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Published July 07, 2016
nadia szilvassyIssue #97 of Brick, writes Publisher Nadia Szilvassy, if it had a theme, would be "bittersweet," as it pays tribute to the life and work of two of the magazines "longtime contributors and dear friends, C. D. Wright and Jim Harrison." The issue is also the last for Szilvassy as publisher. After over nine years with the magazine, she leaves Editor Laurie D. Graham, Managing Editor Liz Johnston and Designer Mark Byk to steer the publication. "You will..." Szilvassy promises, "find yourselves newly inspiried and delighted." Farewell Nadia. Our best to you.
Published July 06, 2016
write placeThis week marks the eight-year anniversary of online literary magazine The Write Place at the Write Time, founded July 3rd 2008. In those eight years, the journal has been read in 80 countries, and the editors have published 29 issues with over 338 contributors of ranging ages, cultures, and publication credits. More than producing a literary magazine, the editors have also organized projects throughout the years, such as a Filmed Poetry Reading, a Pay-It-Forward Initiative, a Twitter Tales experiment where a group of writers created a story via tweets, and more.

To celebrate the anniversary, check out the Spring/Summer 2016 issue, which includes new fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and art, with an anniversary scrapbook that looks back at past anniversaries. The Writers Craft Box features an opportunity for writers to explore the significance of numbers for a prize, and in interviews, Tracy Chevalier, author of Girl with a Pearl Earring, discusses her latest novel, At the Edge of the Orchard, as well as the themes found in her work.

Happy anniversary, The Write Place at the Write Time. We at NewPages wish you many more years to come.
Published July 06, 2016
southern humanities reviewThe newest issue of Southern Humaniites Review (v49 n2) includes a special poetry section of selections from Of River, a chapbook edited by Chiyuma Elliot and Katie Peterson, who also each contribute a piece.The entire chapbook is available to read for free online here. The editors open the collection with this explanation:
We began with Langston Hughes’s 1921 award-winning poem “The Negro Speaks of Rivers” and the charge to write something in response. There was something in the invitation about nature poetry and how that seemed important, but otherwise the instructions were open-ended (perhaps scarily so). We asked poets of very different styles and sensibilities, only some of whom were already engaged with Hughes’s work: F. Douglas Brown, Jericho Brown, Katie Ford, Rachel Eliza Griffiths, Derrick Harriell, Dong Li, Sandra Lim, and Michael C. Peterson. We wanted to see what each of these writers would make. In both the individual poems and the group as a whole, we weren’t disappointed; the poems ask, reach, and posit literary relationship in phenomenally different ways.
Published June 22, 2016

louisville review n79 spring 2016The Louisville Review accepts submissions from students in grades K-12 to feature in “The Children’s Corner” section of the journal. In the Spring 2016 issue, four young writers were published:

Kate Busatto, “The Communion”

Kiran Damodaran, “Collision Theory”

Andrew D. Swann, “Jelly Dreams,” “God Didn’t Make the World Round,” and “Worn and Broken”

Isabel Young, “Our Romance is Kamikaze:”

Get a copy of The Louisville Review to check out these new writers.

 

Published June 21, 2016

poetry v208 n3 june 2016The June 2016 issue of Poetry features cover art by Anna Maria Maiolino. On Harriet: The Blog, Fred Sasaki provides more information about this artist who, it turns out, also creates visual and written poetry with all her works considered to be “poetic actions.”

Maiolino speaks about her series Photopoemaction, from which the June 2016 cover art comes:

"The photographic series Fotopoemação is a result of the elaboration of images that emerged from my written poems. [ . . . ] These series, other than constituting a challenge to the poetic labour, are efficient instruments of both innovation and freedom. They result from thinking about the things of the world, from the attempt to transform what we live through into consciousness in a poetic operational movement of conduct."

Check out the full blog post to read more, or stop by the Poetry webpage to listen to this month’s podcast and check out the work inside the June 2016 issue.

Published June 20, 2016

ninth letterAmong the blue-font decorated pages of the latest issue of Ninth Letter, readers will find an art feature and interview with Bert Stabler and Katie Fizdale, a look at Detroit by Caitlin McGuire in the “Where We’re At” section, and the 2015 Literary Award Runners-Up, listed below.

Creative Nonfiction:

Julie Marie Wade, “The Regulars”

Fiction:

Zach VandeZande, “Status Updates”

Poetry:

Monica Sok, “Here Is Your Name”

Rachael Katz, “All About Flash”

Check out all the other goodies inside this new, shiny (no, really, it’s literally shiny) issue of Ninth Letter and grab yourself a copy.
Published June 17, 2016

rhino 2016The 2016 issue of RHINO is out and includes the 2016 Editors’ Prize winners and the 2016 Founders’ Prize winners inside.

Editors’ Prizes 2016:

First Prize

Lee Sharkey, “Tashlich”

Second Prize

Catherine Wing, “Report from the Neandertal Mind”

Honorable Mention

Teresa Dzieglewicz, “Stranger, thank you for giving me this body”

Translation Prize

Anonymous translated from the Anglo-Saxson by Bill Christopherson, “The Seafarer”

Founders’ Prize 2016:

First Prize

Greg Grummer, “The Great Butterfly Collapse”

Runners-Up

Katie Hartsock, “On the Heat of Upstate Travel in the Advancing Polar Air”

Teresa Dzieglewicz, “St. Maria Goretti speaks to the girl”

Readers can find these poems on the RHINO website, with a full table of contents linking to the writers’ websites.

Published June 16, 2016

december v27 n1 spring summer 2016The Spring/Summer 2016 issue of december features the winner and finalists of the Jeff Marks Memorial Poetry Prize (with submissions opening back up in autumn). This year, the magazine received over 1,200 contest entries, which were then narrowed down to 20 semi-finalists. From these selections, judge Marge Piercy selected the following for the winner, honorable mentions, and finalists.

First Place:

Jim Dwyer, “Enlightenment”

Honorable Mention:

Kate Gray, “Reassurance” and “For Every Girl”

Finalists:

José Angel Araguz, “Cazar Means to Hunt Not to Marry”

Debbie Benson, “Uchi Vallai”

Kierstin Bridger, “Preparing to Sink”

Tova Green, “March Storm at Abbots Lagoon”

John McCarthy, “What I mean When I Say I Don’t Box Anymore”

M.H. Perry, “Cardamom, Osprey, Banff, Us”

Cocoa M. Williams, “Leda on a Stoop in St. Bernard Projects (1974)”

Grab a copy of december’s Spring/Summer 2016 issue to read these poems.

Published June 15, 2016
concho river review v30 n1 spring 2016Concho River Review recently launched their Spring 2016 issue which marks the beginning of their 30th year of publication. With the first issue released in the spring of 1987, founder Terry Dalrymple expected the journal to last for only five years. Now, he estimates CRR has published around 7000 pages throughout the years with 250 pieces of fiction, 900 poems, 200 pieces of nonfiction, and 300 book reviews. Whew!

Happy anniversary, Concho River Review. We hope to see you around for many more years (and pages).
Published June 15, 2016
agniAgni Online offers free access to fiction, poetry and essays as an extension of their print publication. These contributions are offered exclusively online, and recent works include “Pinays” an essay by Ricco Villanueva Siasoco; “Seam Ripper” flash fiction by Kathryn Hill; “I Fell Asleep Among the Horses” poem by Kathryn Starbuck; “One Hundred Years of Solitude, or The Importance of a Story” an essay by Oksana Zabuzhko; “Sibboleth” an essay by Dan Beachy-Quick; “First Boyfriend” a poem by Chase Twichell; and “Jury Duty” a story by William Virgil Davis.
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