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Published June 27, 2017
louisville reviewIn celebration of TLR's 40 years of publication and "looking toward the future," Sena Jeter Naslund writes in the Editor's Note, four guest editors all under the age of forty were invited to select works for this first issue year 41. "Each of them is a graduate, in various areas of concentration, of the Spalding University low-residency MFA in Writing Program," notes Naslund. Making the selections: Eva Sage Gordon, nonfiction editor; Ellyn Lichvar, poetry and Children's Corner editor; Amina S. McIntyre, drama editor; Flora K. Schildknecht, fiction editor.
Published June 26, 2017
gettysburg reviewThe Summer 2017 issue of The Gettysburg Review features paintings by Tina Newberry. In addition to this untitled cover piece, there are eight works in a full-color portfolio inside. It's also worth a visit to her website to view her Barbies series.
brickYou have to take a close look at this detail from "Iron Horse" by Kent Monkman on the cover of Brick #99 to get the full effect of the kind of cultural/historical mishmash that makes up this image and a great many of his works.
hermeneutic chaos"Myth" by Eiko Ojala is a papercut illustration for the cover of the May 2017 issue of Hermeneutic Chaos Journal, an online bi-monthly publishing poetry and prose.
Published June 21, 2017
Poet Clare Paniccia surprises readers by following up this title with the imagery of boys dissecting frogs in biology class, then skillfully guides this action to align with that of a girl's realization about the nature of [those] boys who would treat girls similarly. Never in my life would I have put these two together, but Paniccia's ability to do so seamlessly engages the reader in a strange tangle of reminicent emotion. Take the opportunity to hear her, and others on TriQuarterly's online journal, read the work herself. 

Self-Portrait as Girl Being Led On
By Clare Paniccia

I watched them do it,
their small, fat fingers taking
          to the swell of chest a blunt scalpel
and peeling, no, sawing into stomach
                 their fitful curiosity, the frog’s
                         glass eye staring outward and empty,
                 staring toward the very mouths of schoolboys
          who entered so brutally the crevice, the abdomen’s
                                    silenced bell. . . . 

Read the rest and hear the poem read by the author on TriQuarterly.
Published June 20, 2017
In his introduction to Issue 97 of Translation Review, Boris Dralyuk, literary translator and the Executive Editor of the Los Angeles Review of Books, writes: "Today’s Russian-to-English translation community is far broader and more diverse; the body of work of any given translator might be smaller than that of Garnett, but there are so many more gifted translators that the shared corpus is a monumental achievement. In this, our era of translation does indeed resemble the Silver Age of Russian poetry..." Dralyuk goes on to discuss many contemporary writers, some of whose works fill the pages of this issue, "The Silver Age of Russian-to-English Transaltion," while also recognizes the shoulders of the Golden Age writers upon which we now stand.

Translation Review is a forum for the discussion of the art, practice and theory of literary translation published by UT Dallas Center for Translation Studies and available online via Routledge Taylor & Francis Online. The full issue can be accessed here for individuals/institutions with logins. Without a login, the full preface can be accessed as well as beginning excerpts from each work published.
Published June 20, 2017
rattleThe summer 2017 issue of Rattle features a tribute to poets living with mental illness. "An estimated 26% of Americans experience mental illness in a given year," write the editors, "and we wanted to acknowledge and explore that reality, while also helping to diminish the associated cultural stigma of these illnesses. [. . . ] While the topics of the poems themselves vary greatly, each of the poets live with some form of depressive, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive, bi-polar, post-traumatic stress, or eating disorder—all of discussed openly and bravely in their contributor notes. In the conversation section, we talk about mental illness and a wide range of other topics with Francesca Bell." [Cover Art by Jasmine C. Bell.]
Published June 15, 2017
still pointArtists say things with objects, images, symbols, and metaphors that are difficult, if not impossible, to express any other way.
Artists have tremendous courage, a necessary quality when it comes to expressing personal dreams and emotions so all can see them.
Artists break down barriers of thought, time, custom, and expectation.
Artists make the intangible tangible.
Artists see the trees and the forest.
Artists challenge us to see and understand our world differently than we do now.
Artists are born with open hands and open hearts, courageously willing to accept whatever is given.
Imagine our world without artists, without their ability to see, dream, express, break down barriers, and challenge the rest of us to imagine our world differently.

Excerpted from Christine Brooks Cote, "Imagine Our World Without Artists," from Still Point Arts Quarterly, Summer 2017.
Published June 13, 2017
poetryThe June 2017 issue of Poetry features photographs and artifacts from the Poetry Foundation’s forthcoming exhibit, Matter in the Margins: Gwendolyn Brooks at 100, curated by Anna Chen, June 16–August 25, 2017.

Chen writes: "Gwendolyn Brooks’s literary archives, now in the Rare Book & Manuscript Library at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, reveal that she clustered and bundled papers as well as life experiences: she tucked notes inside pieces of paper folded into makeshift pockets, slid photographs behind other photographs in albums, and pasted clippings on top of each other in scrapbooks. She added further layers of meaning with her copious annotations, like the detailed notes she wrote on the backs of many of her photographs (given in quotation marks in the accompanying images) in order to preserve the knowledge of the people and events they captured."

Read Chen's full introduction to this feature as well as view a slideshow of the photographs and artifacts here.
Published June 09, 2017
NambozoFusion is Prarie Schooner's online series, which Editor Kwame Dawes says, "is an opportunity to create dialog across geographical spaces and cultures through the sharing of art and writing. It represents an effort to create bridges between the many silos that separate us, and to do so by asking writers to think about the very things that connect us and distinguish us in different parts of the world." Issue #11 is a collaboration with Ugandan poetry and art on the theme "Shoes."

In her essay, "Ngato! Ngato! Shoes!" Ugandan Poet Beverley Nambozo Nsengiyunva [pictured] writes, "It's often the most silent shoes that are the strongest. It's the shoes that allow thieves to stalk upon unsuspecting people and the shoes that enable a cheetah to pounce on its prey. The silent shoes do not desire unnecessary attention to detract them from their mission."

Read the full issue here.
Published June 07, 2017
creative nonfictionIn his introduction to Issue 63 (Spring 2017) of Creative Nonfiction, themed "How We Teach," Lee Gutkind writes about attending a yoga and creative writing retreat where he is teaching creative nonfiction to an "ecclectic" group of attendees. Just as varied is the group's experience with yoga, which the yoga instructor misjudged by giving too rigorous of a few first sessions. Gutkind writes that the instructor backed down after that, teaching technique and form basics, regardless of the participant's experience level. "We hard-core students thought we knew all of this stuff—some of us have been practicing for decades—so we were somewhat apprehensive at first. But as the lesson progressed, we began to realize that going back to the basics and relearning what we thought we knew was quite helpful."

Gutkind likens this to our need to review our own practice, weed out bad habits we may have developed over the years, and get back in tune with the basics: "In yoga or writing—or in practicing any art or skill—it does not hurt to start over once in a while just to make sure you know what you think you know. In fact, it occurs to me this is also why teaching can be reinvigorating—I know many writers who make their primary living by teaching and who often find their inspiration in writing prompts given to their students. But maybe there’s also something about focusing on the basics that can inspire innovation and transformation."

Read the full editorial here.
Published June 06, 2017
dubie normanThe Spring 2017 issue of The Fiddlehead: Atlantic Canada's International Literary Journal includes a special feature on 2016 Griffin Prize international winner Norman Dubie. Editor Ross Leckie introduces the section of twenty-three poems, including five new ones, with "Norman Dubie: The Details of Winter That Upset Us."

Leckie writes, "No poet I can think of writes as much about dreams as Dubie, and no poet ought to be able to, as dreams are so often adduced as the moment of epiphany, as the encoded truth that underlies all the banality that consumes our daily lives. In Dubie’s work, however, dreams seem as one room in the mind’s library, in which there is also an astonishing array of books and the lives of their authors, and details of plot and character that are not there, but could be. There are landscapes both from memory and from imagination, scenes of history in the grotesquerie of its filth and muck, and assorted friends and family who demand attention, or simply stop by for a chat."
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