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Published October 31, 2016
katherinesanchezespanoThe newest issue of The Bitter Oleander: A magazine of contemporary international poetry and short fiction, features an interview with and a selection of poetry from Katherine Sánchez Espano.

Espano received her MFA from the University of Florida and has taught English and creative writing classes at several colleges. Her poetry has appeared in The Massachusetts Review, Green Mountains Review, The Bitter Oleander, Sycamore Review, and Spoon River Poetry Review, among others. Her work has also been included in the American Diaspora: Poetry of Displacement and Like Thunder: Poets Respond to Violence in America anthologies. In 2015, she published her first book of poetry, The Sky's Dustbin, the winner of the 2014 Bitter Oleander Press Library of Poetry Book Award.

She is also a poet with the We Are You Project, an international organization "created to inform, enlighten, stimulate, and educate the public on the many facets and realities of Latino identity as it emerged over the past four centuries and continues to evolve in this, the 21st Century" through art exhibits, documentaries, poetry, lectures, and seminars.

Read an excerpt from the interview and one of her poems here.
Published October 27, 2016
heather 2016“Heather is your friend. Heather is your girlfriend. Heather is your girlfriend’s girlfriend. Heather is leaning against the wall at your neighbor's house party. Heather is next to you in bed, naked.”

Enticed? I certainly was, which is why I contacted Kelsey Mars, founder and sole editor of Heather, a new online indie literary publication, to learn more about this nakedness next to me in bed.

First – the name. "Heather," Kelsey tells me, “is a unique feminine name, as well as being a shade of purple and a color generally associated with alternative sexuality. I wanted Heather as a publication to embody all aspects of this, to draw up images of bad girls in pleated skirts and the back row of the movie theater.”

Publishing fiction, non-fiction and poetry as well as digital art, photography and film, readers can determine whether or not the content stands up to its namesake. The free, online PDF features poems “about subjects that might make you uncomfortable,” Kelsey warns, as well as “erotica, film to chew on, stories about robots, flash fiction to make you cry a single diamond tear.”

While new to this venture, Kelsey is a seasoned literary professional. “I've been published in Huffington Post: Queer Voices, Thought Catalog, Miscellany, Meat For Tea and am upcoming in Painted Bride. You can read my original screenplay, Gotham Summer, as I tweet it out: @gothamsummer. I studied Media Theory and Communications at the College of Charleston, where I was first introduced to flash fiction writing. Since then, I've written two novels and more poems and flash fiction than is healthy for one person. In the light of day, I work on the Customer Experience team at Casper Sleep and preach the good word of Elizabeth Gilbert's Big Magic: Never ask your art to pay for you.”

While involved in so much of her own writing,I asked Kelsey the motivation for adding this responsibility. “So many of us get rejection after rejection, often without knowing why. So many voices go unheard in this industry and it's a damn shame. I started Heather to publish the weird stuff, the stuff that other publications might not see as ‘premium’ or literary enough. I wanted experimental stuff, the weirdest thing someone has ever written. I wanted a home for that stuff.”

Writers looking to home their works should know that Kelsey manages submissions on a rolling basis, accepting works as they fit the arc of each issue, offering the work more than one shot, but releasing it if it hasn’t found its fit after two issue cycles. Heather accepts simultaneous submissions, which keeps the editorial process timely.

Already, Heather has been made home by authors such as Maggie Cooper, whose first published pieces of fiction appeared in Heather and, as Kelsey notes: “totally blew my mind”; Monique Quintana, a fiction editor herself “whose shit haunts my dreams” Kelsey says; and Kirsten Bledsoe, a filmmaker whom Kelsesy knew prior to Heather, who has made both a feature length series about queer women of color and a prodigious ode to Marilyn Monroe's poetry (which Heather published).

The future for Heather is boundless: “I want to go to Mars, dude,” Kelsey tells me with an edge of seriousness. “I want to see what's outside of our solar system. Send me poems, fiction, art about that stuff. The stuff that we don't even know yet. Let's go to uncharted territory and live to brag about it.” Back down on earth, Kelsey hopes to publish Heather three times this year and keep the publication going well beyond that.

In addition to the regular publishing cycle, Kelsey is planning a special holday issue. The publication is not holiday themed, “but rather what you actually want to be reading when you're avoiding your family over the holidays,” Kelsey says. “I'd like to publish more creative nonfiction in this issue, poetry about our fears, things like that.” Submissions accepted via Submittable; deadline November 27 to be published December 11.

As a final word, Kelsey encourages writers: “The most important thing I want people to take away from Heather is that you can do it to. You can publish the stuff YOU love. And if more of us do that, more of us will realize we're someone's favorite thing.”
Published October 26, 2016
new england reviewCrossing Through the Present: German Poetry in Translation is a special section in the current issue of Middlebury College's New England Review (v37 n3). "The selection of writing from Germany assembled here," writes Carolyn Kuebler, "came about as the result of both intention and accident—NER ’s ongoing intention to offer an inspiring, provocative range of literary voices, and the happy accident of our own Ellen Hinsey’s living for a time in Berlin. While there, Ellen read a particularly intriguing essay about poetry, notebook-keeping, and Hannah Arendt, and she suggested it would be worth translating for NER. . . She also met the essay’s author, the writer Marie Luise Knott, who offered to share her familiarity with the scene to help us choose a selection of new German poetry. Add to that a call for submissions, a series of meetings in Berlin cafés, and several time-zone-jumping phone calls, and the result is that this issue contains not only a multitude of voices from the English-speaking world, as always, but also a multitude of voices from the German-speaking world. They meet here in our pages."

Two works, "Zakid’s Delicatessen, Bremen" by Peter Waterhouse (trans. Iain Galbraith) and "on classification in language, a feeble reader" by Uljana Wolf (trans. Sophie Seita), are available to read on the NER website along with Kuebler's Editor's Note for this issue.
Published October 21, 2016
Father Fragments
by Erica Goss

Once a week I wipe the dust from the lid,
tilt the little jar of ashes

and watch them settle. Where
is his giant bark of a laugh,

his hand smacking the table
so hard my plate jumped?

Night after night he voiced
all the parts in Huckleberry Finn. . .

[read the rest and more on gravel]
Published October 20, 2016
claire rudy foster"Nobody wants to feel everything, just as nobody wants to read work by a writer who is emotionally incontinent. In real life, I may be strung out on anxiety, or aching from bad news, or jubilant, or missing someone I love. However, I know that my job is not to directly transmit those emotions to the reader. My job is to live my life, feel my feelings, and then learn to translate what I’m feeling without making it about me."

From "Emotion is Not Plot: Using Detachment to Create Powerful Fiction" a craft essay by Claire Rudy Foster in the online journal Cleaver Magazine.
Published October 18, 2016
xu xiIssue 53 Fall 2016 of Brevity is a special issue on Race, Racism, and Racialization and includes such essays and authors as "Black in Middle America" by Roxanne Gay, "A Pop Quiz for White Women Who Think Black Women Should Be Nicer to Them in Conversations about Race" by Deesha Philyaw, "How to Discuss Race as a White Person" by Samuel Stokley, "Things People Said: An Essay in Seven Steps" by Sejal Shah, "How to Erase an Arab" by Julie Hakim Azzam, and "Mexican Americans and American Mexicans: An Etymology" by Sarah A. Chavez.

The online journal also includes guest editors for this issue Joy Castro and Ira Sukrungruang in conversation with one another about "what they hoped for and what they learned" in putting this issue together, as well as the accompanying craft essay "Three Commandments for Writing About Race" by Xu Xi [pictured].
Published October 17, 2016
3elements review3Elements Review is an online quarterly literary journal publishing fiction, nonfiction, poetry, art, and photography. Unique to this publication, submissions for each issue must include the three elements the publishers post in advance. Past issue elements include: labyrinth, trace, reflex; measure, cleaver, silver; mania, tower, exposure.

The most recent issue (Fall 2016 #12) features the elements passageway, relic, kiss. "When we first chose the elements for this issue . . ." write the editors, "we worried that this specific trio of words would be a bit too leading. Would we get dozens of submissions about alluring, illicit affairs, kisses stolen along the shadowy hallways of castles and cathedrals? As it turned out – the answer was no. This issue is filled with writers and artists who surprised us, who made us see and consider the elements in ways we never had before, and we are honored to be able to share their work with you all."

The elements for Issue 13 are THREAD, GLAZE, MURMUR with a submission deadline of October 31.
Published October 11, 2016
creative nonfictionContinuing an annual tradition started three years ago, Creative Nonfiction presented a list of topics to its newsletter subscribers and social media followers and had them vote for the ones they liked best. "Mistakes" was the first issue (#53), followed the next year by "Waiting" (#56), and now, for 2016, "Childhood" (#60), with the subtitle: "It's not all fun and games." Each Readers' Choice issue also includes a Best Essay contest. Readers can access on the CNF website the winning essay, “The Walk Home" by Judith Barrington, and an interview with Barrington; "Before We're Writers, We're Readers" by Randon Billings Noble - 15 nonfiction authors on the true (or mostly true) stories they read as kids; Lee Gutkind's introduction; and two additional pieces: "I Survived the Blizzard of '79" by Beth Ann Fennelly and "Writing Motherhood" by Marcelle Soviero.
Published October 11, 2016
nicole caruso garciaAble Muse has announced that Nicole Caruso Garcia has joined their staff as Assistant Poetry Editor, replacing the departing Richard Meyer. Nicole Caruso Garcia was born grew up in New Jersey and Connecticut, earned her B.A. in English from Fairfield University, and an M.S. in Education from University of Bridgeport. She was a 2006 Summer Institute Fellow of the Connecticut Writing Project and currently teaches poetry and creative writing at Trumbull High School in Connecticut. Her poetry has appeared in Mezzo Cammin, Willow Review, The Raintown Review, The Sow's Ear Poetry Review, Soundings East, The Ledge, Poetry Midwest, and Small Pond Magazine of Literature, and she received the Spring 2010 Willow Review Award. But, to show her ability to flex poetic styles, while she tends toward formalist poetry, "her rapping alter ego, Capital G, often visits to bust a rhyme for her students." We at NewPages can dig it.
Published October 10, 2016
crabfat magazinePhotographer John Chavers' kaleidoscope image is featured on the October 2016 online issue of Crab Fat Magazine, a journal "founded on the principles of inclusive & diverse writing/publishing." And they mean it.
georgia reviewThe Georgia Review has been turning heads for 70 years and will be celebrating through the year with a variety of special events that they will update on their website. The Fall 2016 cover art ("#1637") is by Masao Yamamoto, whose work is also featured with an introduction and full-color, twelve-page portfolio within.
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