NewPages.com is news, information, and guides to literary magazines, independent publishers, creative writing programs, alternative periodicals, indie bookstores, writing contests, and more.

Published September 03, 2008
On Reading
W.W. Norton, September 2008
ISBN 978-0-393-06656-2
68 duotone photographs/80 pages

"André Kertész (1894-1985) was one of the most inventive, influential and prolific photographers in the medium's history. This small volume, first published in 1971, became one of his signature works. Taken between 1920 and 1970, these photographs capture people reading in many parts of the world. Readers in every conceivable place—on rooftops, in public parks, on crowded streets, waiting in the wings of the school play—are caught in a deeply personal, yet universal, moment. Kertész's images celebrate the absorptive power and pleasure of this solitary activity and speak to readers everywhere. Both playful and poetic, On Reading is reissued with striking new duotone reproductions. Fans of photography and literature alike will welcome this classic."
Published August 12, 2008
From The Gospel According to Bruce Springsteen by Jeffrey B. Symynkywicz - posted in full with comments on NPR.

1. The world has gone awry.

2. There is a power within the souls of men and women to transcend the world and to achieve real victories in spite of the world.

3. The world is as it is.

4. Life without connections is empty and dangerous.

5. Our stories symbolize something deeper.

6. Life is embodied.

7. It's all about change.

8. There is no guarantee of success.

9. Hope is resilient.

10. There is always something more.
Published July 25, 2008
What's Next - Roll Your Own Literature?
By Alison Morris
Publishers Weekly
July 24, 2008

"I'm really not quite sure what to make of this idea.... In 2007 the U.K.-based TankBooks published a series of classic books in small form – cigarette pack-sized form, to be exact – and packaged them in, essentially, cigarette packages. They called this series Books to Take Your Breath Away.'"

Read more on Publishers Weekly.
Published May 19, 2008
Posted last week on the Village Voice, this article includes a list of famous writers' favorite obscure books, each with a brief comment. Check out a few mentions here:

Our Favorite Writers Pick Their Favorite Obscure Books
by Alexander Nazaryan
From the Village Voice Summer Guide
May 13th, 2008

Jennifer Egan
You Can't Live Forever, by Harold Q. Masur

John Banville
Some People, by Harold Nicolson

Donna Tartt
Blood in the Parlor, by Dorothy Dunbar

Rick Moody
Frank Zappa: The Negative Dialectics of Poodle Play, by Ben Watson

Jonathan Ames
The Lunatic at Large, by J. Storer Clouston

Read the rest of the list complete with comments on Village Voice online.
Published May 06, 2008
Between Women
Friendship, Desire, and Marriage in Victorian England

by Sharon Marcus

Women in Victorian England wore jewelry made from each other's hair and wrote poems celebrating decades of friendship. They pored over magazines that described the dangerous pleasures of corporal punishment. A few had sexual relationships with each other, exchanged rings and vows, willed each other property, and lived together in long-term partnerships described as marriages. But, as Sharon Marcus shows, these women were not seen as gender outlaws. Their desires were fanned by consumer culture, and their friendships and unions were accepted and even encouraged by family, society, and church. Far from being sexless angels defined only by male desires, Victorian women openly enjoyed looking at and even dominating other women. Their friendships helped realize the ideal of companionate love between men and women celebrated by novels, and their unions influenced politicians and social thinkers to reform marriage law.

Through a close examination of literature, memoirs, letters, domestic magazines, and political debates, Marcus reveals how relationships between women were a crucial component of femininity. Deeply researched, powerfully argued, and filled with original readings of familiar and surprising sources, Between Women overturns everything we thought we knew about Victorian women and the history of marriage and family life. It offers a new paradigm for theorizing gender and sexuality--not just in the Victorian period, but in our own.

Sharon Marcus is Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University.

*Thanks to Bronte Blog for noting this book.
Published May 04, 2008
From Kyle Zimmer, President, First Book:

First Book is joining forces with eBay Foundation, the charitable arm of eBay Inc., for Community Gives – an online fundraising campaign designed to engage the eBay Community in supporting First Book’s mission to provide new books to the children who need them most.

First Book is one of only three organizations eBay Foundation has chosen to support, based on input from the eBay Community. The campaign kicked off on Monday with a $1 million grant split evenly among First Book, Best Friends Animal Society and Oxfam. In addition, to encourage participation eBay Foundation will give an extra dollar to First Book for every person who donates.

Funds generated will support First Book’s to reach and provide brand new books and educational resources to tens of thousands more Recipient Groups nationwide.
Published May 01, 2008
Wouldn't you like to be an Author too?

Rachel Donadio's essay in the Sunday New York Times Book Review, You’re an Author? Me Too! explores this very phenomenon - or is it pestilence - of book "publishing." Beginning with what we all know by now - U.S.ers are reading less, yet, "In 2007, a whopping 400,000 books were published or distributed in the United States, up from 300,000 in 2006, according to the industry tracker Bowker, which attributed the sharp rise to the number of print-on-demand books and reprints of out-of-print titles."

And at the same time our nation is reading less, there are more writers in the U.S. than at any other time in our history, and credentialed MFA programs kicking out an exponentially growing number of these. Additionally, Donadio notes that for as little as $3.50 a copy, "authors" can have their books printed and distributed through Amazon, and Borders is no in the fray, offering print packages starting at $300, with the "premium package," which includes some actual editorial work, starting at $500.

While Donadio discusses the role of the writing programs as the "democratizer" of the talent pool, Gabriel Zaid, critic and author of "So Many Books: Reading and Publishing in the Age of Abundance," says: "Everyone now can afford to preach in the desert."

Good? Bad? Hard as writers, publishers - and readers - to be indifferent on this topic.

Read the full article here.
Published April 15, 2008
Special Tupelo Press Limited Edition Hardcovers Support Poetry in the Schools

Tupelo Press kicked off its Poetry in the Schools fundraising initiative with a series of limited edition hardcover books. The following recent releases are available in numbered, signed editions for $100. There are only 100 copies of each hardcover.

Dismal Rock by Davis McCombs
Psalm by Carol Ann Davis
Spill by Michael Chitwood

Inflorescence by Sarah Hannah is also available in a numbered limited edition hardcover (of 200) for $100.

Proceeds from the sales of these special releases go to support Tupelo's Poetry in the Schools program, which will bring poets into grammar schools and high schools across the country to deliver the joy and wonder of poetry to a nation of school children who have suffered under tremendous cuts to their arts budgets.

You may order through the Tupelo Press website or by calling directly, 802-366-8185.
Published April 11, 2008
17 Ways to Get Free Books
From the Frugal Panda Blog

"You can never have too many books, so we are delighted to share with you some ways to get them for free. From children’s books to technical books, there are numerous resources that offer literature for free. Some of the following sites offer actual printed books, while others feature electronic books (aka 'ebooks')."

A great list with descriptions of each resource. Thank FP!
Published March 26, 2008

Too Short to be a novel, too long to be a short story - what, exactly, is a novella?

An award-winning series from Melville House Publishing answers the question by taking a look at the renegade form in all its varieties, as practiced by some of history's greatest writers. It does so in a beautifully packaged and inexpensive line featuring many titles that have never been published as stand-alone books before, many that are otherwise unavailable, and many that are in sparkling new translations. Consider these for classroom use as well as personal reading! Visit The Art of the Novel page on MHP's Web site for more information.

BARTLEBY THE SCRIVENER by HERMAN MELVILLE mhp

THE LESSON OF THE MASTER by HENRY JAMES

MY LIFE by ANTON CHEKHOV

THE DEVIL by LEO TOLSTOY

THE TOUCHSTONE by EDITH WHARTON

THE HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES by ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE

THE DEAD by JAMES JOYCE

FIRST LOVE by IVAN TURGENEV

A SIMPLE HEART by GUSTAVE FLAUBERT

THE MAN WHO WOULD BE KING by RUDYARD KIPLING

MICHAEL KOHLHAAS by HEINRICH VON KLEIST

THE BEACH OF FALESA by ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

THE HORLA by GUY DE MAUPASSANT

THE ETERNAL HUSBAND by FYODOR DOSTOEVSKY

THE MAN THAT CORRUPTED HADLEYBURG by MARK TWAIN

THE LIFTED VEIL by GEORGE ELIOT

THE GIRL WITH THE GOLDEN EYES by HONORE DE BALZAC

A SLEEP AND A FORGETTING by WILLIAM DEAN HOWELLS

BENITO CERENO by HERMAN MELVILLE

MATHILDA by MARY SHELLEY

A CASTLE IN TRANSYLVANIA by JULES VERNE

STEMPENIU: A JEWISH ROMANCE by SHOLEM ALEICHEM

FREYA OF THE SEVEN ISLES by JOSEPH CONRAD

HOW THE TWO IVANS QUARRELLED by NIKOLAI GOGOL

THE LEMOINE AFFAIR by MARCEL PROUST

THE COXON FUND by HENRY JAMES

MAY DAY by F. SCOTT FITZGERALD

RASSELAS, PRINCE OF ABYSSINIA by SAMUEL JOHNSON

THE DECEITFUL MARRIAGE by MIGUEL DE CERVANTES

newpages-footer-logo

We welcome any/all Feedback.