardson. Submissions are accepted year-round through email.
Published July 17, 2012
The Liner is a new annual print publication that publishes fiction, poetry, non-fiction, and visaul art from both established and emerging artists and writers. Since The Liner is a transatlantic collaboration," says Co-Editor Gloria Kim, "we were envisioning crossing water when thinking of possible names. The Liner was a good fit." Kim says that she and Co-Editor Emma Silverthorn threw around the idea of staring their own magazine while "attending a summer literary festival in Cornwall, England, in between hearing writers, getting lost in garden mazes, and rolling down Port Eliot’s hills. As writers ourselves," she says, "we wanted to feature perspectives, whether in writing or in art, that compelled us to create more."

Kim says readers can expect to find "a high calibre, eclectic mix of original works from both established and emerging artists and writers. Plus our Thornkim Questionnaire, 21 revealing questions answered by all of our contributors in the back of the magazine." In the future, they hope to become a biannual publication. Kim also adds that they are proud of the scope and international flavor of the magazine and hope to continue on with that, "gaining more worldwide distributors as well as contributors."

The first issue includes writers Maura Dooley, Blake Morrison, Sherard Harrington, William Doreski, Lisa Wong Macabasco, Kenneth Pobo, Caitlin E. Thomson, and Gina Zupsich and visual artists Dave Carswell, Christopher Daniels, Benjamin Edmiston, and Dominic Silverthorn.

The Liner
's next issue will have an epistolary theme. "We want your correspondences, real or imagined, scandalous or humorous, digital or paper," says Kim. The deadline to submit is October 21, 2012.
Published July 16, 2012
BLACKBERRY is a new quarterly magazine available in print and as digital copy that "aims to be a premier literary magazine featuring black women writers and artists. Its goal is to expose readers to the diversity of the black woman’s experience and strengthen the black female voice in both the mainstream and independent markets." The magazine features non-fiction, fiction, all forms of poetry, photography and artwork.

Editor Alisha Sommer said that the name was inspired from the phrase "the blacker the berry, the sweeter the juice" when she was wandering around the French Quarter. "BLACKBERRY: a magazine is born out of my passion to giving others a voice," she says. "It will give African-American women a new platform to share their art. Our voice is one that is often silenced, and BLACKBERRY: a magazine will be our megaphone." During a visit to the New Orleans Museum of Art, she "disappointed that a city with such a large black population did not have a significant representation of black artists. The feelings I felt that day," she says, "were the same feelings that have been sitting with me for the past year: disappointment and confusion. After having a conversation with a friend about the need to help women of color gain access and give them exposure, I decided that it was time to act."

The first issue features art and photography by Danielle Boodoo-Fortuné, Jessica Valoris, Jessica Serran, Danielle Scrugs, Eleanor Leonne Bennett, Danielle Scrugs, Keondra Bills, and Margaret Jacobsen; non-fiction by Ekua Adisa and Nikita T. Mitchell; poetry by Nia Hampton, Jessica Valoris, Raquelle Mayoral, Amina Ross, Rose Smith, Arianna Payson, Celeste Jona, Athena Dixon, Althea Romeo-Mark, Leesa Cross-Smith, Keondra Bills, Keyaira Olivia Kelly, Artemis Steakley-Freeman, Samantha BanDavad and Stephania Byrd; and prose by Debra Stone and Jessica Lynne.

Submissions are accepted through Submittable and should be inspired by the issue's theme. The next theme is "Belief," and submissions are due by August 1, 2012.

Published July 10, 2012
Mixitini Matrix is a new "multigenre, multidisciplinary journal of creative collaboration." Published twice a year online only, they feature fiction, nonfiction, poetry, short plays, and visual art that has been created by two or more people. Editor Leslie LaChance describes the name of the name of the magazine as the following:

Mixitini – noun. 1. a portmanteau word intended to suggest spirited concoction. 2. a spirited concoction of diminutive proportions.

Matrix – noun. 1. the birthplace of spirited concoction. 2. stuff that dreams are made of. 3. a place where something grows.

Collaboration – noun 1. the state of being in cahoots with. 2. serendipity.

LaChance and the other editor, Mattie Davenport, "are fascinated when creative minds work in collaboration with other creative minds," says LaChance. "We are charmed by serendipity and awed by creative synergy. Our magazine seeks to celebrate the connectedness of collaborative art in a seemingly fragmented world." She says that readers can expect to find work from emerging and established writers and artists. "Readers may find a traditional ekphrastic poem or a nature photograph published in the same issue as an experimental media collaboration or an email chain poem. We seek to expand the definition of collaboration, to acknowledge the collaborative in its broadest sense, so we aim to publish work which will do exactly that."

The first issue features Marilyn Kallet, Wayne White, Brian Griffin, Jack Rentfro, Laura Still, Dorothee Lang, Julia Davies, Steve Wing, Joe Kendrick, Rachel Joiner, JeFF Stumpo, Leonardo Ramirez, Henri Michaux, Darren Jackson, William Henderson and Clint Alexander.

Mixitini Matrix hopes to continue publishing twice a year and possibly moving to quarterly. LaChance says they hope to "eventually offer high quality printed chapbook and broadside editions of our contributors' work."

Submissions are accepted until August 31 through Submittable for the next issue. All work should address, in some way, the concept of collaboration.
Published July 09, 2012
Paper Nautilus, a new annual print magazine, is named after the tiny species of octopus with the same name. "They're born by hatching out of very delicate eggs that look like nautilus sea shells," says Editor-in-Chief Lisa Mangini. "It's said to be rare to find one of these shells intact, since they're so fragile. When I learned about this animal, it just seemed like the perfect fit for what I would want in a literary publication: the rare instance of finding something intact, and also the necessity of breaking through the thing that encases us so we can live our lives. It just seemed like the perfect emblem for what a writer does." She says she wanted to start the literary magazine to create another space "for all that fine work so it could be enjoyed."

Working with Assistant Poetry Editor Joey Gould, Mangini publishes a variety of poetry and fiction. "We also have a section we call 'aphorisms,' which is literature that can be fit into 160 characters or less," she says. "We're very open-minded, and make a point of trying to see beyond our own aesthetic and appreciate the strengths and merits of a piece that's outside our style. And I think most work is also enjoyable for a reader who may not be a writer; the majority of works in Paper Nautilus are accessible to someone who's just reading for pleasure."

Mangini says they just launched a chapbook contest and would like to continue with this venture, publishing one to two chapbooks a year. In addition, she thought it would be neat to include a blog about craft, revision, and technique. "We are looking at expanding into digital issues as well," she says, "but it may be some time before we fully launch that page. But we do have some featured pieces accessible at our website."

The first issue includes poetry from Carol Berh, Lisa J. Cihlar, Trent Busch, Tobi Cogswell, James Connaster, Gregory Crosby, Barbara Daniels, Lori Desrosiers, Nandini Dhar, William Doreski, Kate Falvey, Marta Ferguson, Lauren Fisk, Ryan Fitzgerald, Ruth Foley, Ian Ganassi, Howie Good, Vivianne Grabinski, George Guida Kyle Hemings, Marianna Hofer, Paul Hostovsky, Nathaniel Hunt, Danielle Jones-Pruett, Tessa Kale, P. Kobylarz, Deirdre LaPenna, Henry W. Leung, Nancy Long, Terry Martin, John McKernan, Michael P. McManus,Colleen Michaels, Raphael Miguel Montes, Rick Murphy, Dianne Nelson Oberhansly, Janet Parlato, Simon Perchik, Marjorie Power, Megan Cowen, Charles Rafferty, Sarah Rizzuto, Jay Rubin, Meredith Sticker, Elizabeth Szewczyk, Meredith Trede, Edwina Trentham, David Walker, Eric Wescott, and William Kelley Woolfitt as well as fiction from Jessica Barksdale, Darren Cormier, James Fowler, Tim Parrish, Jeanette Samuels, Clint Smith, April Sopkin, and Adrian Stumpp.

Submissions are accepted year-round through Paper Nautilus's online submission manager. Simultaneous submissions are fine as long as the writer withdraws the work upon acceptance elsewhere.
Published July 03, 2012
Editor David Svenson says that within the pages of The New Poet, a new online magazine, readers will find "strong, vivid poems that utilize imagistic and narrative styles."

"As a poet," says Svenson, "I read to not only discover new work and trends, but also for inspiration. I started The New Poet to witness exciting developments in poetry firsthand and to share these discoveries with others. I also understand the value of encouraging others to keep writing. With three issues a year and a mission to find new and exciting work, The New Poet also serves as inspiration to other writers to push their own limits."

The first issue features poetry from Wendy Carlisle, Paul Hostovsky, Allie Marini Batts, Andrea Potos, Lana Rakhman, Alexis Sellas, Tim Suermondt, Tim Tomlinson, Theresa Williams, and Axel Wright. And the second issue features Kate Bernadette Benedict, Thomas J. Erickson, Caitlin McLean, Jesse Millner, Sue Morgan, John Palen, Ned Randle, Colin Sargent, Martin Willitts Jr., and Laura Madeline Wiseman.

Currently, The New Poet publishes only poetry--of all kinds--but hopes to include book reviews and interviews in the future. Submissions for issue 3 are currently being accepted through Submittable.
Published June 27, 2012


The Ilanot Review, published online biannually, is affiliated with the creative writing program at Bar-Ilan University. Editor Janice Weizman says that Ilanot also means “young trees” in Hebrew—“which is a nice metaphor for new writing.” Marcela Sulak, Nadia Jacobson, Karen Marron, Jane Medved, and Karen Boxenhorn also serve as editors for the magazine.

“Originally, we wanted to give a platform for English writing coming out of Israel,” Weizman says. “Today, we accept writing from anywhere in the world.” She explains that readers can expect to find “fresh and striking prose and poetry, English translations of literature from other languages—particularly Hebrew but other languages as well—interviews with published poets and writers, and thought provoking themed issues.”

The Ilanot Review’s first publication includes well known names such as Mark Mirsky, Joan Leegant, Michael Collier, E. Ethlebert Miller, and Gerald Stern as well as several emerging poets and writers. “We launch every issue with a public reading by contributors in fun and memorable venues,” Weizman says.

Writers can submit to The Ilanot Review through Submittable through October 30, 2012 for the next themed issue: “Foreign Bodies.”
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