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Published December 14, 2016
true storyNew from Creative Nonfiction is the monthly True Story, a pocket-sized (4.25x6.75) paperback featuring one long-from essay. Spotlighting one author per month, CNF aims to provide readers the widest possible variety of styles and content in their selections. Steven Kurutz's Fruitland headlined Issue 1 (39pp; read excerpt here), and just out, Issue 2 delivers Steven Church's Trip to the Zoo (25pp; read excerpt here). Available in one- and two-year subscriptions, this is a great holiday gift idea for the readers and writers on your list!
Published December 12, 2016
Got readers and writers on your holiday gift list? Not sure what to give them this year, or maybe the 'blank book' idea is wearing thin? How about a gift basket of top-notch literary magazines? Every reader and writer will appreciate having a selection of the newest issues of the country's best literary publications, and the NewPages webstore makes it easy as sugar cookies to get your hands on these! Just stopy by our webstore, chose any single issue copies you want from a variety of publications, and we will ship them to you (or to your gift recipient) for a flat fee of $3.50 (U.S. Media; other rate options available). A bargain! Want one? Want a dozen? The more the merrier, and the shipping is the same. So stop on by this week and get your holiday shopping done!
Published November 22, 2016
2016 lilly fellowsNovember 2016 Poetry Magazine features works from the 2016 Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Poetry Fellows: Kaveh Akbar, Jos Charles, Angel Nafis, Alison C. Rollins, and Javier Zamora [as pictured]. The Poetry Magazine website includes the full content from the publication, in addition to recordings of several of the Fellows reading their works. The Poetry Foundation selects five poets between the ages of 21 and 31 years annually for the Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Poetry Fellows, each of whom receives $25,800 to support their further pursuits in writing. Read more about each of the Fellows here.
Published November 17, 2016

sink hollowSink Hollow is a landmark of Logan Canyon, at the mouth of which stands Utah State University and its iconic Old Main Building bell tower. In the canyon, Sink Hollow refers to a series of depressions that trap cold air, causing the hollows to be noticeably colder than the rest of the canyon. Visitors can expect to find frost on a July afternoon in the sinks.

Read more...
Published November 16, 2016
michelle johnson wltThe November-December 2016 issue of World Literature Today is dedicated "cover to cover" to women writers.

Managing Editor Michelle Johnson [pictured] writes in the Editor's Note: ". . . several months ago [the editors at WLT] decided to dedicate the November 2016 issue exclusively to women writers—and women reviewing women writers. The editorial team briefly considered creating such an issue without comment—as if WLT existed in a utopia of parity where all writers in a literary magazine might just happen to be women. But in 2016, giving women the whole issue is still noteworthy even for a magazine like WLT with a strong track record of publishing women writers."

The collection opens with Alison Anderson's "Of Gatekeepers and Bedtime Stories: The Ongoing Struggle to Make Women's Voices Heard," part of The Puterbaugh Essay Series. See a full list of contents here.
Published November 15, 2016
louisville reviewThe Louisville Review celebrates 40 years of continuous publishing with its Fall 2016 issue. In her Editor's Note, Sena Jeter Naslund writes, "When I first held the newborn literary magazine in my hands, with great joy and satisfaction in 1976, and placed it alone, upright and wobbly on my office shelf, I thought, Someday there will be a whole row of this journal. That vision has come true, thanks to the initial support of the University of Louisville, the diligence of Karen J. Mann and myself in fundraising and cost-cutting, and to the generous continuing support of both the magazine and our Fleur-de-Lis Press by Spalding University. I thank these institutions, and Karen, the writers who have contributed their work to these eighty issues, and the enthusiastic readers over the last forty years." Thank you TLR and congratulations!
Published October 31, 2016
katherinesanchezespanoThe newest issue of The Bitter Oleander: A magazine of contemporary international poetry and short fiction, features an interview with and a selection of poetry from Katherine Sánchez Espano.

Espano received her MFA from the University of Florida and has taught English and creative writing classes at several colleges. Her poetry has appeared in The Massachusetts Review, Green Mountains Review, The Bitter Oleander, Sycamore Review, and Spoon River Poetry Review, among others. Her work has also been included in the American Diaspora: Poetry of Displacement and Like Thunder: Poets Respond to Violence in America anthologies. In 2015, she published her first book of poetry, The Sky's Dustbin, the winner of the 2014 Bitter Oleander Press Library of Poetry Book Award.

She is also a poet with the We Are You Project, an international organization "created to inform, enlighten, stimulate, and educate the public on the many facets and realities of Latino identity as it emerged over the past four centuries and continues to evolve in this, the 21st Century" through art exhibits, documentaries, poetry, lectures, and seminars.

Read an excerpt from the interview and one of her poems here.
Published October 27, 2016
heather 2016“Heather is your friend. Heather is your girlfriend. Heather is your girlfriend’s girlfriend. Heather is leaning against the wall at your neighbor's house party. Heather is next to you in bed, naked.”

Enticed? I certainly was, which is why I contacted Kelsey Mars, founder and sole editor of Heather, a new online indie literary publication, to learn more about this nakedness next to me in bed.

First – the name. "Heather," Kelsey tells me, “is a unique feminine name, as well as being a shade of purple and a color generally associated with alternative sexuality. I wanted Heather as a publication to embody all aspects of this, to draw up images of bad girls in pleated skirts and the back row of the movie theater.”

Publishing fiction, non-fiction and poetry as well as digital art, photography and film, readers can determine whether or not the content stands up to its namesake. The free, online PDF features poems “about subjects that might make you uncomfortable,” Kelsey warns, as well as “erotica, film to chew on, stories about robots, flash fiction to make you cry a single diamond tear.”

While new to this venture, Kelsey is a seasoned literary professional. “I've been published in Huffington Post: Queer Voices, Thought Catalog, Miscellany, Meat For Tea and am upcoming in Painted Bride. You can read my original screenplay, Gotham Summer, as I tweet it out: @gothamsummer. I studied Media Theory and Communications at the College of Charleston, where I was first introduced to flash fiction writing. Since then, I've written two novels and more poems and flash fiction than is healthy for one person. In the light of day, I work on the Customer Experience team at Casper Sleep and preach the good word of Elizabeth Gilbert's Big Magic: Never ask your art to pay for you.”

While involved in so much of her own writing,I asked Kelsey the motivation for adding this responsibility. “So many of us get rejection after rejection, often without knowing why. So many voices go unheard in this industry and it's a damn shame. I started Heather to publish the weird stuff, the stuff that other publications might not see as ‘premium’ or literary enough. I wanted experimental stuff, the weirdest thing someone has ever written. I wanted a home for that stuff.”

Writers looking to home their works should know that Kelsey manages submissions on a rolling basis, accepting works as they fit the arc of each issue, offering the work more than one shot, but releasing it if it hasn’t found its fit after two issue cycles. Heather accepts simultaneous submissions, which keeps the editorial process timely.

Already, Heather has been made home by authors such as Maggie Cooper, whose first published pieces of fiction appeared in Heather and, as Kelsey notes: “totally blew my mind”; Monique Quintana, a fiction editor herself “whose shit haunts my dreams” Kelsey says; and Kirsten Bledsoe, a filmmaker whom Kelsesy knew prior to Heather, who has made both a feature length series about queer women of color and a prodigious ode to Marilyn Monroe's poetry (which Heather published).

The future for Heather is boundless: “I want to go to Mars, dude,” Kelsey tells me with an edge of seriousness. “I want to see what's outside of our solar system. Send me poems, fiction, art about that stuff. The stuff that we don't even know yet. Let's go to uncharted territory and live to brag about it.” Back down on earth, Kelsey hopes to publish Heather three times this year and keep the publication going well beyond that.

In addition to the regular publishing cycle, Kelsey is planning a special holday issue. The publication is not holiday themed, “but rather what you actually want to be reading when you're avoiding your family over the holidays,” Kelsey says. “I'd like to publish more creative nonfiction in this issue, poetry about our fears, things like that.” Submissions accepted via Submittable; deadline November 27 to be published December 11.

As a final word, Kelsey encourages writers: “The most important thing I want people to take away from Heather is that you can do it to. You can publish the stuff YOU love. And if more of us do that, more of us will realize we're someone's favorite thing.”
Published October 26, 2016
new england reviewCrossing Through the Present: German Poetry in Translation is a special section in the current issue of Middlebury College's New England Review (v37 n3). "The selection of writing from Germany assembled here," writes Carolyn Kuebler, "came about as the result of both intention and accident—NER ’s ongoing intention to offer an inspiring, provocative range of literary voices, and the happy accident of our own Ellen Hinsey’s living for a time in Berlin. While there, Ellen read a particularly intriguing essay about poetry, notebook-keeping, and Hannah Arendt, and she suggested it would be worth translating for NER. . . She also met the essay’s author, the writer Marie Luise Knott, who offered to share her familiarity with the scene to help us choose a selection of new German poetry. Add to that a call for submissions, a series of meetings in Berlin cafés, and several time-zone-jumping phone calls, and the result is that this issue contains not only a multitude of voices from the English-speaking world, as always, but also a multitude of voices from the German-speaking world. They meet here in our pages."

Two works, "Zakid’s Delicatessen, Bremen" by Peter Waterhouse (trans. Iain Galbraith) and "on classification in language, a feeble reader" by Uljana Wolf (trans. Sophie Seita), are available to read on the NER website along with Kuebler's Editor's Note for this issue.
Published October 21, 2016
Father Fragments
by Erica Goss

Once a week I wipe the dust from the lid,
tilt the little jar of ashes

and watch them settle. Where
is his giant bark of a laugh,

his hand smacking the table
so hard my plate jumped?

Night after night he voiced
all the parts in Huckleberry Finn. . .

[read the rest and more on gravel]
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