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Published April 10, 2017
big muddyPhotograph "Paula/Window #1" by Roger Mullins on the cover of v16 i2 of Big Muddy: A Journal of the Mississippi River Valley inspired this week's theme of lit mag covers.
arroyoA detail of "The History of Nature" by Brad Kunkle on the Spring 2017 issue of Arroyo is from his Light & Leaf series, paintings "embellished with genuine gold and silver leaf, which reflects light in a room differently than paint.Therefore, they can appear contrastive and unique when the point of view or source of light has changed."
pembrokeAnd for a dose of humor, Issue #49 of Pembroke Magazine features a photograph taken by Editor Jessica Pitchford at the annual John Blue Cotton Festival in Laurinburg, North Carolina. Love it.
Published April 03, 2017
irish pagesEditor Chris Agee included a handwritten note with v9 n2 of Irish Pages, "This issue is already highly controversial. . . " Why? The focus: "Israel, Islam & the West" with feature content: Gerard McCarthy on the refugee crisis in Greece; An unpublished survivor’s account of Bergen Belsen; “A Trial” by Hubert Butler; Writings on Iran, Bosnia and Islam; Avi Shlaim on “Israel and the Arrogance of Power”; Dervla Murphy’s “Hasbara in Action”; John McHugo on Syria; Chris Agee on “Troubled Belfast”; Ghazels of Hafez; Lara Marlowe on Mahmoud Darwish; New poems on the Middle East by Seán Lysaght, Naomi Shihab Nye, Ciarán O’Rourke & Cathal Ó Searcaigh; and “I am Belfast”, a photographic portfolio by Mark Cousins.
Published March 15, 2017
charles jensenDear America,

A cento of Adrienne Rich

You’re beginning to float free
Toward a new kind of love
Burning itself, burning down
The blueprint of a life.

I wanted to choose words that even you
Intend to refuse shelter
With a lie. And each
A beautiful tumor
Feeding on everything.
. . . 

[Read the rest and listen to the poet read his own work on Terrain.org]
Published March 09, 2017
starlight errorDiode celebrates ten years of publishing "electropositive poetry": poetry that "excites and energizes"; poetry that uses language that "crackles and sparks." Issue 10.1 features works from over 40 poets as well as two full-length collections, Starlight & Error by Remica Bingam-Risher and quitter by Paula Cisewski, several chapbooks, interviews and reviews. All of Diode's is available for readers to enjoy online. 
Published March 01, 2017
rattle v55 spring 2017 blogIssue #55 (Spring 2017) of Rattle includes a selection of poems on the theme "Civil Servants." "The collection features seventeen civil servants — poets who have worked for various government agencies, including the EPA, the FDA, the CIA, the Census Bureau, and many more," write the editors. "Apparently working for the public produces a dry sense of humor, because many of the poems lean sardonic. These poets are also smart and down-to-earth, and just may restore your faith in bureaucracy." Some of the writers included: Lisa Badner, Dane Cervine, A.M. Juster, Bruce Neidt, Pepper Trail, Jane Wheeler, John Yohe. See a full list of contributors here.
Published February 27, 2017
copper nickelEditor Wayne Miller has announced several changes to Copper Nickel with its recent re-launch, including paying contributors: "starting with issue 24, we'll be paying $30 per printed page. (We wish it could be more!)" Indeed, it is more than nothing, which is a great step for any literary publication to be able to take. Additionally, issue 24 of Copper Nickel includes a flash fiction portfolio featuring 22 works selected by Fiction Editors Teague Bohlen and Joanna Luloff. Cover image: "Tape Loops" by Eleanor King.
Published February 15, 2017
nick potter db 24"It bears acknowledging that Drunken Boat 24 arrives in the wake of a substantial loss," opens Nick Potter's editorial to the comics section of the newest issue. "Amid the varied responses," he writes, "I’ve noticed a subset of my friends on Facebook who have updated their profile pictures to a black square. In our increasingly globalized, increasingly visual culture, this act seems intuitive, marking absence, marking erasure, marking the digital equivalence of donning black in mourning, marking a kind of death. In comics, the filled-black panel has often been used as contextual shorthand for death—a kind of visual euphemism in the structural language of the form."

Potter goes on to offer several panels of black squares, acknowledging the loss of famous people, those whose lives taken made news for their injustice, and for victims of the Pulse Nightclub Massacre, as well as a couple personal losses from Potter's family. "And so," he closes, "as we’ve endured so many black panels this year, it’s worth noting that, in comics, all panels, black or otherwise, are given meaning by the panels that surround them. And how we choose to fill those panels, as artists and patrons, comprises the politics with which we envision humanity."
Published February 14, 2017
massachusetts review musicExecutive Editor Jim Hicks opens the newest issue of The Massachusetts Review: The Music Issue with this from his introduction: "For this particular quarterly, given that 'public affairs' is the kicker to our moniker, the first reaction of readers might well be, 'Why?' Certainly if you think of music as entertainment, as remedy or therapy, you might not see such a theme as urgent. And yet what social movement, what new political formation, hasn’t had its unforgettable soundtrack? Where, after all, do those in the struggle find the force and inspiration to keep moving forward, to get up, stand up, in this world full of tunnels and only occasional light? What brings them together, what lifts their voices, what beats the drum?"

The front cover features "The Music Issue, 2016" created for The Massachusetts Review  by Bianca Stone, and a full list of contributors with access to some of the works can be found here.
Published February 07, 2017
Schrand BrandonBrevity: A Journal of Concise Literary Nonfiction January 2017 features three new craft essays: "The Essay and the Art of Equivocation" in which Brandon R. Schrand [pictured] considers our ability to equivocate artfully in the essay; "Truth & Delight: Resisting the Seduction of Surfaces" in which Peter Selgin examines the need to resist total seduction by sounds and surfaces; and  "Beyond 'Craft for Craft’s Sake': Nonfiction and Social Justice" with Rachel Tolliver and M. Sausun discussing nonfiction and social justice in the new political era. Brevity's full content can be read online.
Published February 02, 2017
seneca reviewThe fall 2016 issue of Seneca Review is a book of poems, Deborah Tall’s final collection, Afterings. "It is a remarkable volume by a poet and nonfiction writer at the peak of her powers. Eavan Boland has called it 'an essential collection,' and Mary Ruefle says the poems have 'not what is to be expected – hints of cessation – but an overwhelming sense of blossoming.'" Deborah Tall edited Seneca Review  for twenty-five years, until 2006. This winter, Seneca Review  will include a copy of Deborah Tall's final book of nonfiction, A Family of Strangers, with any new subscription to the journal.
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