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Published July 19, 2017
denise duhamelFrom The Florida Review interview with Denise Duhamel, focusing on her newest collection Blowout:

TFR:
Given the times we suddenly find ourselves living in, is there even more pressure to write in the moment?

Duhamel:
Yes, absolutely. I was thinking so much about how my next book, which is not out yet, is going to be called Scald. [The book came out in February 2017, after this interview.] It’s about feminism and it’s dedicated to three different great feminists. I was so in the zeitgeist of a Hillary Clinton presidency and women, and now I feel so unmoored. But I’m so glad I wrote it when I wrote it because, while I wasn’t thinking of Hillary necessarily when I was writing it, I felt this movement towards women and the feminization of power and saving the planet. Now, we really have to stay in the moment and not stick our heads in the sand. I mean you may have to stick your head in the sand for a week to survive, but then we have to come out strong.

TFR:
I felt like I often heard people say, “We are having more conversations about race during Barak Obama’s presidency and we will talk more about gender with a female president.” Do you feel like we will talk more or less about gender given the president we ended up with?

Duhamel:
He’ll talk a lot less about gender and even his wife will say less. I was reading something just this morning about how she wants to be more like Jackie O. It’s so retro and cultural regression to the max, right? She really wants to go back to the 1960s pillbox hat and not even say anything. We are in big trouble, but I also think because this election is so egregious and Clinton didn’t lose to a man who was moderate or even a Mitt Romney or John McCain, she lost to a misogynist who calls women the worst possible names, I think women are not going to give him a pass. We are going to come back strong, especially since we had a taste of what could have been. I can’t imagine women going, Oh well, we’ll let it go.

TFR:
No.

Duhamel:
I think we’ve been letting it go for decades and centuries and I don’t think we can let it go anymore.

TFR:
I think that’s also what I admired about your book. You didn’t let it go. You talked about it.

Read the full interview on Aquifer: The Florida Review Online.
Published July 18, 2017
timothy yuThe July/August 2017 issue of Poetry Magazine "is the product of a new partnership between the magazine and the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center, and it launches as part of the Smithsonian Asian American Literature Festival, held July 27–29, 2017, in Washington, DC." In his section of the introduction, Timothy Yu writes, "'Asian American poetry' is itself a political category. Like the term 'Asian American,' it is a category constantly redefined by new contexts; yet it is also one that demands attention to the intersections of poetics and race, and that claims value for the act of placing poems within an unfolding Asian American literary tradition."

Authors whose works are featured in this special issue include: Ocean Vuong, Chen Chen, Rajiv Mohabir, Hoa Nguyen, Kazim Ali, Khaty Xiong, Aimee Nezhukumatathil, Zubair Ahmed, Cathy Linh Che, Kimiko Hahn, John Yau, Sarah Gambito, Li-Young Lee, among others. Read the full contents here.
Published July 13, 2017
carolyn kueblerAre we still talking about our addiction to Facebook despite its evils? Apparently, yes, we still are, with New England Review Editor Carolyn Kuebler contributing a new perspective to the conversation - especially for writers. In her editorial for Issue 38.2, she addresses some of the known issues with the social media platform, and comments that "Facebook seems to present a special kind of hell for writers" in that it "offers the possibility of an audience beyond one’s circle of friends (the real kind)—and even better, an audience that responds immediately, positively, and in great numbers."

But, alas, what about when there is NO response? What about the silence of a Facebook post? "Writers have always known that theirs is a lonely art," Kuebler comments, "but after spending time on Facebook it’s as if we have to learn this all over again. We have to remember that the audience for literature is largely silent; it takes its time."

Read the full editorial here, and Kuebler's closing comment of appreciation for writers, even if it is only ever offered in silence.
Published July 07, 2017

nor african literary hustleIssue 43 of New Orleans Review is themed "The African Literary Hustle" and opens with the editorial by Mukoma Wa Ngugi and Laura T. Murphy, "This Hustle is Not Your Grandpa's African Lit." The two issue editors examine the historical 'presentation' of African literature published in Western culture as "all too often realist, in English, and in the spirit of Chinua Achebe. But romance, science fiction, fantasy, epic, experimental poetry, satire, and political allegory all find expression in Africa, though not necessarily publication." The editors confront this disparity, "Those who are called to write often have to hustle to get recognition by writing a coming-of-age colonial encounter tale or hustle even harder to have their unique voices heard. So the post-Achebe generation writer faces all sorts of firewalls."

Thus, the call went out for this issue, and writers responded with the editors hoping "to provoke some interesting and unpredictable writing and thinking that would reflect and respond to the spirit of the hustle." Oddly enough, the editors note, "eighty percent of the submissions were from white non-African-identifying writers who thought they could hustle their way into a volume of African literature and had no qualms about it." Seriously.

The editors close on the comment, "But what is African literature? Is there, can there be, was there ever and African literature? In asking you have answered your question. African literature is a question. It is an open question that invites, and has to keep on inviting, different geographies, languages and forms."

Thus, this issue of New Orleans Review: The African Literary Hustle.

Published June 29, 2017
southampton reviewThe Southampton Review Editor Lou Ann Walker recounts the day, ten years ago, when Robert Reeves, who would be rebuilding the MFA Creative Writing Program at Stony Brook University, opined that a "distinguished MFA program" should likewise have a "distinguished literary journal as its intellectual and creative center." Then he asked Lou Ann: "Do you happen to know anyone who might be interested in founding and editing a literary review?" She writes that it had been her "secret dream" to do just that. Ten years later, Walker has created exactly the publication worthy of the university's writing program - and vice versa! Publishing two issues per year, readers can also find selections available to read on the TSR website.
Published June 28, 2017
hanging looseHanging Loose, published by Hanging Loose Press since 1966, includes the section "Writers of High School Age" in each issue. Featured in issue 108 are two young poets who contribute several works each.

Elizabeth Girdharry writes of math and sciences with "Filling Empty Spaces," including the lines "Mathematical formulas, / on how to stay tangent to the line, / somehow slipped my mind," and "There Was Geometry" begins: "There is geometry in my junk drawer." And comes back around to, "More importantly, / there is geometry in my junk drawer. / Angles and tangents twist out of circles / the same way you smooth back flyaway wisps of baby hair / when you're pondering a hard science theory."

Elise Wing crafts strong imagery to draw her readers in. "The Microscope" begins "Dead diatom / Crisp as a leaf skeleton," and "The Living That Terrifies" begins with the amusing but poignant, "Your ears are the trees for egrets to nest in," and "Tomorrow, the Seagulls" starts, "The future is as frightening as a three-headed hyena."

NewPages includes Hanging Loose in our Young Writers Guide where we list publications written by and for young writers and readers as well as a vetted, ad-free list of contests for young writers.
Published June 27, 2017
louisville reviewIn celebration of TLR's 40 years of publication and "looking toward the future," Sena Jeter Naslund writes in the Editor's Note, four guest editors all under the age of forty were invited to select works for this first issue year 41. "Each of them is a graduate, in various areas of concentration, of the Spalding University low-residency MFA in Writing Program," notes Naslund. Making the selections: Eva Sage Gordon, nonfiction editor; Ellyn Lichvar, poetry and Children's Corner editor; Amina S. McIntyre, drama editor; Flora K. Schildknecht, fiction editor.
Published June 26, 2017
gettysburg reviewThe Summer 2017 issue of The Gettysburg Review features paintings by Tina Newberry. In addition to this untitled cover piece, there are eight works in a full-color portfolio inside. It's also worth a visit to her website to view her Barbies series.
brickYou have to take a close look at this detail from "Iron Horse" by Kent Monkman on the cover of Brick #99 to get the full effect of the kind of cultural/historical mishmash that makes up this image and a great many of his works.
hermeneutic chaos"Myth" by Eiko Ojala is a papercut illustration for the cover of the May 2017 issue of Hermeneutic Chaos Journal, an online bi-monthly publishing poetry and prose.
Published June 21, 2017
Poet Clare Paniccia surprises readers by following up this title with the imagery of boys dissecting frogs in biology class, then skillfully guides this action to align with that of a girl's realization about the nature of [those] boys who would treat girls similarly. Never in my life would I have put these two together, but Paniccia's ability to do so seamlessly engages the reader in a strange tangle of reminicent emotion. Take the opportunity to hear her, and others on TriQuarterly's online journal, read the work herself. 

Self-Portrait as Girl Being Led On
By Clare Paniccia

I watched them do it,
their small, fat fingers taking
          to the swell of chest a blunt scalpel
and peeling, no, sawing into stomach
                 their fitful curiosity, the frog’s
                         glass eye staring outward and empty,
                 staring toward the very mouths of schoolboys
          who entered so brutally the crevice, the abdomen’s
                                    silenced bell. . . . 

Read the rest and hear the poem read by the author on TriQuarterly.
Published June 20, 2017
In his introduction to Issue 97 of Translation Review, Boris Dralyuk, literary translator and the Executive Editor of the Los Angeles Review of Books, writes: "Today’s Russian-to-English translation community is far broader and more diverse; the body of work of any given translator might be smaller than that of Garnett, but there are so many more gifted translators that the shared corpus is a monumental achievement. In this, our era of translation does indeed resemble the Silver Age of Russian poetry..." Dralyuk goes on to discuss many contemporary writers, some of whose works fill the pages of this issue, "The Silver Age of Russian-to-English Transaltion," while also recognizes the shoulders of the Golden Age writers upon which we now stand.

Translation Review is a forum for the discussion of the art, practice and theory of literary translation published by UT Dallas Center for Translation Studies and available online via Routledge Taylor & Francis Online. The full issue can be accessed here for individuals/institutions with logins. Without a login, the full preface can be accessed as well as beginning excerpts from each work published.
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