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Published September 12, 2018

The Fall 2018 Still Point Arts Quarterly is a special issue titled "Four Freedoms Reinterpreted." Editor Christine Brooks Cote writes in her introduction that the concept was inspired by Franklin Roosevelt's 1941 speech in which he specifically identified freedom of speech, freedom of worship, freedom from want, and freedom from fear. She explains:

still points fall 2018

"Two years later The Saturday Evening Post  published four paintings by Norman Rockwell, each devoted to one of the Four Freedoms. There were accompanying essays written by respected writers of the day. Now seventy-five years later, it seems appropriate to revisit these 'essential' freedoms and think about where we stand today. . . This special issue is filled with art and writing from people who have something to say about freedom. It is both a celebration of who we are as a country and a cry for attention to the ways in which the foundations of our country are threatened. I hope you will be moved by this outpouring of love for our country and concern for our future."

Readers can view a generous sample of the publication here.

Published September 04, 2018

Edify Fiction is seeking submissions for two upcoming themed issues. For the December 2018 issue, they are accepting pieces surrounding the topics of Christmas, holiday, and winter. Their January 2019 issue looks at all things teen - from teen writers to bullying, peer pressure, emotions, first love, best friends - and more.

angela meekWhen I asked Edify Fiction Editor Angela Meek [pictured] about the teen-themed CFS, she replied, “I was inspired recently to make a themed issue about teen concerns because of a story we recently accepted that incorporated the author's own experiences as a teen and how those challenges shaped him. As a mom with a teen who is starting to stretch those wings and find her way in the world, I thought it would be a good time to have a dedicated issue.”

The call is a broad one, and Meek says they want it that way: “We're pretty open as long as it is has a teen flavor to it - growing up, relationships, bullying, sports, siblings, dealing with parents, dealing with living in a divorced family, acceptance, school - you name it. As long as it is related to teens in some manner, any topic is welcomed. We also would love to feature as many teen writers as possible - from never-been-published to those writers who know their way around the writing world.”

For more information, check out Edify Fiction on Facebook and Twitter. Their general submissions guidelines can be found here, which apply for the themed issues as well. Deadline for both these themed issues is October 31, 2018.


Published August 29, 2018
terrain galvinI think most of us know some old home - a beautiful relic of an era long gone by that we believe holds family stories as well as secrets. And, sadly, we also watch many such structures rot away, lost in court battles or just cost of upkeep, often times being razed with whole histories erased with them. Georgia-based writer and documentary photographer Kathleen Galvin followed one such home for over a decade and tells the story of her attempts to salvage its history in Temptation to Trespass: A Photo Essay published in Terrain.org: A Journal of the Built + Natural Environments. Though the end result may not provide all the stories and secrets, such efforts give a last chance, perhaps a final story, to these great community structures.
Published August 28, 2018

ovenbirds coverWordrunner eChapbooks publishes an annual themed anthology, taking submissions just prior to publication, but also then publishes two e-chapbooks of fiction each year. While they have a submission fee, they are also a paying market (with a better return than I've been getting for playing the lottery lately). "Our aim is to make high quality writing available free or at very low cost, much like the original chapbooks that were hawked in the streets of 18th and 19th century London for pennies," the editors note. Yet web publishing opens up all kinds of new options for digital-aged readers: "In many issues, hyperlinks to photos, videos, background articles, maps, poetry, and artwork add new dimensions to the online reading experience."

The current chapbook is Ovenbirds and Other Stories by Dorene O'Brien, with a full archive of previous e-chapbooks and anthologies going back to 2008. Submissions for the spring anthology will open January 1 with submissions for the e-chapbook fiction series running from May 1 - June 30. Lots of time to get your manuscripts ready!

Published August 16, 2018

nimrod blogLast week, Nimrod International Journal announced exciting news for writers: they are now a paying market. For work printed in the two upcoming 2019 issues, the editors will pay $10/page with a maximum of $200, visual artists will receive $10 per image used, and all contributors will continue to receive two copies of the issue in which their work appears.

Writers whose work is selected through the journal's two annual contests (Nimrod Literary Awards and the Francine Ringold Awards for New Writers) will also receive the new payment, though the monetary prizes for winners will remain the same.

Learn more and submit your own work at Nimrod’s website.

Published August 15, 2018

carve"Rejection doesn't have to be the end of the line" according to Carve Magazine. To which end, they include the coolest column in each issue: Decline/Accept, with commentary from a writer whose work, originally declined by Carve, has been accepted elsewhere. The author writes about their rejection/revision/acceptance, a snippet of the original work is included with Carve editors' comments as well the snippet revised (if applicable) along with editors' comments from the publication that accepted the work.

The Summer 2018 issue features Kelly Hill, whose story "The Bearded Loon" was published in the July 2017 issue of Upstreet. Hill comments on the rejection and subsequent acceptance, "I've been doing this writing thing long enough to understand that the story I set out to tell is not always the story I write or the story that others ultimately read. I'm always thankful for good feedback from insightful readers, although any feedback can be useful if it helps you mentally justify your stylistic choices."

Decline/Accept is a great craft component for readers and writers alike, and you can see a full listing with links out (when available) to the final published work here.

Published August 09, 2018
That’s what writers do: we start over. For a writer, every day is a new day with a new beginning. Even if we are writing an essay or a book chapter we have been working on for days or months—or years!—we face our notebook or keyboard not really knowing what is going to happen to our work next. We may think and hope that we know, but we really don’t—at least until we are deep into the story. Even then, we are invariably surprised.

Lee Gutkind from his What's the Story introduction to the 4th Annual Readers' Choice Theme issue of Creative Nonfiction - Starting Over: Hitting the Reset Button

Published July 25, 2018

ryan thorpeIKEA CHOICES
by Ryan Thorpe

The family of three examines
the dining table for four,
calculating out their marriage
prospect. They are unsure
of the wood’s soft shine,
doubting it will survive past
two winters. . . 

[Love the way this poem ends. Read the rest in the Apple Valley Review online Spring 2018 issue.]

Published July 23, 2018

glimmer trainAfter nearly 30 years of continuous publication, Glimmer Train has announced that they will be closing shop after this next year of publication. Submissions are still being accepted to finish out with issue #106, but after that, sisters Linda Swanson-Davies and Susan Burmeister-Brown – or as we call them, The Glimmer Train Sisters – plan to retire the publication entirely.

While they have received many offers and inquiries to let others take over the renowned journal, The Sisters had already decided against this option. In a form letter response to such inquiries, The Sisters. . . 

Read more...
Published July 18, 2018

rick stapletonIn addition to celebrating its tenth anniversay of publication, the newest issue of Canada's Hamilton Arts & Letters (11.1) is also a celebration of Bertrand Russell and the 50th Anniversary of the Russell Archives.

Guest Editor Rick Stapleton [pictured] writes in his introduction, "In 1968 McMaster University purchased the first instalment of the archives of Bertrand Russell (1872-1970), a vast collection of letters, manuscripts, photographs, books and other personal material of one of the 20th century’s greatest philosophers, writers, and peace activists. At the time, the 96-year-old Russell was in need of funds to support his peace work, and McMaster’s university librarian, William Ready—renowned for his ‘buccaneering’ style of acquiring collections—was able to bid successfully for the archives. Now, 50 years later, we celebrate that event with this special issue of Hamilton Arts & Letters magazine, devoted to Bertrand Russell."

The issue is packed with poetry, artwork, and articles, including an Interview with Kenneth Blackwell, the original Bertrand Russell archivist by Wade Hemsworth; “'I Have Never Been a Complete Pacifist': Bertrand Russell on Peace and War in the Twentieth Century" by Andrew Bone; "Bertrand Russell and The Revolution in Twentieth Century Philosophy" by Nicholas Griffin; "A Rivalry? – Russell’s Lovers, Lady Ottoline Morrell and Lady Constance Malleson" by Sheila Turcon; "Hanging out with Bertrand Russell" by Terry Fallis; and "Bertrand Russell: Remembering a Public Intellectual for Our Time" by Henry A. Giroux.

Hamilton Arts & Letters is an online publication; the full issue can be accessed here.

 

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